Catalog Volume 48

College Catalog

2020–2022

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College Catalog

2020–2022

 

Catalog Volume 48

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© 2020 Suffolk County Community CollegeNon-Discrimination Notice

2020-2022 Catalog

The Online College Catalog provides the most up-to-date information, including the latest changes to curriculum, courses, and policies.Browse Catalog Archives

Suffolk at a Glance

Type: Co-ed, two-year, public community college
Setting: Suburban
Founded: 1959
Sponsors: State of New York, County of Suffolk

Campuses

Ammerman at Selden
Eastern at Riverhead
Michael J. Grant at Brentwood

Accreditations

  • Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE)
  • Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN)
  • Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND)
  • American Bar Association (ABA)
  • American Occupational Therapy Association (ACOTE)
  • American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)
  • ASE Education Foundation
  • Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM)
  • Commission on Accrediting in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE)
  • Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP)
  • Commission on Accreditation for Allied Health Programs (CAAHEP)

Academic Programs

The College offers degrees and certificates in approximately 100 options of study. Degrees include:
  • Associate in Arts (A.A.)
  • Associate in Science (A.S.)
  • Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.)

College Faculty

462 full-time faculty; 1,514 adjunct faculty

Student Body

All College: Approximately 25,000 students
 
Ammerman: 14,439 total
  • 6,027 full-time; 8,412 part-time
Eastern: 4,066 total
  • 1,266 full-time; 2,800 part-time
Michael J. Grant: 10,538 total
  • 3,377 full-time; 7,161 part-time

Gender:  Female: 54% |  Male: 46%

Age:       18-24: 81%  |  25 and over: 19%

Ethnicity:

White: 49.8% Asian Pacific: 4.0%
Black: 7.9% American Indian: 0.4%
Hispanic: 18.9% Other/Unknown: 19.0%

Estimated Annual Expenses

Tuition and Fees (residents): $6,275
Books/Supplies: $1,500

 

Financial Aid

Suffolk County Community College awards more than $60 million in federal and state financial aid to more than 16,000 students annually. A tuition payment plan is available.

The Suffolk Community College Foundation also awards hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships each year.

Federal Grants and Loans:
PELL Grants
Supplemental Educational Opportunity
Grants (SEOG)

College Work Study
STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Grant
William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

New York State Grants:
Excelsior Scholarship Program
Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)
New York State STEM (NYSSTEM)
Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS)
New York Part-Time Scholarships
New York Foster Youth Funding
State Aid to Native Americans

Other Sources of Aid:
Adult Career and Continuing Education
Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR)
Veterans GI Bill Benefits
DMNA Educational Incentive Program
New York State Department of Labor
Department of Social Services
Employer Tuition Reimbursement Programs

Athletics

Intercollegiate Sports (Division III of the National Junior College Athletic Association - NJCAA)
  • Men: Baseball, Basketball, Bowling, Cross Country, Golf, Lacrosse, Soccer, Tennis, Track
  • Women: Basketball, Bowling, Cross Country, Soccer, Softball, Tennis, Track, Volleyball

Cheer Team, Dance Team, Equestrian, and Men's Ice Hockey sponsored by the Athletic Department.

A wide range of intramural sports.

Services/Student Life

  • Educational, Career and Personal Counseling
  • Services for Students with Disabilities
  • Career Planning and Services
  • Child Care Facilities
  • Student Newspaper and Literary Publications
  • Theatre Productions, Musical Performances, Art Exhibits
  • Films, Lectures, Concerts, Trips
  • 150 Clubs

Academic Support Services

  • Learning Labs for Mathematics, Reading, Writing
  • Tutorial Services
  • Student Success Program
  • Library Open 7 Days a Week

And More...

  • Small Classes Averaging 23 Students
  • Accessible Faculty
  • Study Abroad Programs
  • Honors Program
  • English as a Second Language (ESL) Program
  • Transfer Opportunities
  • Joint Admission Agreements
  • Co-op/Internship Programs
  • Early morning, day, evening, weekend, or online classes available

Interim President’s Greetings

Your Success Starts at Suffolk

There are numerous reasons why Suffolk County Community College is the ideal place to begin the pursuit of your educational goals. With an enrollment of approximately 25,000 students, the College provides affordable, quality higher education, delivered in small class settings, led by faculty with credentials from many of the country’s most acclaimed institutions. Suffolk’s faculty, staff and administrators are dedicated to fostering an environment that helps students attain their academic and career goals. With flexible scheduling options that give you the choice of classes in the early morning, day, evening, weekend or online, Suffolk makes it easier for you to achieve the future you deserve.

As the largest community college in the State University of New York (SUNY) system, Suffolk offers a full collegiate experience. With recognized NJCAA (Division III) athletic programs, internships, more than 150 student clubs, an honors program and student support services, you will have countless opportunities to grow both academically and personally.

Suffolk offers today’s most sought-after programs, including Cybersecurity, Nursing, Culinary Arts, Theatre Arts, Radio and Television Production, Criminal Justice, and many more. We offer articulation and dual admissions agreements with many local and nationally renowned four-year schools. We are proud to say that our students routinely transition to a variety of baccalaureate programs at public and private colleges and universities on Long Island, around New York State, and throughout the nation. Suffolk also offers a broad range of scholarships for new and continuing students. In fact, the Suffolk Community College Foundation awards hundreds of thousands of dollars in student scholarships each year.

Our Office of Workforce Development works closely with regional industry to ensure a pipeline of skilled and credentialed students in CNC machining, welding, soldering and other growth areas to meet projected workforce demands. We also offer English as a Second Language (ESL) to Suffolk County’s residents.

Suffolk County Community College is a vibrant and continuously improving higher education resource. Whether you start with the goal of transferring to a four-year institution after graduation or you are seeking certain classes to enhance your career skills, you will find everything you need to succeed here at Suffolk. There is no doubt we are the best choice for your first two years of higher education.

Sincerely,
Louis J. Petrizzo
Interim President

Academic Calendar

Fall 2020

Date Day of Week Description
September 2 Wednesday Day, evening, and online classes begin
September 7 Monday Labor Day - no classes
September 12–13 Saturday–Sunday Saturday and Sunday classes begin
October 13 Tuesday SCCC Professional Development Day
October 21 Wednesday Mid-Semester
November 9 Monday Priority registration for spring 2021 begins; wintersession registration begins
November 10 Tuesday Withdrawal Date
November 11 Wednesday Veterans Day - no classes
November 25–29 Wednesday–Sunday Thanksgiving recess - no classes
November 30 Monday Classes resume
December 19–20 Saturday–Sunday Last meeting of Saturday and Sunday classes
December 23 Wednesday Last meeting of classes
December 24 Thursday Optional class make-up date, if necessary

Wintersession 2020-2021

Date Day of Week Description
December 28 Monday Classes begin
January 1 Friday New Year's Day - no classes
January 6 Wednesday Mid-Semester
January 11 Monday Withdrawal Date
January 15 Friday Last meeting of classes

Spring 2021

Date Day of Week Description
January 25 Monday Day, evening, and online classes begin
January 30–31 Saturday–Sunday Saturday and Sunday classes begin
February 15 Monday Presidents' Day - no classes
March 2 Tuesday SCCC Professional Development Day
March 17 Wednesday Mid-Semester
March 22–28 Monday–Sunday Spring recess - no classes
April 5 Monday Priority registration for summer and fall 2021 begins
April 12 Monday Withdrawal Date
May 8–9 Saturday–Sunday Last meeting of Saturday and Sunday classes
May 18 Tuesday Last meeting of classes
May 19 Wednesday Optional class make-up dates, if necessary
May 20 Thursday Suffolk County Community College Commencement 2021

First Five-Week Summer 2021

Date Day of Week Description
June 1 Tuesday Classes begin
June 16 Wednesday Mid-Semester
June 22 Tuesday Withdrawal Date
July 1 Thursday Last meeting of classes

Eight-Week Summer 2021

Date Day of Week Description
June 1 Tuesday Classes begin - Eight-Week
June 24 Thursday Mid-Semester
July 5 Monday Independence Day observed - no classes
July 7 Wednesday Withdrawal Date
July 22 Thursday Last meeting of classes

Second Five-Week Summer 2021

Date Day of Week Description
July 6 Tuesday Classes begin
July 21 Wednesday Mid-Semester
July 27 Tuesday Withdrawal Date
August 5 Thursday Last meeting of classes

Fall 2021

Date Day of Week Description
September 2 Thursday Day, evening, and online classes begin
September 6 Monday Labor Day - no classes
September 11–12 Saturday–Sunday Saturday and Sunday classes begin
October 12 Tuesday SCCC Professional Development Day
October 27 Wednesday Mid-Semester
November 8 Monday Priority registration for spring 2022 begins; wintersession registration begins
November 10 Wednesday Withdrawal Date
November 11 Thursday Veterans Day - no classes
November 24–28 Wednesday–Sunday Thanksgiving recess - no classes
November 29 Monday Classes resume
December 18–19 Saturday–Sunday Last meeting of Saturday and Sunday classes
December 23 Thursday Last meeting of classes
December 24 Friday Optional class make-up date, if necessary

Wintersession 2021-2022

Date Day of Week Description
December 27 Monday Classes begin
January 4 Tuesday Mid-Semester
January 6 Thursday Withdrawal Date
January 13 Thursday Last meeting of classes

Spring 2022

Date Day of Week Description
January 24 Monday Day, evening, and online classes begin
January 29–30 Saturday–Sunday Saturday and Sunday classes begin
February 21 Monday Presidents' Day - no classes
March 1 Tuesday SCCC Professional Development Day
March 23 Wednesday Mid-Semester
April 4 Monday Priority registration for summer and fall 2022 begins
April 11 Monday Withdrawal Date
May 7–8 Saturday–Sunday Last meeting of Saturday and Sunday classes
May 17 Tuesday Last meeting of classes
May 18 Wednesday Optional class make-up dates, if necessary
May 19 Thursday Suffolk County Community College Commencement 2022

First Five-Week Summer 2022

Date Day of Week Description
May 31 Tuesday Classes begin
June 15 Wednesday Mid-Semester
June 21 Tuesday Withdrawal Date
June 30 Thursday Last meeting of classes

Eight-Week Summer 2022

Date Day of Week Description
May 31 Tuesday Classes begin - Eight-Week
June 23 Thursday Mid-Semester
July 4 Monday Independence Day observed - no classes
July 5 Tuesday Withdrawal Date
July 21 Thursday Last meeting of classes

Second Five-Week Summer 2022

Date Day of Week Description
July 5 Tuesday Classes begin
July 20 Wednesday Mid-Semester
July 26 Tuesday Withdrawal Date
August 4 Thursday Last meeting of classes

General Information

History

The History of Suffolk County Community College

On December 18, 1959, Suffolk County Community College of the State University of New York was founded under the administration of a nine-member board of trustees, five appointed by the then County Board of Supervisors and four by the Governor of the State of New York.

On October 3, 1960, the College officially opened, occupying temporary facilities at Sachem Junior-Senior High School in Ronkonkoma, New York, as well as part-time facilities at Riverhead High School in Riverhead. Initial enrollment included 171 full-time students and 335 part-time students.

As the College began to grow, the Board of Supervisors of Suffolk County provided a 130-acre site in Selden for a permanent campus. Six buildings on the site were renovated and converted, equipment necessary for the operation of the College was obtained, and in August 1961 the College occupied what was later to be known as the Ammerman Campus, renamed in honor of the College’s founding president, Dr. Albert M. Ammerman.

The second year of operation opened with over 1,400 full- and part-time students. In June 1962, the College held its first commencement exercises, at which 42 graduates received associate degrees. Two other permanent campuses were opened – the Michael J. Grant Campus in Brentwood in 1974 and the Eastern Campus in Riverhead in 1977.

One College, Three Campuses

Ammerman Campus (Selden, NY)

Today, the Ammerman Campus encompasses 156 acres and has 17 academic, administrative and auxiliary buildings. In 2015, the College opened the 62,700-square-foot William J. Lindsay Life Sciences Building, which contains science classrooms, laboratories and prep rooms as well as lecture halls and meeting spaces.

Michael J. Grant Campus (Brentwood, NY)

The Michael J. Grant Campus occupies a site of 207 acres with 15 academic, administrative and auxiliary buildings, including an 110,000-square-foot building which houses classrooms, laboratories, and a theatre. A 277,000-square-foot complex, which houses the Suffolk County Police Academy, a pool, field house, fitness center and health technology wing, opened in 2000.

Located on the Michael J. Grant Campus, the Sally Ann Slacke Corporate Training Center continues to provide a wide array of customized workforce and professional development training for the region's business sector, not-for-profit organizations and public agencies.

In September 2009, the College opened the Workforce Development and Technology Center. This 18,000-square-foot building is LEED Gold Certified by the U.S. Green Building Council and includes state-of-the-art laboratories, classrooms and office space.

As part of our partnership with Long Island University, a new modular building was completed in 2016 on the Michael J. Grant Campus.

In 2017, the College completed construction on a 74,200-square-foot Learning Resource Center, which includes traditional library functions as well as a 100-seat lecture hall, the Academic Tutoring Center, the Writing Studio, meeting space and a Teaching Learning Center.

The College is also developing a new Renewable Energy/STEM Center on this campus. This facility will be the cornerstone of new academic initiatives (both credit and non-credit) being developed in Energy Management, Alternative Energy Technologies, Sustainability Studies as well as Cybersecurity and other STEM disciplines. Design, construction, equipment planning and curriculum development for new academic programming is expected to be completed in 2021.

Eastern Campus (Riverhead, NY)

The Eastern Campus, located on a 192-acre site in the Pine Barrens of eastern Long Island, comprises six academic buildings and three auxiliary buildings.

In March 2011, the College opened the Montaukett Learning Resource Center, a 40,000-square-foot building, at the center of the Eastern Campus. The facility includes a state-of-the-art library, a large lecture hall, computer classrooms, a multi-media room, the Academic Skills Center, gallery space and varied learning spaces for students to pursue collaborative and independent study.

Also on the Eastern Campus, the College offers a 40,214-square-foot Health and Wellness Center. The Center opened in 2020 and contains a pool, a gymnasium, strength training and a rock climbing wall.

A Leader in Education

In 2005, in an effort to revitalize traditional downtown areas and provide additional access to educational opportunities, the College embarked on opening two downtown satellite educational centers. A downtown center opened in Sayville specifically to address nurse education. Located close to public transportation, the facility includes state-of-the-art laboratories for nursing, medical assisting, anatomy and physiology classes and offers courses in the allied health professions and continuing education.

In January 2008, the Culinary Arts and Hospitality Center opened in downtown Riverhead. The Center offers two-year A.A.S. degrees in Culinary Arts, Baking and Pastry Arts, and Hotel and Resort Management, as well as certificates and continuing education courses. The Center includes classrooms, hands-on training labs, a 60-seat demonstration theatre, a retail bakery and café.

Suffolk County Community College is the largest community college in the State University of New York (SUNY) system, enrolling approximately 25,000 students. It offers more than 100 degree and certificate options in business and legal studies; communications and the arts; computer science, engineering and technology; culinary arts and hospitality management; health, community and human services; education; liberal arts and sciences. The original full-time faculty of fewer than a dozen has grown to more than 460. By May 2020, the College had over 130,000 alumni.

Each year, Suffolk County Community College prepares students to enter the workforce upon graduation in such marketable areas as medical records, physical therapist assistant, paralegal, nursing, culinary arts and many other fields. Other students transfer to four-year colleges and universities to complete their baccalaureate degree. Suffolk graduates have gone on to study at institutions such as Columbia, Harvard, Cornell, New York University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as institutions within the State University of New York.

State University of New York (SUNY)

Suffolk County Community College is a two-year unit of the State University of New York (SUNY).

SUNY's 64 statewide campuses bring educational opportunity within commuting distance of virtually all New York citizens and comprise the nation's largest, comprehensive system of public higher education.

When founded in 1948, SUNY consolidated 29 state-operated, but unaffiliated, institutions. Since then, SUNY has grown to a point where its impact is felt educationally, culturally and economically throughout the state.

SUNY offers more than 7,500 degree and certificate programs at its 64 campuses, which include 30 community colleges. Certificate and degree opportunities range from one-year certificates of completion and two-year associate degree programs to doctoral studies.

The 30 two-year community colleges operating under the SUNY program play a unique role in the expansion of educational opportunity by:

  • providing transfer options to students who wish to continue to earn advanced degrees
  • providing local industry with trained technicians in a wide variety of workforce curricula, and
  • providing the community with a resource for academic, technical and professional advancement, as well as personal enrichment.

To learn more about SUNY, visit www.suny.edu.

The SUNY Board of Trustees is the governing body of the State University of New York. It consists of 18 members, 15 of whom are appointed by the Governor, by and with consent of the New York State Senate. In addition, the presidents of SUNY's Student Assembly, Faculty Council of Community Colleges, and University Faculty Senate serve as ex-officio members of the Board. The Student Assembly President is a voting member.

Mission and Vision

Mission Statement

Suffolk County Community College promotes intellectual discovery, physical development, social and ethical awareness, and economic opportunities for all through an education that transforms lives, builds communities, and improves society.

Vision Statement

Suffolk County Community College commits to maintaining high educational standards, to fostering and inspiring student success, and to creating diverse opportunities for lifelong learning. By attracting strong leadership and distinguished faculty to a college of excellence, we create an enriched learning environment that empowers students to transform their lives.

 

Professional Associations

Suffolk County Community College is a member of the American Association of Community Colleges, American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, Community College General Education Association, National Junior College Athletic Association, and other professional organizations. Members of its faculty and administration are active participants in many learned and professional societies. Faculty are regular contributors to professional journals and are active participants in professional organizations and conferences.

Accreditations

Suffolk County Community College curricula are registered by the New York State Department of Education. The College is authorized to award the Associate in Arts degree, the Associate in Science degree and the Associate in Applied Science degree as established by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York as well as the Certificate of Completion.

Suffolk County Community College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104. (267-284-5000) www.msche.org. The MSCHE is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).

The College’s accreditation was reaffirmed on June 21, 2018. The College’s next self-study will be in 2026-2027. Please click here for additional information about our institutional accreditation.

For a list of all accrediting bodies, see Suffolk at a Glance.

Graduation and Retention

Fall-to-Fall Retention Rate

2015‐2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

Change from previous year

KPI Target by 2020

Status

68.3%

67.3%

67.5%

66.8%

-0.7

70%

Approaching

 

150% of time (3 years) FT/FT Graduation Rate

2013 Cohort
(as of 8/16)

2014 Cohort
(as of 8/17)

2015 Cohort 
(as of 8/18)

2016 Cohort
(as of 8/19)

1-year change

4-year change

KPI Target by 2020

Status

24%

26%

27%

24%

-3

0

20%

Exceeding

Libraries

Overview

There is a library on each of the three campuses which provides information resources, instruction, computers, laptop loans, group study spaces and other services. The campus libraries collectively offer a book collection totaling 200,000 volumes. Online databases are extensive and link to thousands of periodicals and newspapers and provide resources beyond the scope of community college requirements. Access to e-books and an extensive collection of academic databases that feature full-text journals, newspapers and magazines is available through the library.

Library databases include Academic Search Complete, ArtStor, Nursing Made Incredibly Easy, JSTOR Digital Archive, Literature Resource Center, and Science Direct. In addition, a wide assortment of media and digital materials are available to support classroom and individual learning needs. Students and faculty can access library collections in the libraries on the campuses. In addition, off campus access for all electronic resources is available online to the College's community through their user name and password.

Library Research

Library faculty assist students with their information and research needs. There are extensive open hours, face-to-face reference and virtual online Chat for all hours that the library is open, including evenings and weekends. In collaboration with classroom instructors, students are taught effective critical thinking skills that promote information literacy. The libraries provide additional opportunities for students to gain proficiency using and evaluating information sources by offering credit courses entitled Introduction to College Research (LIB101, 1 credit), both face-to-face and online. A description of the contents of this course can be found at Library Research.

Additional Resources

The campus libraries actively participate with other university and college libraries to share resources which give students and faculty access to the collections on Long Island, in the state and beyond. Suffolk's libraries also participate in the State University of New York Open Access system which allows students and faculty in-person borrowing privileges at any SUNY campus library. Campus library hours and locations are available on the library webpage. For additional information: (631) 451-4800 (Ammerman), (631) 548-2536 (Eastern) or (631) 851-6740 (Michael J. Grant).

Ammerman Campus Library

Susan Lieberthal, Campus Head Librarian, and the entire library staff welcome you to the Huntington Library on the Ammerman Campus! We have over 100,000 books to support you. Our college databases bring in thousands of full-text journals, accessible both on and off campus. Our computer labs offer many computers for you to use.

We also have 15 laptops that can be checked out and used in the library for two hours at a time. You may sign up for a group study room, use our collaborative lab for open group use, and even lounge on our comfy seating in between classes. Please see our reference librarians for any questions or call (631) 451-4830.

Ammerman Library Phone Numbers
Ammerman Library Staff Directory
Directions

Eastern Campus Library

The Montaukett Learning Resource Center (MLRC) is the new home for the Eastern Campus Library. The new library opened in January 2011 and offers a variety of study areas and rooms, state-of-the-art instructional library classrooms and ample computer and technology workspaces. It houses more than 38,000 print titles including an English as a Second Language (ESL) collection.

The MLRC is also home to the Academic Skills Center and several classrooms including the Eastern Campus' Distance Education classroom. There are two lecture rooms, as well as a gallery on the first floor. Please see our reference librarians for any questions or call (631) 548-2536.

MLRC Photo Tour
Eastern Library Phone Numbers
Eastern Library Staff Directory
Directions

Michael J. Grant Campus Library

Photo of the Grant LibraryThe Michael J. Grant Campus welcomes students, faculty, and staff to the Learning Resource Center (LRC). We provide diverse academic resources and research support through access to databases, books, and e-books textbooks; face-to-face and reference chat; and a state-of-the-art facility. The LRC houses an information commons offering students access to 80+ computers; library reference and Academic Computing tech help desks; a 3-D printer; a one-button video studio; and group and individual study rooms.  Two smart classrooms fill the needs of the hundreds of research classes that come through the library every year. The Center for Academic Excellence, the Writing Center, a lecture hall, and other facilities are also located in the LRC. We encourage you to use our resources, services and facilities as part of your path to academic success.

Grant Library Phone Numbers
Grant Library Staff Directory
Directions

Academic Computing

The College provides access to computers, printers and scanners for all students, with a valid ID card, on each of the three campuses. Internet access, necessary curriculum software, and the technological means to accommodate and complete all class-related assignments are provided in the computing spaces. Some computer labs have open lab hours. Professional staff is available to assist students and faculty with computer use. For easy access to this site, and to the online Tech Chat, you can use the following short URL from any browser: sunysuffolk.edu/acc.

Users of the College’s computer resources should refer to the College's  for rules and regulations regarding the use of these resources at the College.

 



Ammerman Campus

Huntington Library
1st Floor

Phone: (631) 451-4211

More Information »



Eastern Campus

Orient Building
2nd floor

Phone: (631) 548-2612

More Information »



Michael J. Grant Campus

Learning Resource Center
Information Commons

Phone: (631) 851-6356 or (631) 851-6556

More Information »

Campus Locations and Maps



Ammerman Campus

533 College Road
Selden, NY 11784
(631) 451-4110

View on Google Maps
Download Printable Map and Directions

The Ammerman Campus, situated on 156 wooded acres in Selden, is the oldest of the three campuses with an enrollment of over 14,000 students. It offers a wide array of programs in the liberal arts and sciences, visual and performing arts, engineering and computer sciences, as well as technological training in electronics, telecommunications, computers, drafting and construction. A new state-of-the-art automotive training facility houses the Automotive Service Specialist program. Nursing, Physical Therapist Assistant, Human Services and American Sign Language are among some of the highly regarded health career programs that offer students clinical training. A fully equipped campus studio provides hands-on experience for the Radio and Television Production students, and Fitness Specialist majors work with the most up-to-date exercise training equipment. The campus also features a full spectrum of programs in business, accounting and paralegal studies with opportunities for credit-bearing internships.

Directions to the Ammerman Campus, Selden

Take the Long Island Expressway to Exit 62. Proceed north on Nicolls Road (CR97) about 2 miles to first traffic light. Turn right at the main campus entrance.

Note: Due to the need to address conditions in the Annex Building, we have temporarily relocated College and Association employees to the locations specified below:

Central Records . . . . . . . . . .Huntington Library, L104 (main level, SE corner)
Central Admissions . . . . . . . Huntington Library, L104 (main level, SE corner)
Continuing Ed . . . . . . . . . . . Sayville Center 3rd Floor (various offices)
Public Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . Babylon Student Center (117 Cafeteria)
Student Association . . . . . .  Huntington Library, OIT or L15 (lower level)
Lighthouse Training. . . . . . . Smithtown - T118
Transfer Credit . . . . . . . . . . Huntington Library, L104 (main level, SE corner)  



Eastern Campus

121 Speonk-Riverhead Road
Riverhead, NY 11901
(631) 548-2500

View on Google Maps
Download Printable Map and Directions

The Eastern Campus is located on Long Island's rural east end in Riverhead, the gateway to the Hamptons and North Fork vineyards. Enrolling over 4,000 students, it offers a broad range of liberal arts and business courses, and specialized programs in Graphic Design, Dietetic Technology, Culinary Arts and Interior Design.

Directions to the Eastern Campus, Riverhead

Take the Long Island Expressway to Exit 70. Take County Road 111 four miles to County Road 51. Turn left toward Riverhead and go north on 51. After 3 ½ miles, turn right onto Speonk-Riverhead Road to campus entrance on right-hand side.

From the west using Sunrise Highway (Rt 27), go to Exit 61. Take County Road 51 north four miles to Speonk-Riverhead Road. Turn right on to Speonk-Riverhead Road to campus entrance on right.

From the east on the North Fork: Follow Rt. 25 west to downtown Riverhead. At Peconic Avenue, turn left and go ¼ mile to the traffic circle. Take the first right (Rt. 24) off the traffic circle and go ¼ mile to the County Center at Rt. 51. Turn left onto Rt. 51 and go south 3 miles to Speonk-Riverhead Road. Turn left onto Speonk-Riverhead Road to campus entrance on right.

From the east on the South Fork: Follow Rt. 27 (Sunrise Highway) west to Rt. 24 at Hampton Bays. Go north on Rt. 24 approximately 7 miles, past the traffic circle, to Rt. 51. Turn left onto Rt. 51 and go south 3 miles to Speonk-Riverhead Road. Turn left onto Speonk-Riverhead Road to campus entrance on right.

Michael J. Grant Campus

Crooked Hill Road
Brentwood, NY 11717
(631) 851-6700

View on Google Maps
Download Printable Map and Directions

The Michael J. Grant Campus in Brentwood enrolls over 10,000 students. It provides a wide range of programs including Occupational Therapy Assisting, Nursing, Veterinary Science, Medical Records, Paralegal Studies, Criminal Justice, Early Childhood, Addiction Studies, Business, Accounting, and Liberal Arts and Sciences. The Suffolk Federal Credit Union Arena houses health and technology classes as well as the Suffolk County Police Academy. It includes a pool, field house, fitness center, and health technology wing.

Directions to the Michael J. Grant Campus, Brentwood

From the west, take the Long Island Expressway to Exit 52, Commack Road. Cross over Commack Road, stay right to Crooked Hill Road. Right on Crooked Hill Road to the campus entrance on the left. Take the Loop Road to the left to the Sally Ann Slacke Center. Take a right after the center to parking field 2B.

Suffolk Federal Credit Union Arena

From the east or west take the Long Island Expressway to Exit 53. Follow signs to Wicks Road.  Go south ½ mile on Wicks Road to campus entrance on right-hand side.

Sally Ann Slacke Center (Corporate Training Center)

From the east, take the Long Island Expressway to Exit 53. Follow signs to Wicks Road. Go south ½ mile on Wicks Road to campus entrance on right-hand side. Take the Loop Road to the right to parking field 2B.

Sayville Downtown Center

30 Greene Avenue
Sayville, NY 11782
(631) 851-6972

View on Google Maps

Directions

The Sayville Downtown Center is located one block north of Main St. (Montauk Hwy), adjacent to the LIRR train station. View the train schedule.

  • Take Sunrise Highway to Exit 49, Lakeland Ave.
  • Head south on Lakeland Ave. for approximately 1.5 miles.
  • Cross the LIRR tracks and make a right on to Depot Street.
  • Make the first left on to Greene Ave.
  • The Sayville Downtown Center is on your immediate right.

Parking Locations

  1. Municipal parking lot at the corner of Depot St. and Greene Ave.
  2. Front of Sayville Downtown Center at 30 Greene Ave.
  3. Rear of Sayville Downtown Center on Greeley Ave.

Culinary Arts and Hospitality Center

20 East Main Street
Riverhead, NY 11901

View on Google Maps

Directions

From the west, using Long Island Expressway (I-495E): Go to Exit 71. Take CR94/Rt.24E for 5 miles to downtown Riverhead traffic circle. From the circle exit north onto Peconic Ave. toward Main St. Riverhead. Turn right onto Main St. and make 1st left onto Roanoke Ave. Make 1st right off Roanoke Ave. into public parking lot.

From the west, using Sunrise Highway (Rt. 27E): Go to Exit 61. Take County Road 51 north for 7 miles to CR94/Rt.24E. Make slight right onto CR94/Rt.24E and take for .2 miles to the downtown Riverhead traffic circle. From the circle exit north onto Peconic Ave. toward Main St. Riverhead. Turn right onto Main St. and make 1st left onto Roanoke Ave. Make 1st right off Roanoke Ave. into public parking lot.

From the east on the North Fork: Follow Rt. 25W to downtown Riverhead and turn right onto Roanoke Ave. Make 1st right off Roanoke Ave. (at Gazebo) into public parking lot.

From the east on the South Fork: Follow Rt. 27W (Sunrise Highway) to Exit 65N at Hampton Bays. Take Rt. 24N for 7 miles to the downtown Riverhead traffic circle. From the circle exit north onto Peconic Ave. toward Main St. Riverhead. Turn right onto Main St. and make 1st left onto Roanoke Ave. Make 1st right off Roanoke Ave. into public parking lot.

Contact and Directories

Central Administration and Offices

Ammerman Campus Administration and Offices

Eastern Campus Administration and Offices

Michael J. Grant Campus Administration and Offices

Sayville Center Offices

Culinary Arts Center Offices

Campus Safety, Emergency Information and Parking

Office of Public Safety

To serve and protect the college community by providing and creating a safe environment within our capabilities contributing to the overall Suffolk County Community College mission. We are committed to the educational process and overall well-being of all individuals interacting with our college and department. 
  • To provide high quality safety services to the campus community.
  • To maintain high standard of personal and professional ethics.
  • To embrace the importance of consultation, teamwork and open discussion with campus constituencies on comprehensive safety.
  • Practice prevention with all safety goals.
  • To appreciate and value diversity within the College.
  • We provide safety oversight to all 5 campuses 24/7 with 44 full-time officers, 3 campus Captains, an Assistant Director of Public Safety and Environmental Health, an Assistant Director of Patrol Operations and the  Director of Fire and Public Safety.
  • We respond to all law enforcement calls and maintain facility safety.  In 2011 we implemented an email system that allows us to know the nature of all 911 calls pertaining to our campus through Suffolk County 911 central dispatching for the Ammerman and Grant campuses. The Eastern Campus relies on the Southampton town 911 system, the Culinary Arts Center relies on the Riverhead town 911 system.

FOR EMERGENCIES CALL 911

TO CONTACT CAMPUS PUBLIC SAFETY 24/7 CALL (631) 451-4242

Email the Office of Public Safety

College Closure

Closure will be posted on the college homepage or by calling (631) 696-4910. Additionally, please tune to local radio stations (WBLI, WBAB, WALK and WLNG) as well as News 12 Long Island to determine if classes are cancelled. Be alert to the time and campus mentioned since closing or cancelling may involve only morning, afternoon or evening classes at a particular campus.

Parking Regulations

Speed Limit and Pedestrians

The speed limit is 15 miles per hour while on any College campus. Pedestrians have the right of way in all marked and striped pedestrian roadway crossings. Please be courteous and yield to pedestrians and oncoming vehicles.

Parking Lot Designations

WHITE: parking stalls are for students and visitors

RED: parking stalls are for faculty, staff and administrators

BLUE: parking stalls are for handicapped vehicles displaying the appropriate permit

Motor vehicles must be parked between the lines. Parking along any roadway or in restricted areas is not permitted. The College, having marked approved spaces, is under no obligation to mark all areas where parking is prohibited. Parking is permitted in designated spaces only. These spaces are marked by parallel lines.

Designated Restricted Areas:

Fire Zones (yellow): Areas within 15 feet of a fire hydrant or fire standpipe are fire zones. Each loading zone is also a fire zone. No parking is allowed in fire zones at any time.

Fire Lanes (yellow): Fire lanes in parking fields and elsewhere are identified by yellow striping. No parking or “standing” is permitted in these lanes at any time.

Parking for Physically Disabled (blue): Only those having a town or state permit may park in these areas.

Sidewalk and Grassland Areas: Motor vehicles may not be parked on any sidewalk. Parking on the grass is prohibited unless permitted by Public Safety personnel.

Disabled Vehicles

If your vehicle becomes disabled, notify Public Safety immediately. A disabled vehicle must be removed from the campus within 24 hours or it will be considered abandoned. If a vehicle is abandoned, it will be removed at the expense of the owner.

Enrollment Process

Applying and Being Admitted

New student looking for a degree? (Matriculated Student)

Whether you are a recent high school graduate or an adult learner changing careers, Suffolk County Community College has degree and certificate programs for you. Many of these programs provide opportunities to transfer or be admitted jointly to a four-year college or university. Here are a few reasons to choose Suffolk.

To help you explore your goal for attending Suffolk, visit Admissions Procedures. The admissions process takes only a few steps and applying online is quick and easy. Follow the Steps to Apply to get started.

Have your high school mail your official transcript to the Central Admissions Office to complete the application process. If you have a high school equivalency diploma, mail a copy of the diploma with scores to the Central Admissions Office. If you attended another college or plan to transfer credits, see Transfer Students.

For additional information, see the New Student Guide to Enrollment.

Eligibility

The College believes liberal admission requirements are an essential part of its philosophy and, in that context, has maintained a Full Opportunity Program of admission for many years. Full Opportunity means the College offers acceptance in an appropriate program to all applicants residing in Suffolk County who have graduated from an approved high school or hold the New York State High School Equivalency Diploma (or equivalent).

Applicants over the age of 18 who do not meet these requirements should contact one of the campus admissions offices for alternate admission procedures under the Ability to Benefit (ATB) program. These procedures include the testing of the applicant and counselor review of all testing data and academic credentials prior to the admission process. Federal guidelines on testing cut-off scores are utilized for admission purposes.

Students who wish to transfer to Suffolk County Community College from another college are accepted if they have left their previous institution in good academic standing. See Transfer Students for transferring in credits.

Some majors have special admission procedures and entrance requirements. Admission into these programs is based on factors such as completion of required prerequisites, grade point average, high school record, work experience and objective test data.

For majors with competitive admission requirements, preference may be given to students who complete their prerequisite course work at Suffolk County Community College. In addition, Suffolk County residents will be given preference over residents of other New York State counties for admission into competitive programs in those cases where the program is available in the student’s county of residence. Furthermore, applicants from outside New York State, including those from outside the United States, will be considered for admission to competitive/restricted programs only after the admission of all qualified Suffolk County and New York State applicants.

Specific admission requirements and application procedures for each of Suffolk County Community College’s curricula can be found in the individual detailed curriculum descriptions in the Curricula section of this catalog. Students enrolling in other than New York State registered or otherwise approved programs may jeopardize eligibility for financial aid.

Application Deadlines

The application deadline for new students is one week prior to the start of classes for both the fall and spring semesters. Nevertheless, applicants are urged to file their application by November 1 for spring admission and April 1 for fall admission in order to assure early consideration of their application and the greatest selection of program and course offerings. In addition, the following programs admit freshmen for the fall semester only and give preference to applications received by January 15: Nursing and Practical Nursing (except August 15 for select options), Occupational Therapy Assistant, Physical Therapist Assistant, and Veterinary Science Technology. Transfer students may be accepted for the spring into a competitive program on a case-by-case basis.

Matriculation

Matriculated Status

Matriculated status is granted to every student who is admitted into a degree or certificate program at Suffolk County Community College. Matriculation assures a student that the requirements for a particular program which are in effect at the time of matriculation will remain in effect until that student graduates.

Matriculated students may attend classes on a part-time (1-11.5 credits per semester) or full-time (12 or more credits per semester) basis and may schedule their classes during the days, evenings, weekends, or online on any of the college’s three campuses. To be eligible for financial aid, students must be matriculated and taking courses required for or applicable to their current degree program.

 

Loss of matriculation occurs if the student:

  • applied and was accepted to the College, but never attended.
  • was matriculated in a program with limited seat availability (e.g., Automotive Service Specialist, Automotive Business, Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair, Cybersecurity Information Assurance, Emergency Medical Technician: Paramedic, Nursing, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Toyota T-TEN Automotive Service, and Veterinary Science Technology) and did not attend during the semester of acceptance (excluding wintersession and summer session).
  • did not enroll in credit-bearing courses at the College for two or more consecutive semesters (excluding wintersession and summer session).
  • was academically dismissed or if the student’s matriculation status was rescinded for academic reasons.
  • graduated from Suffolk and is not subsequently pursuing an additional degree or certificate.
Non-Matriculated Status

Non-matriculated status is assigned to any student who wishes to take classes at Suffolk County Community College but who has not been admitted into a degree or certificate program or for a student who has lost matriculation status. Non-matriculated students can register for 1 through 11.5 credits per semester and are not eligible for financial aid.

Non-matriculated students in “good academic standing” must apply for admission or readmission to continue in a program and are required to follow the curriculum requirements for the term of application. Students who have previously attended Suffolk, but are not in good academic standing, must see a Campus Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for evaluation of readmitting into a program.

International Students

Admission of international students requires the issuance of a SEVIS I-20 form to qualify for F-1 non-immigrant student status in the United States. International students should contact the International Counselor's office or visit International Students for information and forms regarding international admissions.

International students outside of the United States may have their Suffolk County resident sponsor request a meeting with the International Counselor. International students are encouraged to file applications at least three months before the start of classes for both the fall and spring semesters.

Additional Information

Submitting Applications

Office of Admissions - 5 Easy Steps to Apply

Step 1: Choose a Program of Study

Suffolk offers approximately 100 programs of study from which to choose. For a complete list of associate degree and certificate programs, search our Programs of Study.

Step 2: Select a Campus

Once you have decided on a program of study, you will need to select a campus. The Ammerman Campus is located in Selden, the Eastern Campus is located in Riverhead, and the Michael J. Grant Campus is located in Brentwood. Directions and Maps

Most programs are offered on each campus, and some programs are offered on select campuses. Before applying, search for program-specific information in Programs of Study.

Step 3: Submit Your Application

It is recommended that you apply online. You will be required to enter your Social Security number and have a valid email address. Failure to submit your SSN will impact your eligibility for financial aid. Social Security numbers are also required for Federal Tax Reporting purposes.

If you do not have a Social Security number, or do not wish to supply it, you may download the application and mail it to the Central Admissions Office. 

You will need to submit a non-refundable application fee of $40 along with your application. Please make payment by check or money order payable to Suffolk County Community College. Do Not Send Cash.
Step 4. Send Additional Documents

Request and submit the following documents to the Central Admissions office. See address below.

  • Request an official transcript from your high school. If you received a High School Equivalency Diploma, send a copy of the diploma and scores.
  • If available, submit official ACT or SAT exam scores, Advanced Placement score report, or International Baccalaureate exam results.
  • Submit a copy of your immunization records.
  • Request official transcripts from each college attended, including college courses taken in high school, be sent to the Transfer Credit Evaluation Office at the same address. 
  • If your high school diploma was from outside the United States, submit an Educational Credential Evaluation from an accredited agency as listed below:

    National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES)

    Association of International Credentials Evaluators (AICE)

If you received an individualized Education Program (I.E.P) Diploma or a CDOS Commencement Credential, were home schooled, or earned your high school diploma online, please contact the Admissions Office at (631) 451-4000.

All admissions documents must be submitted to:

Suffolk County Community College

Central Admissions Office
533 College Road
Selden, NY 11784

Step 5. Apply for Financial Aid

You should begin the application process for financial aid as soon as possible. This will help to ensure your eligibility for the program for which you qualify. For more information on financial aid, refer to applying for Financial Aid.

Placement Testing and Course Selection

Suffolk County Community College believes accurate course placement will increase students’ chances of success. Therefore, newly admitted students may be required to take the Computerized Placement Tests (CPTs), which assess competence in reading, English and mathematics. Students transferring to Suffolk may also be required to take the CPTs, depending on their academic background.

After testing, students will be scheduled to meet with a counselor or faculty advisor to review their curriculum choice. On the basis of their test results and/or prior academic records, the student will be placed in appropriate courses.

Orientation

New students are strongly encouraged to attend an orientation program sponsored by the Campus Activities Offices prior to the beginning of classes every semester on each of the three campuses.

These orientation programs help new students make the transition into college by providing:

  • An opportunity to meet faculty, administrators, counselors, peer mentors and other new students, and
  • Information about academic policies and programs, student support services and student life opportunities.

The College offers a comprehensive online orientation program to supplement the in-person orientation which provides valuable information on numerous topics to new students. The online orientation is accessible here and in the student portal.

Immunization and Medical Requirements

New York State Public Health Law

In accordance with NYS Public Health Law Section 2165, all students enrolled for at least six (6) semester hours, or the equivalent, at Suffolk County Community College, who were born on or after January 1, 1957, are required to provide acceptable written proof of immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella in accordance with standards approved by the New York State Department of Health.
Student Immunizations Policy

Acceptable proof of immunity consists of a Certificate of Immunization (page 2) signed and stamped by a physician or licensed health care provider which documents measles, mumps, and rubella immunity. Students must submit this certificate or equivalent to the Health Services Office on their home campus and document at least partial compliance with the immunization requirements before they will be permitted to register for classes. Partial compliance shall be defined as one dose of measles, mumps, and rubella immunization.

In addition, proof of an honorable discharge from the armed services within 10 years prior to the date of application to Suffolk County Community College shall also qualify as a certificate enabling a student to attend classes pending actual receipt of immunization records from the armed services.

Students who are in partial compliance will be notified by the Vice President for Student Affairs that they will be suspended from their classes if they do not fully comply with the immunization requirements within the first 30 days of the semester (45 days for students transferring from another state or country). Students who are suspended and who subsequently fail to comply with the immunization requirements will be administratively withdrawn from their classes and prevented from registering for subsequent semesters.

Immunization records shall be maintained on each campus at the Health Services Office, which shall consider such information as confidential and subject to the College Records Policy and New York State Public Health laws. The Vice President for Student Affairs shall be responsible for the completion and timely submission to the Commissioner of Health of the annual survey of immunization levels of students attending Suffolk County Community College.

Students who cannot afford a private physician will be directed to the Suffolk County Health Department for information regarding free immunization clinics. Persons may be exempt from any or all of these requirements if a physician certifies in writing that the immunizations may be detrimental to their health (refer to Medical Exemption Form). In addition, persons who hold genuine and sincere religious beliefs which are contrary to immunization may be exempt after submitting a statement to that effect to the Dean of Student Services and to the Health Services office on their home campus (refer to Religious Exemptions below).

Should a suspected case of measles, mumps, or rubella occur on a campus, the Office of the Dean of Student Services will evaluate the case in conjunction with the County Health Department and the Health Services Office and consulting physician. While awaiting serological confirmation, immunization records will be reviewed and susceptible individuals identified. If the suspected case is confirmed, the Office of the Dean of Student Services will notify all susceptible students and staff to be immunized. Susceptible students who are unable to be immunized may be required to remain off campus until the Health Department deems it safe for such individuals to return.

This mandatory student immunization policy will be included in the college catalog and the campus student handbook.

Insurance

Health Insurance

Suffolk County Community College does not offer, endorse, or promote any health insurance plans for its students. As a courtesy only, the Health Services Offices may have information about private plans that are available to students.

Accident Insurance

Due to legal and regulatory changes related to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), as of Fall 2018, the College will no longer offer the Student Accident Insurance Plan (SAIP) to students. 

Based on these conditions, all students must now find their own private health insurance coverage. Individuals under the age of 26 may qualify for health insurance under a parent’s plan. Individuals may also be eligible to be covered under their parent’s plan until age 29 under State law if certain requirements are met. For more information, see the NYS Department of Financial Services website. Those who do not qualify for coverage under a parent’s health insurance policy should visit the New York State Health Plan Marketplace at https://nystateofhealth.ny.gov. By following the steps outlined on the website, students can identify and purchase healthcare coverage ideally suited to their own needs, as well as explore whether they qualify for free or low-cost coverage options and assistance that may be available to obtain coverage. Some students may not be able to obtain coverage through the Marketplace until the open enrollment period for 2019 coverage begins later this fall, but some students may qualify for a special enrollment period and, thus, be able to obtain coverage now, so we encourage students to research their eligibility and coverage options as soon as possible.

Please note that it is extremely important for students to obtain health insurance. The College encourages its students to pursue either: (a) coverage through a parent’s health insurance or; (b) a personal policy available through the online Marketplace. Students are responsible for their own health, and should take the time to find the ideal insurance options.

College Registration

Registration

Currently enrolled matriculated and non-matriculated students are eligible to register before the end of each semester for the following term. Registration may be conducted on the student portal via MySCCC or in person at the Campus Registrar Office. New matriculated students must register in person. After registering, students receive a schedule/bill. All students are responsible for verifying the content of their schedule/bill and making the appropriate tuition payment prior to the date listed. No student is considered enrolled until all tuition and fees are either paid in full or officially deferred.

Late Registration

A late registration fee is charged to students without a current schedule and who register one week prior to the official start of each session (Day, Evening, Saturday/Sunday) and continues through the first week of classes. Late Registration for a course is only permitted up until the course is scheduled to hold its first class meeting. Exceptions to this policy may only be approved by the College chief academic officer or designee.

Additional Information

Key Enrollment Dates:  Winter and Spring  |  Summer and Fall

Password Reset Request  |  Registrar FAQs 

Related Links

Paying Tuition

When should I pay my bill?

You must pay your bill by the due date printed on the bill. Otherwise, you will lose your schedule.

Where/How can I pay my bill?

  1. Online, through My SCCC; or
  2. by mail, to the address indicated on the bill; or
  3. in person, at any of the campus Cashier Offices.

Add/Drop Period

Students with a current class schedule are not charged a late fee to modify their existing schedules during the add/drop period. Some course offerings will not permit enrollment after the first class meeting. The College chief academic officer or designee will determine on a college-wide basis which courses will not admit students after the first class meeting based upon recommendations made by the campus executive deans. Otherwise, students are permitted to add a class up until the start of a class’s second week (e.g., prior to the third session of a class that meets twice a week or the second session of a class that meets once a week). Exceptions to this policy may only be approved by the College’s chief academic officer or designee.

Any student who enters a class after the first meeting, regardless of reason, is accountable for all course requirements including assignments and attendance.

A student may drop a course during the first three weeks of the semester during the official refund period. These courses will not appear on a student’s official transcript.

You may use the Add or Drop Form to make a change in your schedule during the designated drop/add period. Simply print the form, enter the course information in the spaces provided and bring to your campus Registrar Office in person. You must present your Suffolk ID card in order for your request to be processed. Unless you are required to have an advisor's signature, you may access online by selecting MySCCC to accomplish this transaction.

Download Add or Drop Form
Go to MySCCC

Transfer Agreements

Articulation Agreements with Four-Year Colleges and Universities

Suffolk County Community College prepares students for transfer to four-year colleges and universities. With the assistance of our counselors, students transition to a variety of baccalaureate programs here on Long Island, around New York State and throughout the nation. Suffolk has entered into articulation agreements with some of these colleges and universities. An articulation agreement signed by both Suffolk and a four-year partner school provides seamless transfer for students and ensures that credit is granted for all appropriate courses and programs of study. In all cases of transfer, a student should meet with a transfer counselor at his/her home campus and should confer with the transfer counselor of the four-year college or university. Articulation agreements are modified from time-to-time and students are advised to check the Transfer Agreement webpage periodically to see what new opportunities are available to them. Suffolk has also entered into joint admission agreements with some colleges and universities.

The course catalog description and learning outcomes for all Suffolk courses are available for review at Course Descriptions.

A College name in blue indicates that Suffolk and that institution have a "Joint Admission Agreement." Selecting the institution name will take you directly to that institution’s Admissions web site. Details of the agreement can be accessed by selecting the PDF icon found in the last column.

Transfer Student

Transferring to Suffolk from Another College?

Every year over 1,600 transfer students begin their studies at Suffolk County Community College by transferring college credits from other colleges and universities. Your transfer to Suffolk begins by applying online or, if you prefer, download the application.

Request your official college transcripts be sent directly to either the address below, or sent from your previous institution to transfercredits@sunysuffolk.edu.

Once your college transcript(s) have arrived, your transfer credits will be evaluated for applicable credits toward your program, and an official transfer evaluation will be mailed to you. You can also view your transferred courses in your Student Portal. You can view the Transfer Evaluation Tables to see unofficially how your courses may transfer. Grades for prior coursework accepted for Suffolk credit are not noted on our transcript, nor considered in computing the grade point average. However, grades for such courses may be used for admission decisions for curricula with competitive admission.

Suffolk also awards transfer credits from a number of different sources. Below is a brief description of the various ways students can receive college credit.

Students who avail themselves of these opportunities for advanced standing credit and/or receive transfer credit for prior coursework are required to complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of academic course work at Suffolk County Community College applicable to their associate degree curriculum.

Certificate programs require half of the required credits of academic coursework needed, to be earned at SUNY Suffolk County Community College.

Please email transfercredits@sunysuffolk.edu for further information. 

Steps on applying to College: 10 Steps to Enrollment Guide.

Colleges and Universities

Suffolk County Community College will recognize academic credit from colleges and universities that are accredited by regional institutional accrediting organizations, or national institutional accrediting organizations that are recognized by both the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) and the U.S. Department of Education.

Credit for coursework successfully completed with a grade of C minus (C-) or higher may be awarded for courses deemed equivalent to Suffolk County Community College courses. Exceptions exist to this rule for certain majors.

For institutions that have closed, please refer to Obtaining Closed School Student Records.

Advanced Placement (AP)

Credit may be awarded to students who have taken Advanced Placement courses in high school and have attained scores of 3 or higher on the appropriate Advanced Placement examinations administered through College Board.

To be awarded AP credit, request your official Advanced Placement score report from College Board, the college CEEB code is 2827, be sent to:

Suffolk County Community College
Transfer Credits
533 College Road
Selden, NY 11784-2899

International Baccalaureate

Credit may be awarded to students who have taken International Baccalaureate courses in high school and who attained a score of 4 or higher on the IBO higher level (HL) exams. If the student has successfully completed the diploma program, then credit may be awarded for the standard level (SL) courses as well with a score of 4 or higher. You may request an official transcript from the International Baccalaureate® (IB) website.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Credit may also be awarded to students who pass CLEP exams with a score of 50 or higher. CLEP examinations are offered throughout the year in group sessions at the Ammerman and Michael J. Grant campuses. Visit College Level Examination Program (CLEP) for more information.

Challenge Exam

When a CLEP examination is not available to test prior learning in a course or subject offered at Suffolk County Community College, the student may request, and the College may agree, to prepare and administer a special Challenge Examination for the student.

Portfolio Assessment

Portfolio Assessment is an alternative vehicle for defining, demonstrating and documenting college-level learning achieved outside the classroom. Students may take COL120: Portfolio Preparation, a one-credit course available in the fall and spring semesters. The course encompasses relevant academic content, skill development and ongoing guidance during the process of developing a learning portfolio. Upon completion of the course, students may submit the learning portfolio for evaluation for possible college credit. For additional information, read more about Portfolio Assessment.

Educational Programs Sponsored by Certain Non-Collegiate Organizations

Suffolk County Community College will recognize and may award academic credit for non-collegiate training if the training has been evaluated by either the National College Credit Recommendation Service (NCCRS) or the American Council on Education (ACE), and college level credit has been recommended by the aforementioned agencies. Students are required to submit an official ACE or NCCRS transcript for evaluation. For military personnel, an Official Joint Services Transcript (JST) should be submitted for review.

Foreign Credential Evaluations

Suffolk County Community College will recognize and may award credit for coursework successfully completed at a foreign college or university if the foreign institution is shown to be equivalent to a regionally accredited institution in the United States. A course-by-course evaluation (which includes a document-to-document evaluation) must be submitted by the student to the Office of Central Admissions (see address above) from a credential evaluation service that is a member of either the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) or the Association of International Credentials Evaluators (AICE).

Please note: For non F1 visa students, if your U.S. transcripts are not in English, they must be translated. All foreign educational credentials must be evaluated by an accredited agency (see below). Please visit the websites below for NACES and AICE to select one of the evaluation agencies:

National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES)

Association of International Credentials Evaluators (AICE)

The Educational Credential Evaluation must be sent to:

Suffolk County Community College
Central Admissions/Transfer Credit Department 
533 College Road
Selden, NY 11784-2899

Restrictions on Advanced Standing Credit

Where an appropriate standardized examination or Challenge Examination is available, students may be required to demonstrate prior learning by taking the examination in lieu of requesting credit by portfolio assessment.

The College will not award credit by examination, nor will it entertain petitions for credit by portfolio assessment, when to do so would jeopardize its accreditation by the relevant professional association.

Educational Opportunity Program (EOP)

Introduction

The Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) provides academic support and financial assistance to students who demonstrate the potential for mastering college-level work. EOP is mandated by the New York State Legislature and is funded by the State University of New York (SUNY).

Eligibility

To qualify for EOP, a student is required to:

  • be a resident of New York State for 12 months prior to enrollment
  • have a high school diploma or an equivalency diploma
  • demonstrate the need for additional academic preparation and have the potential for completing a college program
  • be in need of financial assistance within established income guidelines

Additional Academic Preparation

A need for additional academic preparation is defined by any one of the following:

  • a high school average of 70 to 83;
  • a General Equivalency Diploma (GED);
  • a non-high school graduate who is admitted to Suffolk through the Ability to Benefit program;
  • placement at Suffolk in one or more developmental courses;
  • a referral from an Educational Opportunity Center within the SUNY system

Potential for mastering college-level work is determined by a review of the student's high school record, all available test scores, and information about their extracurricular activities, hobbies, community activities, job history, and any other experiences that might indicate their potential for future success.

Services Offered

Individualized Services 

Specific services include the following:

  • academic advisement for course work planning
  • tutorial services (both individual and group)
  • assistance with financial aid application process
  • educational, career, and personal counseling
  • financial support for some personal expenses
  • academic skill-building workshops

Summer Program

All EOP freshman students are required to attend Suffolk's four-week summer orientation program to help enhance academic skills prior to the start of the fall semester.

  • reading, English, mathematics, and computer review classes
  • time management and study skills workshops
  • free breakfast and lunch
  • meet other EOP freshman students and campus personnel
  • transportation reimbursement at the end of the summer program

Refer to: How to Apply.

Student Support Services (SSS) – TRIO

The Student Support Services program enhances opportunities for students to successfully complete their college education. Through the development and implementation of a personal support plan, students receive assistance in identifying their educational goals and learning needs, as well as individual academic and financial advisement and tutoring.

Services Offered

Specific services offered include the following:

  • One-on-one assistance with academic needs
  • Academic Coaching
  • Instruction in basic study skills
  • Tutorial services
  • Assistance in applying for and maintaining financial aid eligibility
  • Information about career and transfer opportunities
  • Registration priority
  • Peer mentoring
  • Referral to campus resources
  • Workshops and Informational sessions

Eligibility

Applications to the Student Support Services (SSS) program will be considered on a first-come, first-served basis. Students must be in their first semester in the fall and full time (12 or more credits) in order to be considered. The program acceptance deadline is October 25th of each year. Please note that we are unable to accept students in the spring. Therefore, interested students should apply as early as possible. If you are interested in applying or would like to learn more about the SSS program on your campus, please contact your campus Student Support Services office. Students must meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • first generation college student
    (i.e., neither parent has graduated from college with a four-year degree.);
  • have a documented disability 

Developmental Studies

Goal

In order to support students with certain academic needs related to college readiness, Suffolk provides developmental courses in reading, mathematics, English or English as a Second Language (ESL). These courses are designed to help students refine scholastic skills, and, thereby, effect a smooth transition to college-level courses. While developmental courses do not carry credit toward a degree or certificate, successful completion of these courses is required and may serve as a prerequisite to enrollment in college-level programs at Suffolk. Developmental courses may lengthen the time needed to complete a degree program. However, faculty at Suffolk continue to develop multiple approaches to enable students to begin college-level course work in a timely manner.

Course Placement

Newly admitted full- and part-time matriculated students are enrolled in college-level or developmental-level courses based on scores earned on the required Computerized Placement Test (CPT), certain high school Regents exams, and other available test scores and measures. Students entering Suffolk who have completed appropriate college-level courses may be waived from part or all of the CPT requirement.

Scores on placement tests may determine that students need to enroll in one or more of the following developmental courses, which do not fulfill degree requirements:

ENGLISH
ENG009: Basic English Skills
ENG010: Developmental Writing
ENG011: Enhanced Writing Skills
ENG012: Emerging Writers Workshop

MATHEMATICS
MAT001: Developmental Mathematics Skills
MAT006: Pre-Algebra and Algebra I
MAT007: Algebra I
MAT009: Mathematical Literacy

READING
RDG096: Essential College Reading
RDG098: Introduction to College Reading
RDG099: Reading in the Content Areas

In addition, students for whom English is a second language may be required to take any or all of the following:

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
ESL011-012: ESL College Reading I and II
ESL013-014: ESL Intensive Grammar I and II
ESL015-016: ESL College Listening Speaking Skills I and II
ESL017-018: ESL College Composition I and II

Enrollment Requirements

Students required to take developmental courses in two or more subject areas or one developmental course at the lower-level English, reading, or ESL (ENG009/ESL017 or RDG098/RDG096/ESL011) may enroll in up to 14.5 credit hours per semester which would include the required developmental courses and courses from the student’s chosen curriculum. Courses are arranged by the counseling staff in consultation with the student. Students enrolled in developmental courses may drop or add courses only after written approval by a faculty advisor, counselor, Academic Chair, or Associate Academic Dean.

Full-time students placed into developmental reading, English, or mathematics courses must register for them during the first semester. If two levels of a developmental courses are required, students successful at the lower-level must continue to the higher-level during the subsequent semester. Students earning a U, R, or W must repeat the lower-level course before moving on to the higher-level.

Part-time students placed into two or more developmental courses may take them in conjunction with certain approved courses. Students placed only in developmental mathematics are required to take it during the student’s first semesters.

New students who are applying for financial aid with state aid eligibility must earn at least 3 college-level credits toward their current degree. In the subsequent semester the student must earn at least 6 college-level credits toward their current degree.

Any grade issued for a developmental course is binding. A test and retest score on the CPT cannot be used to substitute for or replace an earned grade.

English as a Second Language (ESL)

Suffolk County Community College recognizes that students who are non-native speakers of English may require specialized English language instruction. As a result, extensive course offerings in English as a Second Language (ESL) are available at each of the campuses.

The three ESL programs offer instruction in listening, speaking, reading, writing and grammar to students for whom English is a second language. The ESL programs include both part-time and full-time developmental classes on a noncredit basis* and a third program which offers developmental classes on a credit** basis. The aim of all three programs is to provide limited English-proficient students with a functional knowledge of the English language.

The programs furnish students with the necessary communication skills to secure gainful employment, perform more effectively in daily life situations, and enroll in further college-level courses, if they so desire. Inasmuch as Suffolk County offers employment opportunities in business and industry as well as academic options, the ESL programs are aimed at making these opportunities accessible to their students. Instruction consists of sequenced levels, each of which is a prerequisite for the next level. These levels are divided into sections that focus on the four linguistic skill areas: speaking, listening, reading and writing.

* Students should be aware that all ESL courses, credit or non-credit, are considered developmental. Therefore, they do not fulfill any degree or certificate requirements.

** Plus 3 or 6 college-level credits for financial aid eligibility.

We have two different ESL options to help you. Look at the questions below to decide which one is best for you.
  • Did you graduate high school in the United States?
  • Are you an advanced student of English?
  • Have you finished the Non-Credit ESL option (Advanced IEP or Level 4.5)?
  • Do you want to obtain an associates or bachelor's degree?

If you answered yes to three or more of the questions above, we recommend that you start with the Credit ESL Program.

If you didn't answer yes to three or more questions above, we recommend that you start with the Non-Credit ESL Program. This option is for beginning to intermediate students of English.

If you are an international student, visit International student.

If you are still not sure which option would be best for you or if you have questions, please contact an advisor for assistance. 

Non-Credit ESL Program
Academic Credit ESL Program
 Intensive English Program (IEP) English Language Learners (ELL) Matriculated (degree-seeking)  Non-Matriculated (not degree-seeking)
 Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced Level 1.0, ... 3.4, 4.5   Level I and II Level I and II
Full-time (18 hours per week / 12 week semester) Part-time (6 hours per week / 12 week semester) Full-time or part-time / 15 week semester Part-time (3 hours per week / 15 week semester)

 

 

Non-Credit Program

As we wait for the governor's decision on classes for the fall, Suffolk County Community College will continually offer updates for our students. We understand your concerns at this time. We will be happy to assist you in your registration for the summer and fall as you can call one of our offices on the right side of this page.

Summer classes begin July 6, 2020 and will be taught remotely.

Students who need assistance online or who are interested in non-credit ESL classes can call:

(631) 451-4859 Selden
(631) 548-2645 Riverhead
(631) 851-6519 Brentwood

If you are an adult for whom English is a second language, Suffolk County Community College English as a Second Language program can change your life. If you would like to learn English to:

  • Communicate more effectively
  • Earn higher wages
  • Be considered for a promotion
  • Continue your education towards a degree

Then Suffolk has the best English program for you.

What do I need to do to take a placement test to take ESL classes? 

  • Speak to someone in the ESL office who will determine if a placement test is appropriate based on the student’s language proficiency. 
    • Selden: (631) 451-4859
    • Riverhead: (631) 548-2645
    • Brentwood: (631) 851-6519
  • Fill out demographic info and get assigned a student ID#.  You will need the student ID# to access the test. 
  • Make an appointment to take the reading comprehension (section 1) and grammar (section 2of the test in Blackboard.  Students will be given a range of days within which they can complete the two sections of the test.  At this time, they will also make an appointment to take the Oral and Written sections of the test.  SECTION 1 and SECTION 2 MUST BE COMPLETED before the Oral and Written sections. 
  • *Once all four sections of the test are taken, students will be given a date to call/visit ESL office for results. 

The ESL non-credit English Program and Intensive English Program at Suffolk County Community College provide high- quality English as a Second Language instruction to equip second-language learners with the linguistic ability necessary to thrive academically, professionally and socially. Our programs foster strong English language acquisition through creative, yet structured, instruction in a positive and welcoming learning environment.

Our program has helped many people to develop their English-language skills, so why not give it a try?

Students are placed in classes that are tailored to their English ability, and each semester they advance through the levels and modules to prepare them to continue their education at Suffolk County Community College or at another college or university.

Part-Time and Full-Time Programs

The part-time non-credit ESL program consists of four levels and the full-time Intensive English Program (IEP) consists of three levels. In both programs, each level is a prerequisite for the next. The only requirements to enter either program are that students be at least 18 years of age and take a placement test in order to determine their level of proficiency and appropriate placement in a level.

The part-time non-credit ESL program is for those students who:

  • have not enrolled at the College in a degree program
  • are seeking a less expensive option
  • are able to devote only a limited number of hours per week to study
  • have language skills at the most basic level
  • are seeking to improve language skills for vocational or social reasons
  • are unsure of future academic goals

The full-time non-credit Intensive English Program is for those students who:

  • want or need to dedicate a significant number of hours per week toward language acquisition
  • are preparing for college or university study
  • wish to increase their career options

ESL Program Semester (non-credit):

The semester lasts 12 weeks for both programs. Each week, students in the part-time program must attend class for 6 hours and also complete one hour of language lab for a total of 7 hours per week. Depending of the campus, classes are offered during the day, in the evening and on the weekend. Students in the full-time Intensive English Program must attend class for 18 hours per week and complete two hours of language lab for a total of 20 hours a week. The Intensive English Program has both day and evening offerings.

Part-Time ESL Program

Level 1:

Module 1.0                                               per week

Comprehensive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours

Language Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 hour

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 hours

Module 1.1A

Listening/Speaking/Reading. . . . . . 3 hours

Module 1.1B

Writing/Grammar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours

Language Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 hour

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 hours

Module 1.2A

Grammar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours

Module 1.2B

Reading/Writing

Listening/Speaking. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours

Language Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 hour

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 hours 

Level 2:

Module 2.3A

Grammar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours

Module 2.3B

Reading/Writing

Listening/Speaking. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours

Language Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 hour

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 hours 

Level 3:

Module 3.4A

Writing/Grammar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours

Module 3.4B

Reading/Listening/Speaking. . . . . . 3 hours

Language Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 hour

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 hours

Level 4:

Module 4.5

Comprehensive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours

Language Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 hour

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 hours

Total Program Time: 6 semesters/504 hours

 

Full-Time Intensive English Program (IEP)

Beginner:                                               per week

Comprehension and Speaking. . . . 6 hours

Grammar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours

Reading/Writing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6 hours

Language Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 hours

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 hours

Intermediate:

Comprehension and Speaking . . .  4 hours

Grammar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 hours

Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 hours

Writing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 hours

Language Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 hours

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 hours

Advanced:

Comprehension and Speaking. . . .  3 hours

Grammar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours

Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4 hours

Writing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 hours

Language Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 hours

American Culture or TOEFL Prep. . 3 hours

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 hours

Total Program Time: 3 semesters/720 hours

 

Upon successful completion of either Level 4 or the Advanced IEP of the non-credit program, an exit test is given and students are encouraged to pursue college-level work. Students who successfully complete the program also participate in the ESL graduation ceremony. At that time they receive a Certificate of Program Completion which recognizes their achievement.

*Students should be aware that all ESL courses, credit or non-credit, are considered developmental and therefore do not fulfill any degree or certificate requirements.

Academic Credit Program

We offer intensive academic prep courses designed to prepare students, whose first language is not English, for college-level work in degree programs.

Students may take the full sequence of classes or they may take only those for which they demonstrate or experience a need. Courses are prescribed according to placement test scores; not all courses may be required and students may be encouraged to take courses in appropriate academic disciplines to augment their course schedules.

The credit ESL program is for students who:

  • have been accepted by Suffolk for full- or part-time admission.
  • are applying for financial aid (for state aid eligibility, new students must earn at least 3 college-level credits toward their current degree, while students in subsequent semesters must earn at least 6 college-level credits toward their current degree).
  • are seeking a more intensive program of study for academic or professional reasons.
  • need intensive instruction in any of the above-named skill areas.
  • need specialized ESL classes based on results of the Computerized Placement Tests.
  • have completed the non-credit ESL program and need additional focused course work to enable them to continue their studies.

Finances

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and Residency

The College charges full-time tuition to students who take 12 or more credits per semester. Students who take fewer than 12 credits are charged on a per credit basis.

The College has two tuition rates: resident tuition, charged to Suffolk County residents and non-resident tuition, charged to all non-Suffolk County residents. Non-resident tuition is currently double the resident tuition rate. To qualify for resident tuition, a student must have legal domicile of one year in New York State and six months in Suffolk County. The legal residency of unmarried students under the age 21 is that of their parents. Suffolk County permanent residents with valid Permanent Resident Cards (“green cards”) are charged resident tuition as long as they meet the residency requirements indicated above.

New York State residents who live in other counties may be eligible for the resident tuition rate. To qualify, they must submit a Certificate of Residence from their home county prior to registration. Applications are available at the college’s business office and online via MySCCC. Students must file their applications with their home county’s Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer no more than two months before the start date of the semester (no later than 30 days after the start of classes for some counties). A Certificate of Residence is valid for no more than one year and must be renewed every year. The Certificate of Residence must be returned to the College in person or by mail to any campus business/cashier’s office, or to the College’s Office of Business and Financial Services, Room 232, NFL Building, Ammerman Campus, 533 College Road, Selden, NY 11784 or by fax to 631-451-4444.

Non-Suffolk residents who do not comply with the Certificate of Residence requirement and non-Suffolk residents in the United States on a student visa who are ineligible for the Certificate of Residence are responsible for the full non-resident tuition.

For terms that begin after July 1, 2017, under the GI Bill, a veteran who enrolls at the College within three years of discharge from a period of active duty service of 90 days or more will pay resident tuition. There are no longer any residency requirements, or non-resident tuition charges for veterans or their eligible dependents using the covered GI Bill programs.

12 Credits or More per Semester

Tuition and fees are subject to change pending final action on the College budget.

Tuition, Residents
$2,735
per semester

For tuition purposes, Residents are defined as students who have one year's legal residency in New York State and six months in Suffolk County. The legal residency of unmarried students under 21 is that of their parents. Students who are New York State residents in a county other than Suffolk may have the non-resident tuition rate waived by submitting a Certificate of Residency from their home county prior to registration.

Tuition, Non-Residents
$5,470
per semester

For tuition purposes, Non-Residents are defined as non-New York State residents, or New York State residents who have not resided in Suffolk County for six months. Note that New York State residents of other counties may have the non-resident tuition rate waived by submitting a Certificate of Residency from their home county prior to registration.

Tuition Deposit
$100
 

The Tuition Deposit is a non-refundable payment that is required from students who are admitted to programs at the College. The deposit will be applied to the payment of tuition in the first semester that the student registers following the payment of the deposit. If the student does not register and attend classes within one year of paying the deposit, the deposit will be forfeited.

Late Registration Fee
$30
per session

Students who initiate their registration one week prior to the first day of a session (Day, Evening, Saturday/Sunday) are charged this fee. It is not charged to registered students who change an existing course schedule.

Technology Fee
$150
per semester

The Technology Fee is a dedicated fee charged to students taking credit courses offered by the College. The fee is committed to fund technology and equipment; it is non-refundable on or after the first day of the session.

Fewer Than 12 Credits per Semester

–Tuition and fees are subject to change pending final action on the College budget.–

Tuition, Residents
$228
per credit

For tuition purposes, Residents are defined as students who have one year's legal residency in New York State and six months in Suffolk County. The legal residency of unmarried students under 21 is that of their parents. Students who are New York State residents in a county other than Suffolk may have the non-resident tuition rate waived by submitting a Certificate of Residency from their home county prior to registration.

Tuition, Non-Residents
$456
per credit

For tuition purposes, Non-Residents are defined as non-New York State residents, or New York State residents who have not resided in Suffolk County for six months. Note that New York State residents of other counties may have the non-resident tuition rate waived by submitting a Certificate of Residency from their home county prior to registration.

Late Registration Fee
$20
per session

Students who initiate their registration one week prior to the first day of a session (day, evening, Saturday or Sunday) are charged this fee. It is not charged to registered students who change an existing course schedule.

Technology Fee
$75
per semester

The Technology Fee is a dedicated fee charged to students taking credit courses offered by the College. The fee is committed to fund technology and equipment; it is non-refundable on or after the first day of the session.

Technology Fee, Summer
$75
per session

The Technology Fee is a dedicated fee charged to students taking credit courses offered by the College. The fee is committed to fund technology and equipment; it is non-refundable on or after the first day of the session.

Technology Fee, Wintersession
$20
per session

The Technology Fee is a dedicated fee charged to students taking credit courses offered by the College. The fee is committed to fund technology and equipment; it is non-refundable on or after the first day of the session.

Fees, Fines, and Charges

Bookstore Charges

Students who authorize the College to set aside funds to pay for materials purchased from the College bookstore vendor, whether authorized by third party payees or as set-asides from their financial assistance and/or scholarship funds, may see these Bookstore Charges on their billing statements from the College.

Challenge Examination Fee

The Challenge Examination Fee is a non-refundable fee that is charged for each examination that is taken. Challenge examinations are not available for all courses. Additional information is available in the Office of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs on each campus.

Child Care Tuition and Fees

Students who authorize the College to set aside funds to cover Child Care Tuition and Fees, whether authorized by third party payees or as set-asides from their financial assistance and/or scholarship funds, may see these charges on their billing statements from the College.

College-Level Examination Program Fee

The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) Fee is a non-refundable fee that covers the cost of administering each examination. Successful performance on these standardized tests, which cover many of the subjects and courses offered at Suffolk, can result in the awarding of college credit. There is a service charge to students who reschedule CLEP examinations.

Corporate Training-Program Charges

Corporations, organizations, and other entities that contract for the services and instructional programs of the College Corporate Training Center pay Corporate Training-Program Charges to recover the cost of program-related expenses, instructional materials, curriculum development, and other costs associated with the center's operation.

Emergency Student Loan Charges

Students who receive emergency student loans that need to be paid back to the College will see these Emergency Student Loan Charges included on their billing statements from the College.

Equestrian Fee

Students enrolled in equestrian courses pay the Equestrian Fee to cover the cost of materials and supplies used in that course.

ID Card Non-Compliance Fee

Pursuant to College policy, students who do not get an ID Card will be charged an ID Card Non-Compliance Fee.
This fee will be waived for Fall 2020.

Library Fines

Students and others who return books and other instructional materials late to the lending services at the College, including its libraries and audio-visual services, pay Library Fines or lost-item replacement charges. Lost-item replacement charges will be refunded if the items are returned within one year.

Meal Plan

A non-refundable charge upon students on the Ammerman and the Michael J. Grant Campuses enrolled for nine or more credits in a semester.
This fee will be waived for Fall 2020.

Non-Credit Tuition and Fee Charges

Students, individuals and organizations that enroll members or employees in non-credit programs of the College are charged Non-Credit Tuition and Fees to recover cost of the programs they take.

Ophthalmic Dispensing Fee

On a fee-for-services basis, the College Ophthalmic Dispensing Program at the Grant Campus provides eyeglass prescription services to individuals who, directly or through their health care provider, use this service. Unpaid Ophthalmic Dispensing Charges will be billed to the payees of record.

Prior Learning Assessment Fee

The Prior Learning Assessment Fee is a non-refundable fee that is charged to cover the cost of evaluating a learning portfolio for possible college credit. If college credit is granted, an additional Supplementary Fee that equals one-third the tuition of the credits granted is charged.

Sports Center Membership Fees

Students, College staff, faculty, senior citizens, police officers and recruits, high school students, family groups, Suffolk County residents, and residents of other counties who renew their membership at the College Health Club may receive bills for Sports Center Membership Fees from the College.

Sports and Convention Center Charges

Companies and other parties who contract for the use of the trade show facilities at the Suffolk Federal Credit Union Arena must pay an initial installment for their use of the facility. Subsequently, they will be billed for any additional amounts due to reflect their final Sports and Convention Center Charges.

Traffic Fines

Traffic Fines will be charged to individuals who violate the College vehicle use and parking rules. Violators may be ticketed and assessed parking and other traffic fines.

Third-Party Charges

The College may make provisions for students to take its courses in certain situations where other entities (e.g., governmental agencies, financial aid or scholarship programs, other private or non-profit groups, etc.) commit to paying all or part of their tuition and fees. The College bills such firms for the amounts due. However, in some instances, third party payment is contingent on the student completing the course, or is limited to certain pre-authorized and or set amounts, or may vary (for whatever reason) from the amount initially anticipated. When this occurs, the student is liable for the unpaid amount and will be billed accordingly by the College. These Third-Party Charges, like all other liabilities to the College, must be paid in full upon notice by the College.

English as a Second Language (ESL) Non-Credit Tuition

Course Cost Schedule
ELL001, ELL010 $410 per semester
ELL003, ELL005, ELL007, ELL008 $205 per semester
ELL002, ELL004, ELL006, ELL009 $205 per semester
ELW001, ELW002, ELW003, ELW004, ELW005,
ELW006, ELW007, ELW008, ELW009, ELW016

$175

per semester
IEP074, IEP084 $2,055 per semester
IEP094 and either IEP092 or IEP093 $2,055 per semester
IEP092, IEP093 $240 per semester

Deferral of Tuition

Financial Aid Deferral

Students who qualify for financial assistance or loans from state, federal or private agencies may be permitted, on a case-by-case basis, to defer payment of tuition and fees until receipt of such financial aid, but in no case beyond the end of the semester.

Third-Party Deferral

A tuition payment deferral is a privilege extended to a student by the College and can be withdrawn at the discretion of the College. In addition, if third party payment is not received, the College reserves the right to demand payment from the student. Funds from any source may be used by the College for payment of any and all deferred or outstanding charges. It is the student’s responsibility to follow through on all financial aid paperwork to ensure timely completion of the process.

Tuition Payment Plan

Introduction

Suffolk has a tuition payment plan (TPP) that allows students to pay their tuition and fees in three installments. The initial payment is one-third of the amount due plus the $50 plan enrollment fee. The second payment covers an additional one-third and is due four weeks into the semester. The final one-third payment is due approximately four weeks later at the mid-point of the semester. A $30 late fee is charged for any payment not made on or before its due date.

Important information about the TPP

  • By signing up for the TPP, you agree to accept liability for any unpaid balance.
  • TPP is available only for the fall and spring semesters.
  • You can use the TPP to cover any remaining amount due after financial aid or scholarships are applied.
  • If you add or drop courses after signing up for the TPP, the amount due for the second and third payments will be changed accordingly.
  • You are responsible for paying your bill on time even if reminder notices haven't been received.
  • The plan enrollment fee and any late fees are not refundable.
  • If you are 17 years of age or below, you must have a parent or guardian sign and accept liability on your behalf.
  • Students who do not pay their tuition and fees are liable for any charges that result from dunning and collection, including the fees paid to the college’s collection agency, legal fees and interest.

When the TPP is not available

  • Students who owe less than the cost of three credits.
  • Students taking non-credit courses.
  • Students taking credit or non-credit courses during the summer or wintersession.
  • Students who owe money from a prior semester.
  • Students who show a history of two or more late payments or bounced checks.

How to sign up for the TPP

  • Log into MySCCC to sign up online and pay the amount required by credit card; or
  • Pay bill at the Cashier's Office on any campus.

Refund Policy

Refund Policy Overview

Suffolk County Community College has a refund policy that conforms to the State University of New York's policy for community colleges. Generally speaking, students who drop a course during the College official drop/refund period may be entitled to a partial refund of their tuition and any refundable fees. The date the course is dropped will determine the percentage of tuition and fees refunded. Students must officially drop a course either online in MySCCC or by completing the Drop/Add Form in the campus Registrar's Office.

Important Information about the Refund Policy

  • Failure to attend classes, informing the instructor of withdrawal, or stopping payment on a check does not constitute either official notification to the college or withdrawal from your courses.
  • Refunds are based on the length of classes and the date of the start of the semester by day or evening sessions in which the classes were taken.

For classes more than eight weeks in length or longer, the percentage of tuition and fees refunded is:

  1. 100% - prior to the first day of the semester
  2.   75% - during the first week of classes
  3.   50% - during the second week of classes
  4.   25% - during the third week of classes
  5.     0% - after the third week of classes

For classes that last eight weeks or less, the percentage of tuition and fees refunded is:

  1. 100% - prior to the first day of the session
  2.   25% - during the first week of classes
  3.     0% - after the first week of classes

The above schedules apply to credit and non-credit courses and programs given by the college.

  • If you paid your bill by cash, check, or credit card, you will receive a check from the college after the three-week refund period for any refund for which you are entitled (i.e., after any debts to the college have been satisfied).
  • If you deferred payment of your tuition and fees through financial aid, loans, or another third party, then your 'refund' will actually be in the form of a reduction in your liability to the college.
  • Certain fees are not refundable at any time. These include the Application Fee, Tuition Deposit, Placement Testing/Advisement Fee, Late Registration Fee, Returned Check Fee, Records Management Fee, Web Access Fee, and all Tuition Payment Plan Fees.
  • Fees that are non-refundable on or after the first day of the session (semester) include the Technology Fee, Vehicle Registration Fee, Graduation Review Fee, and Liability Insurance Fee.
  • Fees that are partially refundable, according to the date of official withdrawal, include the Laboratory / Equipment / Special Program / Distance Education / Physical Education Service Fees.

Exceptions to the Refund Policy

Under very limited circumstances, students may request refunds after the end of the refund periods. Requests are not considered for students who attended beyond the midpoint of the semester, nor are they considered if they are submitted more than thirty days following the end of the semester affected. If these time frames are met, the College may make exceptions to the refund policies for students affected by serious illness, who experience death in their immediate family, or are called to military service. To be considered under these circumstances, students may submit the Request for a Refund/Adjustment of Financial Liability form. The form is available on the student portal at MySCCC and must be submitted to the office of the Associate Dean of Student Services on the campus of attendance. Circumstances such as minor illness, general financial difficulties, job changes or conflicts, and transportation issues, or complaints about course content or instructional methodology are not sufficient to justify exceptions to the general refund policy.

Special Refund Provisions for Federal Financial Aid Recipients

Federal financial aid, including loans, is recalculated for students who totally withdraw before sixty (60) percent of the semester is complete to reflect the period of actual attendance. For example, a student who attends for only thirty (30) percent of a semester is entitled to only thirty (30) percent of the aid and/or loans awarded. As a result, students whose accounts were credited with more than their adjusted aid award and/or loan can owe the college money. When this occurs, students are billed and liable for the amounts due. This process is known as Return of Title IV and is compliant by the Department of Education.

In those cases where a student does not meet their financial obligation, the College employs the service of collection agencies. If an account is sent to collections, the student is responsible for all associated costs including interest, contingency fees, legal fees, and administrative fees if the account is returned uncollected. Fees associate with collection of a delinquent account can be as much as one third of the balance in default at the time of collection. Students are also advised that their academic records will be placed on hold prior to the end of the semester if all charges are not paid. Grades and transcripts will be withheld until full payment is made and students will be blocked from registering for a future semester.

Financial Aid

Applying for Aid

Are you confused about the financial aid process and how to apply?  Please join us as we offer remote financial aid workshops you can attend from anywhere. The Financial Aid 101 session provides participants with a general overview of the financial aid process, basic eligibility requirements, types of aid programs available, and additional resources for students. The Financial Aid 102 session takes participants step-by-step through all parts of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). We welcome all students, parents, and guidance counselors who would like to know more.

There are numerous sessions available. Use the link below to view the schedule and to register. Shortly before the scheduled session, you will receive a Zoom invitation, sent to the email address you provide when you register, that will provide all the meeting details.

Click here to register for Financial Aid 101 and 102 Workshops


2020-2021 New York State Excelsior Scholarship application opens July 20th and is scheduled to close August 31, 2020.

New York State financial aid applicants planning to attend college full time during 2020-21 may want to apply for the Excelsior Scholarship Application at hesc.ny.govThe Excelsior Scholarship, in combination with other student financial aid programs, allows students to attend Suffolk County Community College tuition-free.


To receive full consideration for all financial aid programs, we urge you to apply by April 15 for the fall semester and by November 15 if you are entering in the spring semester. For all the major financial aid programs, including PELL, SEOG, TAP, APTS, loans, etc. Follow these steps to apply:

  1. All aid applicants must be matriculated in a degree or certificate program. Only courses that are required for your degree program are eligible for financial aid.
  2. You and your parent must obtain a FSA ID and password. The FSA ID serves as a legal signature and should not be shared with anyone. 

    If you are creating a FSA ID for the first time, your FSA ID is considered conditional until your information is verified with the Social Security Administration. You may use your conditional FSA ID to sign an original FAFSA, but nothing else. Once your information is verified with Social Security Administration you will be able to use your FSA ID to fully access your financial aid information. Access FSA ID now and get started applying.
  3. Complete the FAFSA:
    File electronically at FAFSA on the web. Each campus has a Computer Lab where assistance is available. Our Title IV School Codes are:
    • 002878 - Ammerman Campus
    • 014153 - Eastern Campus
    • 013204 - Grant Campus
  4. If you are requesting a loan and you are a first time borrower at Suffolk County Community College, you must complete an Entrance Interview either by using online loan counseling at studentloans.gov or in person at your campus Financial Aid Office.
  5. After you submit FAFSA, apply for the New York State TAP grant by clicking on State Aid Link on the confirmation page.
  6. To apply for a NYS Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS) award, you must complete an APTS Application in addition to the FAFSA. Return the application and a signed copy of your NY State Tax Return to your campus Financial Aid Office. If you are a dependent, please also include your parent's return.

Withdrawal or Change of Status

Students who wish to withdraw from the College or change their status from full time to part time must complete the Course Withdrawal form. All financial aid recipients are encouraged to contact their campus Financial Aid office to discuss any potential impacts of enrollment changes on their financial aid eligibility. Failure to follow the proper withdrawal procedures will result in the student being financially liable for full tuition and fees. Federal financial aid cannot pay students' charges for a class or classes the student attended or stopped attending, unless official withdrawal procedures were followed. A student who withdraws from the College may lose federal financial aid, based on the date of withdrawal. A student who withdraws after the 60% point in the term will not have a federal aid reduction.

Rights and Responsibilities

General Academic Requirements for Financial Aid (Full-time and Part-time Students)

To receive financial aid from the student aid programs you must meet the following conditions:
  1. Have financial need (i.e., except for some loan programs)
  2. Have a high school diploma or hold a NYS High School Equivalency Diploma (HSE - formerly known as GED). As of July 1, 2012, students admitted under the Ability to Benefit (ATB) are no longer eligible for Federal Aid
  3. Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment in a degree or certificate program (i.e., matriculated and taking courses applicable for that degree or certificate)
  4. Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen
  5. Have a valid Social Security Number
  6. Have filed and signed a statement on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) certifying that you will use federal student aid only for educational purposes
  7. Neither be in default on a federal student loan nor owe money back on a federal student grant
  8. Have registered with the Selective Service, if required (Males age 18-25 can register by checking a box on the FAFSA or by visiting the Selective Service web site)
  9. Meet the federal and state standards for satisfactory academic progress. Please click the Maintaining Eligibility tab above.
Your eligibility also may be verified by government agencies as follows:
  • Social Security Administration for verification of social security numbers, correct name, and U.S. citizenship status
  • Selective Service System for verification of Selective Service registration status, when applicable
  • Department of Homeland Security (Immigration and Naturalization Service) for verification of eligible non-citizenship status, when applicable
  • Department of Justice for verification that a student has not been denied federal student aid by the courts as the result of a drug-related conviction
  • Veterans Administration for verification of veterans status, when applicable, to determine dependent/independent status and discharge status
  • Department of Education to validate accuracy of financial information for all students identified by U.S. Department of Education.
  1. Students must be enrolled in a degree or certificate program (matriculated) to receive financial aid.
  2. To qualify for TAP, you must be full-time (12 or more credits). First time recipients who require remedial coursework must take at least three (3) college level credits, and six (6) college level credits in all subsequent terms.
  3. To qualify for APTS, students must enroll in at least three (3) college level credits each semester.
  4. State financial aid is not awarded for repeated courses for which you have received a passing grade.
  5. Financial aid is not awarded for courses that are being "audited."
  6. Financial aid is awarded only for courses that are required for the student's degree or certificate program. Financial aid does not cover prerequisites.
  7. Students are expected to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards to maintain financial aid eligibility. Refer to progress standards for Academic Progress charts.
Repeat Coursework

Federal financial aid will pay for only one repeat if you have previously earned credit in a course with a passing grade (A, B, C, D, etc.). You are only eligible to receive financial aid the first time the course is repeated. For example, if you are registered for 12 credits, and one of your 3-credit courses is a third attempt (after receiving a passing grade in an earlier attempt) your financial aid will be based on 9 credits and you will not be able to receive aid based on full-time enrollment. A second repeat is counted even if you received an incomplete grade.

State financial aid will not pay for repeated courses if you have previously earned credit with a grade of A, B, C, D, etc.

Appeal Process

After grades are evaluated at the end of each semester, financial aid recipients who fall below the satisfactory academic progress standards will be notified as follows:

  1. Students are notified of their loss of eligibility and the possibility of appealing.
  2. Students who are receiving state funds can apply for a waiver provision. Such a waiver can only be granted once during the students undergraduate career.
  3. Federal aid recipients may also apply for a Conditional Waiver. If granted, students may continue to receive financial aid.
  4. Waiver requests are reviewed by a campus committee that determines whether or not the academic difficulty was due to a serious extenuating situation (e.g. serious medical problems, death in family, disability etc.). Documentation of all extenuating situations is required.
  5. Since the waiver is neither automatic nor an entitlement, the judgment of the waiver committee will be final. Students will receive the decision of the committee in writing.

See Student Appeal Form to apply for an appeal.

Requirements for Satisfactory Academic Progress (Federal Aid)
*Total Successful Grade   *Total Successful Grade
Course Hours Accrued Point   Course Hours Accrued Point
Attempted Credits Average   Attempted Credit Average
8 – 9 6 1.6   53 – 54 36 2.0
10 7 1.6   55 37 2.0
11 – 12 8 1.6   56 – 57 38 2.0
13 9 1.6   58 39 2.0
14 – 15 10 1.6   59 – 60 40 2.0
16 11 1.7   61 41 2.0
17 – 18 12 1.7   62 – 63 42 2.0
19 13 1.7   64 43 2.0
20 – 21 14 1.7   65 – 66 44 2.0
22 15 1.7   67 45 2.0
23 – 24 16 1.7   68 – 69 46 2.0
25 17 1.7   70 47 2.0
26 – 27 18 1.7   71 – 72 48 2.0
28 19 1.7   73 49 2.0
29 – 30 20 1.7   74 – 75 50 2.0
31 21 1.8   76 51 2.0
32 – 33 22 1.8   77 – 78 52 2.0
34 23 1.8   79 53 2.0
35 – 36 24 1.8   80 – 81 54 2.0
37 25 1.8   82 55 2.0
38 – 39 26 1.8   83 – 84 56 2.0
40 27 1.8   85 57 2.0
41 – 42 28 1.8   86 – 87 58 2.0
43 29 1.8   88 59 2.0
44 – 45 30 1.8   89 – 90 60 2.0
46 31 2.0   91  61  2.0
47 – 48  32 2.0    92 – 93 62 2.0
49  33 2.0    94 63 2.0
 50 – 51 34 2.0    95 64 2.0
52  35 2.0    96+ No longer eligible - max time limit

 

The Federal Satisfactory Academic Progress policy requires students maintain a minimum completion rate of 67%. This is measured by dividing total degree credits earned by total degree credits attempted.

For example, Student A has attempted 42 credits and earned 36. Student A's completion rate is calculated using the following formula: 36 / 42 = 85.7%. Student A is meeting the minimum requirement.

Student B has attempted 24 credits and earned 15. Student B's completion rate is calculated using the following formula: 15 / 24 = 62.5%. Student B is not meeting the minimum 67% completion rate.

The chart above outlines the number of credits a student must generally accrue based on the number of credits they have attempted. Please note, transfer credits accepted to a student's current degree program are counted as both attempted and earned.

*All withdrawals, after the add/drop (refund) period, including "unofficial withdrawals" (no longer attending class), will be counted as attempts. Students falling below the above standards will be ineligible for financial assistance unless they are approved for a waiver due to unusual circumstances.

In addition to meeting the requirements for Title IV satisfactory academic progress, students must also meet the following standards of satisfactory academic progress for state aid programs (TAP, APTS and EOP).

Requirements for State Academic Progress and Pursuit

See Requirements for TAP

When you apply for federal financial aid, your answers to certain questions will determine whether you're considered dependent on your parents or independent. If you are considered to be dependent on your parents, according to federal guidelines, you must report their income and assets as well as your own. If you are independent, you must report only your own income and assets (and those of your spouse, if you are married).

You are an independent student for federal financial aid purposes for the 2019-2020 aid year if at least "one" of the following applies to you:
  • Student was born before January 1, 1996.
  • Student is married or separated (but not divorced) as of the date of the application.
  • At the beginning of the 2019-2020 school year, the student will be enrolled in a master's or doctoral degree program (such as an MA, MBA, MD, JD, PhD, EdD, or graduate certificate, etc.).
  • Student is currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces, or is a National Guard or Reserves enlistee called into federal active duty for other than training purposes.
  • Student is a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces.
  • Student has one or more children who receive more than half their support from him or her between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020.
  • Student has dependent(s) (other than children or spouse) who live with him or her and who receive more than half of their support from the student, now and through June 30, 2020.
  • At any time since the student turned age 13, both of the student's parent were deceased, the student was in foster care, or the student was a dependent/ward of the court.
  • As determined by a court in the student's state of legal residence, the student is now or was upon reaching the age of majority, an emancipated minor (released from control by his or her parent or guardian).
  • As determined by a court in the student's state of legal residence, the student is now or was upon reaching the age of majority, in legal guardianship.
  • Student was determined by a high school or school district homeless liaison to be an unaccompanied youth who was homeless.
  • Student was determined by the director of an emergency shelter or transitional housing program funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to be an unaccompanied youth who was homeless.
  • Student was determined by the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program to be an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or was self-supporting and at risk of being homeless.
  • Student was determined by the college financial aid administrator to be an unaccompanied youth who is homeless or is self-supporting and at risk of being homeless.

The Financial Aid Office may consider an unusual circumstance for students not meeting one of the above criteria. If you feel you have an unusual circumstance, download and print the Request for Dependency Override form and visit your campus Financial Aid Office. Please be prepared to submit proof of independence to your Financial Aid Office if requested.

Federal Government Grants

Need Help Paying for College?

There are many sources of aid available to students attending Suffolk. Federal Title IV Financial Aid includes; Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), Federal Work Student and William D. Ford Direct Loans. Financial Aid can also include scholarships and other employment opportunities. State aid includes Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) and Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS).

Also, do not forget about the various federal and state tax deductions and saving incentives available for attending college; and the benefits available if you are a veteran.

For more information see below:

Pell Grant
  • Range from $639 to $6,345 for the 2020-2021 academic year
  • Must demonstrate financial need
  • Amount of grant based on income, assets, family size, family members in college and enrollment status
  • Available to students taking at least three credits in degree or certificate program
  • For summer study awards are determined on remaining eligibility from the previous fall and spring term
  • There is a lifetime limit of 12 semesters of Pell Grant eligibility
  • Disbursements for Books and Supplies: Students who receive a Pell Grant in excess of tuition and fees may utilize a school credit in the campus bookstore. If a student does not utilize the school credit a refund will be sent directly to the student. A student can opt out of this credit by notifying the campus Financial Aid Office in writing. 
Excelsior Scholarship

New York State tuition free degree program, the Excelsior Scholarship is intended to supplement all current aid programs, including but not limited to TAP, PELL and other scholarships. Students can receive up to $5,500 from the scholarship, minus any amounts received from TAP, PELL, or other scholarships. It will provide assistance to students to cover any tuition gaps and make college tuition free. The scholarship makes college possible for students across the state and helps to alleviate the crushing burden of student debt. Students apply through New York State and applications will be available in late May. For additional information, visit the HESC website.

Applicants must:

  • Be resident of New York State;
  • Plan to attend a SUNY or CUNY two- or four-year degree program;
  • Take 30 credits per year and make progress toward graduation;
  • Maintain good academic standing;
  • Be on track to graduate on time with an Associate Degree in two years or a Bachelor’s Degree in four years; and
  • Be a New York State resident whose family household adjusted gross income (as filed on your 2017 federal tax return) does not exceed $125,000 for the 2018-19 and 2019-20 academic year.
Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)
  • Annual awards range to $5,165 per year
  • Students must be taking at least 12 credits per semester, except students with disabilities who may receive a prorated award for less than 12 credits
  • Eligibility is determined by the family's New York State Net Taxable Income of the prior year (up to $80,000)
  • Part-time TAP is available to students with disabilities. You must be a New York State resident enrolled for 3-11 credits and meet the criteria for the American with Disabilities Act (ADA)
  • Part Time TAP is available to New York State residents enrolled for 6-11.5 credits who earned two consecutive semesters of 12 credits each. Part time TAP awards are pro-rated.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)
  • Awards range from $100 to $2,000 per academic year
  • Students must demonstrate exceptional financial need
  • Generally students must be taking at least six credits per semester
Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS)
  • Awards range from $100 to $1,000 per semester
  • Students must be enrolled for between 3-11 credits, and must take at least one 3-credit college level course
  • Eligibility is determined by the family's New York State Net Taxable Income for the prior year
Part-time Scholarship (PTS) Award Program

The New York State Part-time Scholarship award provides tuition awards to students attending SUNY or CUNY community colleges who are enrolled part-time each semester. Recipients of the PTS award will receive an award that covers the cost of six credit hours or $1,500 per term, whichever is less. An award recipient is entitled to award payments for not more than four consecutive academic semesters. Students apply through New York State. For additional information, visit the HESC website.

Applicants must:

  • Be resident of New York State;
  • Plan to attend a SUNY or CUNY college;
  • Be enrolled in at least six but less than 12 credits per term; and
  • Maintain cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher.
Federal Work Study
  • Hourly wage ranges from $13.00 to $13.50 per hour
  • Provides part-time employment during the academic year
  • Jobs may be on campus or at off-campus locations that provide public service to our community
  • Students may tutor in elementary schools through the American Reads Program
Part-Time Jobs on Campus
  • Some part-time jobs are available on campus through various academic departments
  • These jobs are not based on a student's financial need
  • Information on full-time, part-time, summer and seasonal employment is available at Career Services

Other Grants and Scholarships

Excelsior Scholarship

New York State tuition-free degree program, the Excelsior Scholarship is intended to supplement all current aid programs, including but not limited to TAP, PELL and other scholarships. Students can receive up to $5,500 from the scholarship, minus any amounts received from TAP, PELL, or other scholarships. It will provide assistance to students to cover any tuition gaps and make college tuition-free. The scholarship makes college possible for students across the state and helps to alleviate the crushing burden of student debt. Students apply through New York State and applications will be available in late May. For additional information, visit the HESC website.

Eligibility:

Applicants must:

  • Be resident of New York State;
  • Plan to attend a SUNY or CUNY two- or four-year degree program;
  • Take 30 credits per year and make progress toward graduation;
  • Maintain good academic standing;
  • Be on track to graduate on time with an Associate Degree in two years or a Bachelor’s Degree in four years; and
  • Be a New York State resident whose family household adjusted gross income (as filed on your 2017 federal tax return) does not exceed $125,000 for the 2018-19 and 2019-20 academic year.

To apply for this scholarship, you will need to:

  1. Upload a .pdf copy of your SAR (Student Aid Report) to the HESC website. If you do not have a copy of your SAR you can obtain one from fafsa.ed.gov.
  2. Upload a .pdf copy of your unofficial transcript. The transcript can be obtained by logging into MySCCC and selecting Unofficial Transcript in the Self-Service Banner menu.

For additional information visit the HESC website where you will find a list of questions and answers.

Part-Time Scholarship (PTS) Award Program

The New York State Part-Time Scholarship award provides tuition awards to students attending SUNY or CUNY community colleges who are enrolled part-time each semester.  Recipients of the PTS award will receive an award that covers the cost of six credit hours or $1,500 per term, whichever is less.  An award recipient is entitled to award payments for not more than four consecutive academic semesters.  Students apply through New York State.  For additional information, visit the HESC website.

Eligibility:

Applicants must:

  • Be resident of New York State;
  • Plan to attend a SUNY or CUNY college;
  • Be enrolled in at least six but less than 12 credits per term; and
  • Maintain cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher.
Regents Awards for Children of Deceased or Disabled Veterans, Police Officers and Firefighters

There are awards for children of disabled veterans of the war periods 1941-46, 1950-55, 1961-75, and 1990-end of hostilities. There are also awards for children of servicemen who were prisoners of war or missing in action from those periods. The award is $450 a year for up to four years of full-time college study in New York State. Child of Police Officer-Firefighters Awards are for children of police officers or firefighters who died as a result of an on the job injury after June 30, 1982. The award is $450 a year for up to four years of undergraduate study. The following award / scholarship programs are available from New York State: 

  1. Children of Veteran Awards - for students whose parent(s) served in the U.S. Armed Forces during specified period of war or national emergency.
  2. Veterans Tuition Awards - Vietnam, Persian Gulf, or Afghanistan veterans matriculated for full or part-time study.
  3. NYS Memorial Scholarships – for families of deceased Firefighters, Volunteer Firefighters, Police Officers, Peace Officers and Emergency Medical Service Workers who died as the result of injuries sustained in the line of duty in service to the State of New York.
  4. World Trade Center Memorial Scholarships – for families and financial dependents of victims who died or were severely and permanently disabled as a result of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.
  5. Volunteer Recruitment Service Scholarships – for fire and ambulance volunteers.

Students should contact New York State Higher Education Corporation at 888-697-4372 for additional information on all programs above.

Educational Incentive Program

This is a program designed for students who are current employees at a registered or licensed day care provider. Students must be pursuing courses or programs related to early childhood education, child day care, children with special needs and other related subjects. Scholarship awards are based on income, type of courses studied and other priority considerations. Awards range from $117 per credit to $1,335 for full time study per semester. For additional information you must call (800) 295-9616.

Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program

Based on SAT or ACT scores and grade point average. Maximum award of $1,500 based on Federal Application. Applications available at high school Guidance Office or from the Bureau of HEOP/VTEA Scholarships, NYS Education Department, Education Building Annex, Room 1071, Albany, NY 12234, (518) 486-1319.

NYS Scholarship for Academic Excellence

NYS residents who are US citizens or eligible non-citizens enrolled (matriculated) for 12 credits or more. Cannot be in default on any NYS guaranteed student loan. Must attend a college in NYS. Awards are $1,500 to the top graduating senior of each high school in NYS, $500 to other academically gifted students for up to 4 years, or 5 years in certain programs. Scholarship must be used within 7 years. Contact the high school guidance office. To receive payment, complete the TAP application process.

Native American Education Student Aid

The Native American Education Student Aid is financial assistance for eligible Native American students for study in approved, undergraduate programs at New York State Institutions of higher education. It is not available for study at institutions located outside of New York State. Receiving New York State TAP does not affect a student's eligibility to receive Native American Education Student Aid.

For further information and to obtain the application to apply contact:
New York State Higher Education Services
Phone: (518) 474-0537
Fax:      (518) 474-3666

Educational Opportunity Grant (EOP)

A special program for New York State students who have been designated by the college as both academically and economically disadvantaged. For more information on this program please contact the EOP Office.

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR, formerly VESID)

This program offers access to a full range of employment and independent living services that may be needed by persons with disabilities through their lives through its administration of vocational rehabilitation and independent living programs. For more information visit ACCES-VR.

Contact the District Office located at:

Hauppauge, New York
Phone: (631) 952-6357

Riverhead, New York
Phone: (631) 727-6496

Benefits Under the G.I. Bill and the War Orphans Assistance Program

General information is available on the college homepage. Specific information is available by contacting the Veterans Administration toll-free at (888) 442-2551 or the Veteran Service Agency located in Hauppauge at (631) 853-8387.

Benefits Available by Being a Student and Part-Time Soldier

For educational purposes only, up to a maximum of $9,768 can be received by serving in the Army Reserves. New York Army National Guard pays 100% of tuition charges. Contact your local State Armory and / or U.S. Army Reserve Unit. Loan repayment assistance is also available. Contact the Veterans Administration for additional information.

Application Process

When to Apply

The federal financial aid application (FAFSA) is available on October 1st each year. For example, students enrolling for the 2020-21 award year may complete the FAFSA on October 1, 2019. Applicants will use 2018 tax information for that application. New York State residents may apply for most forms of New York State aid beginning October 1st.

To meet our priority deadline and to be considered for maximum financial aid, students should complete the filing process by April 15th for students enrolling in the Fall term and November 1st for the new Spring students. Financial aid is not automatically renewed, and must be applied for each academic year. In order to continue to receive federal and state financial aid, students must be in good academic standing and maintain satisfactory academic progress. The satisfactory progress standards for financial aid recipients are on the website under the “Eligibility Requirements” menu.

Potential students may apply for financial aid prior to admission, although financial aid awards are only offered to admitted students.

The federal government requires that the FAFSA application be processed by your last day of enrollment.

Federal Grants (PELL, SEOG) and Loans

Attention Tax Filers: We urge you to utilize the IRS Data Retrieval Tool when filing your FAFSA. For instructions read #3 below and select verification.

  1. After filing the FAFSA, you will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR) from the government via email. The SAR will be mailed to you in the event you do not have a valid email address (i.e., in one week for electronic filing; four to six weeks for paper filing).
  2. If your SAR is incorrect or additional information is needed, go to fafsa.ed.gov to make corrections. Once you sign into fafsa.ed.gov, you can select "Make FAFSA Corrections."
  3. If selected by the Department of Education for verification you must submit appropriate income tax transcripts from the IRS and download the appropriate . The Department of Education selects students and you may be required to verify such items as income, family size, high school graduation or equivalent, and identity.
  4. Access your financial aid on the student portal at sunysuffolk.edu. Students offered federal work-study or a federal Direct Student loan must accept or decline on the student portal, sunysuffolk.edu. Select "MySCCC" and then choose Financial Aid. There you will find your financial aid status. Select "Accept Award Offer."
  5. If your award offer does not include a student loan and you wish to borrow funds for your education, complete the Student Loan Request and Adjustment Form and submit to your campus financial aid office.
  6. First time borrowers must complete an entrance interview at studentaid.gov.
  7. If you were awarded a loan you must sign an electronic Master Promissory Note (e-MPN) at studentaid.gov.
  8. You must sign the e-MPN before the Department of Education can release your funds. You will need to sign the e-MPN using your FSA ID and password.
  9. The Department of Education will send you a loan disclosure notice which will include your loan approval and or denial, the amount of your loans(s), and they type of loan borrowed.
  10. Loans will not be deducted from your tuition bill until the above steps are taken. It is recommended that you complete these steps before June 30th for the fall semester and December 10th for the spring semester.
  11. Financial aid may be reduced or cancelled if a student drops or withdraws from any course(s).
State Grants (TAP)

The New York State TAP program is for full time students (12+ credits per semester).

  1. After filing the FAFSA, on the confirmation page, you will see a link to NYS Higher Education TAP Application. This application allows you to file for the New York State Tuition Assistance Program.
  2. If you miss the link from the online FAFSA you may apply at tapweb.org. The Suffolk CCC school code is 2157.
  3. You will be able to check your TAP status on the HESC website.
  4. Your TAP funds will be disbursed to your college tuition account upon receipt.
State Grants (Excelsior Scholarship)

The New York State Excelsior Scholarship is for full time students (12+ college level credits per semester).  An exception is made for students with qualified disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities who attend less than full time and are registered with the College Disability Services office.

  1. Complete the FAFSA application as described above.
  2. Complete the NYS Higher Education TAP Application as described above.
  3. Complete the NYS Excelsior Application with Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC).  Refer to the 'How to Apply' section of HESC's Excelsior Scholarship page for additional information.
  4. When you apply, you will need to upload a .pdf copy of your Student Aid Report (SAR) and your unofficial transcript to the HESC website.  If you do not have a copy of your SAR, you can obtain one from fafsa.ed.gov.  Your unofficial transcript can be obtained by logging into MySCCC and selecting Unofficial Transcript in the Self-Service Banner menu.
  5. Your Excelsior funds will be disbursed to your college tuition account upon receipt.
State Grants (APTS)

The APTS program is available to part time students (3-11 credits), which must include at least one 3-credit college-level course.

  1. After filing the FAFSA, download the Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS) application or obtain an application at your campus Financial Aid Office.
  2. Complete the APTS application and submit it to your campus Financial Aid Office along with a signed copy of your NY State Tax Return. If you are a dependent, please also submit a signed copy of your parent's NYS tax return.
  3. Your campus Financial Aid Office will notify you about your eligibility.
  4. APTS awards will be disbursed to your college account upon receipt.
  5. Note that your APTS award may be reduced for each course from which you withdraw.
State Grants (PTS)

The New York State Part-time Scholarship is available to students who are enrolled for at least 6 but less than 12 credits. 

  1. Complete the FAFSA application as described above.
  2. Complete the NYS Part-time Scholarship Application with Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC).  Refer to the 'How to Apply' section of HESC's Part-time Scholarship page for additional information.
  3. PTS awards will be disbursed to your college account upon receipt.

Loans

Need Help Paying for College?

There are many sources of aid available to students attending Suffolk. Federal Title IV Financial Aid includes; Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), Federal Work Student and William D. Ford Direct Loans. Financial Aid can also include scholarships and other employment opportunities. State aid includes Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) and Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS).

Also, do not forget about the various federal and state tax deductions and saving incentives available for attending college; and the benefits available if you are a veteran.

For more information see below:

William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

The Federal Direct Loan Programs (subsidized/unsubsidized) enable students (or parents) to borrow funds from the federal government to help with educational costs. Under the subsidized loan program, the federal government pays the interest while the student is enrolled and during their grace period. Unsubsidized loans are available regardless of financial need. Interest begins to accrue on the day the loan is disbursed, and the student is responsible for interest accrued during in school and grace periods. Interest payments can be paid monthly, quarterly, or be capitalized by the lender and added to the loan principal.

Students may apply for a loan if they are enrolled in at least a half-time status (6 credits or more) in their program of study.

  • Dependent freshman may borrow up to a maximum of $5,500 per year, the maximum increases to $6,500 for sophomores (must have completed at least 32 credits at SCCC). The maximum subsidized loan amounts are $3,500 and $4,500 respectively, additional funds would be unsubsidized.
  • Independent freshman may borrow up to a maximum of $9,500 per year, the maximum increases to $10,500 for sophomores (must have completed at least 32 credits at SCCC). The maximum subsidized loan amounts are $3,500 and $4,500 respectively, additional funds would be unsubsidized.
  • Loans proceeds are disbursed in two installments, generally one in the Fall term and one in the Spring term.
  • Loan repayment begins six months after a borrower graduates, withdraws or ceases attending less than half time.
  • For more information regarding loan repayment and an estimate of your estimated monthly payments, visit studentaid.gov.
  • Students who are not automatically offered a student loan may still request one by completing the Student Loan Request/Adjustment from on our website and submitting to their campus financial aid office for eligibility determination
  • First time borrowers must complete an entrance interview and a Master Promissory Note at studentaid.gov.
  • The Department of Education will send borrowers a loan disclosure notice which indicates your loan approval and/or denial as well as the type and amounts of your loans.
Federal Parent Loan (PLUS)
  • Parents of a dependent student enrolled at least half-time can borrow the cost of the student’s education less any financial aid awarded
  • Interest accrues when the loan is received
  • Repayment begins within 60 days of the loan disbursement
  • Parents and student must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine what other types of federal aid may be available
  • After student has received the results of the FAFSA, student must file the PLUS Loan Request
Exit Interview

Upon completing your studies or ceasing half-time enrollment, you must complete an exit interview. This may be done at studentaid.gov or in person at your campus financial aid office. The exit interview covers:

  • average anticipated monthly repayment amounts
  • repayment plan options
  • options to prepay or pay on shorter schedule
  • the seriousness and importance of the student’s repayment obligation
  • terms and conditions for forgiveness or cancellation
  • rights and responsibilities of students under Title IV, HEA loan programs
  • terms and conditions for deferment or forbearance
  • consequences of default
  • options and consequences of loan consolidation
  • tax benefits available to borrowers

If you encounter a problem in loan collection or other matters, please be aware that the U.S. Department of Education has established the FSA Ombudsman for student loan borrowers. This office may be contacted at:

U.S. Department of Education
FSA Ombudsman
830 First Street, N.E.
Fourth Floor
Washington, DC 20202-5144
Phone: (877) 557-2575
Fax: (202) 275-0549

American Opportunity Tax Credit (AOTC)

Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), more parents and students will qualify for the American Opportunity Tax Credit to help pay for college expenses.

The American Opportunity Tax Credit is a modification of the existing Hope Credit. The AOTC makes credit available to a broader range of taxpayers, including many with higher incomes and those who owe no tax. It also adds required course materials to the list of qualifying expenses and allows the credit to be claimed for four post-secondary education years instead of two. Many of those eligible will qualify for the maximum annual credit of $2,500 per student.

The full credit is available to individuals, whose modified adjusted gross income is $80,000 or less, or $160,000 or less for married couples filing a joint return. The credit is phased out for taxpayers with incomes above these levels. Unlike the other education tax credits, the AOTC includes expenses for course-related books, supplies and equipment that are not necessarily paid to the educational institution. It also differs from the Hope scholarship credit because it allows the credit to be claimed for four years of post-secondary education instead of two.

It is a tax credit of up to $2,500 of the cost of tuition, fees and course materials paid during the taxable year. Also, 40% of the credit (up to $1,000) is refundable. This means you can get it even if you owe no tax. For the AOTC, qualified expenses have been expanded to include expenditures for course materials, as well as tuition and required fees. For this purpose, the term "course materials" means books, supplies and equipment needed for a course of study whether or not the materials are purchased from the educational institution as a condition of enrollment or attendance. The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 extended the AOTC for five years through December 2017. If you still have questions about the American Opportunity Tax Credit, these questions and answers might help.

Lifetime Learning Credit

The lifetime learning credit helps parents and students pay for post-secondary education.

For the tax year, you may be able to claim a lifetime learning credit of up to $2,000 for qualified education expenses paid for all students enrolled in eligible educational institutions. There is no limit on the number of years the lifetime learning credit can be claimed for each student. However, a taxpayer cannot claim both the American Opportunity Credit and Lifetime Learning Credits for the same student in one year. Thus, the Lifetime Learning Credit may be particularly helpful to graduate students, students who are only taking one course and those who are not pursuing a degree.

Generally, you can claim the lifetime learning credit if all three of the following requirements are met:

  1. You pay qualified education expenses of higher education.
  2. You pay the education expenses for an eligible student.
  3. The eligible student is yourself, your spouse or a dependent for which you claim an exemption on your tax return.

If you pay qualified education expenses for more than one student in the same year, you can choose to take credits on a per-student, per-year basis. This means that, for example, you can claim the American Opportunity Credit for one student and the Lifetime Learning Credit for another student in the same year.

529 Plan (New York Saves)

New York, like most states offers a 529 Plan which is designed to assist people in saving for college costs. The plan allows you to contribute funds to an account for a beneficiary for educational related expenses, including tuition and fees and certain room and board cost. The funds are managed by Vanguard, and the account owner can choose from a range of investment options.

There are numerous tax benefits available to plan participants. The earnings grow federally tax deferred. Qualified withdrawals are federally tax-free. New York State taxpayers may be eligible to deduct up to $5,000 in annual contributions ($10,000 for married filers) on their New Your State tax return. Additional information is available on their website at www.nysaves.org.

Suffolk County Community College Foundation Scholarships

Suffolk County Community College Foundation Scholarships

Scholarships for the 2020-21 Academic Year Open Sept. 1

The scholarship program at Suffolk County Community College is administered under the auspices of the Suffolk Community College Foundation, Inc. Scholarships are made available through the generosity of various individuals, student organizations, college faculty and staff, local and community groups, business firms, and through the fund-raising activities of the Suffolk Community College Foundation.

Eligibility criteria vary depending on the particular scholarship in question. Typical criteria include grade point average and credits completed, while selected scholarships may also require a specific academic program, residence in a limited geographic area, community service, or co-curricular activities. Other factors which may be considered include essays, faculty recommendations, and interviews. The actual selection process is coordinated by both campus and collegewide scholarship committees.

We urge you to carefully review all of the scholarship listings and to actively pursue all those for which you are qualified. Good luck!

Online Scholarship System - Quick Tips 

Getting Started

  • You can view scholarship information on our website
  • If you would like to apply for any scholarships, you must have your SCCC login and password available
  • Sign into the Online Scholarship System
  • Select the Sign In With Your Institution box

General Application

  • One you log in, you will see your General Application
  • Choose whether you are a New Student or Continuing Student

Conditional Application

  • Contains information to be used for all scholarships you choose to apply for within Online Scholarship System
  • You must supply the requested information on the application
  • Select the Applicant Record tab on the left side of the screen. This contains data imported from Banner and cannot be updated.
  • If you need to update your personal information in Banner, please fill out a Records Change Form with your campus Registrar's office.

Opportunities Page

  • All available scholarships at the College are listed on the Opportunities Page.
  • Scholarship opportunities listed on the Recommended tab are scholarships matched to your applicant record information.

Important

  • Please read through each scholarship opportunity to determine which one(s) you decide to apply for.
  • You may apply for all scholarships for which you meet qualifications.

Applying for Scholarships

  • Select the scholarship opportunity.
  • Complete the Supplemental Questions (if applicable).
  • Submit your application.

Q: Applying for a scholarship that requires a letter of recommendation?
A: Please contact your reference before you supply his/her email address.

Q. Will I be notified if I win a scholarship or award?
A. You will receive an email notification through your college email account. Be sure to check your college email frequently. You can track the status of the scholarship to which you applied in the Online Scholarship System?

Contact Us

Have general questions regarding the SCCC Scholarship Program? Please email scholarships@sunysuffolk.edu or call (631) 451-4026.

If you would like to become a donor, please email the SCC Foundation at foundation@sunysuffolk.edu or call (631) 451-4846.

Get There From Here Scholarship Program

Get There From Here Scholarship Program

In 2008, the Suffolk Community College Foundation received the largest gift in its history. Given by an anonymous donor, the scholarship contribution was expressly directed toward supporting women and members of Suffolk County's diverse populations in order to help them achieve their highest academic, personal, and professional potential through the benefit of higher education. Thanks to additional contributions from community-based organizations and funding from the County, the Foundation is able to extend the opportunity to apply for this scholarship to all residents of Suffolk County.

As a result, a select number of Suffolk County residents who meet the scholarship's eligibility requirements and complete the application process, will receive scholarships that enable them to benefit from the College mission:

"To promote intellectual discovery, physical development, social and ethical awareness, and economic opportunities for all through an education that transforms lives, builds communities and improves society."

For the 2020 funding cycle, approximately 15 scholarships will be awarded to students enrolled for the Fall 2020 semester. The maximum annual award may be as much as $6,500. Get There From Here Scholarship funds will be allocated toward tuition and fees first. Any remaining funds will be allocated toward textbooks and supplies. Textbook and supply allocations are administered as a bookstore credit. Any unspent funds remaining at the end of each semester will be returned to the Foundation.

Scholarship award amounts can fluctuate from year to year based upon a number of factors, including student enrollment status, total amount of the student's financial aid package and other scholarships received. Once selected as a Get There From Here Scholar, the amount of the Get There From Here Scholarship will be recalculated each semester.

Get There From Here Brochure

Stay On Long Island Initiative (SoLII)

Full Tuition Scholarships for SCCC Graduating Students

The Stay on Long Island Initiative (SoLII) is a program created by Dr. Shaun L. McKay, President of Suffolk County Community College. It seeks to ensure that Long Island's brightest and most talented students consider the merits of continuing their education at a Long Island-based college or university.

Scholarships

As a result of this initiative, SCCC is working in partnership with a select group of four-year educational institutions on Long Island. This past academic year more than $1,000,000 in merit scholarships were awarded to SCCC's graduates. Many of these awards were for full-tuition scholarships. Other students were offered significant SoLII Merit Awards. Some of the partial awards were as large as $20,000. Awards are renewable if grades are maintained.

The Stay on Long Island Initiative (SoLII) provides full- and partial-tuition scholarships to Suffolk County Community College's top graduates. This scholarship ensures that high achieving students from Suffolk can pursue their educational dreams locally, through scholarships offered by 13 of Long Island's quality four-year colleges and universities.

If you have questions about SoLII, please call (631) 851-6847 or email us.

See the SoLII Brochure for more information.

New York State Presidential Scholarship

What began as a way to ensure that Suffolk's most talented graduating students would remain on Long Island to complete their educations at a partnering college or university, is now a network of 22 institutions across New York State.  Through this program, we are successfully keeping top students in New York State whose talents can transform the region by awarding students full-tuition scholarships to partner four-year colleges in New York State.

The NYSPT Scholarship Brochure provides additional information.

NSF-STEM Scholarship Program

NSF-STEM Scholarship Program

Purpose

The NSF STEM Scholarship Program at Suffolk County Community College provides a unique, educational enrichment environment for students pursuing careers in science (biology, chemistry, physics, earth and space, geology, information technology) technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

Those students accepted into the program will be provided with academic support services to enhance their college experience and increase their likelihood of success.

SCCC proposes to fund at least 30 NSF-STEM scholars annually at an average of $4,250 each.

Target Population

NSF STEM scholarships serve those students in the targeted majors who:

  • Are enrolled in a degree program in one of the following disciplines:
    • Biological sciences (except medicine and other clinical fields)
    • Physical sciences, including chemistry, physics, astronomy, geology, and material sciences
    • Mathematical sciences
    • Computer and information sciences
    • Geosciences
    • Engineering
    • Technology areas associated with the preceding fields (for example, biotechnology, chemical technology, engineering technology, information technology, etc.)
  • Are enrolled full-time for each semester of scholarship receipt
  • Demonstrate academic talent and potential (GPA of 2.7 or above)
  • Demonstrate financial need, defined by US Dept. of Education for need-based Federal financial aid (FAFSA)
  • Are citizens of the United States, nationals, permanent residents, or refugees
Services
  • Tutoring and advising
  • Field trips and seminars
  • Job shadowing and internships
  • Transition programs for graduates continuing their education at four-year institutions
  • Monthly meetings
  • Mentoring of STEM participants and
  • Collaborations with Brookhaven National Laboratory and Stony Brook University

Empire State Diversity Program Honors Scholarship

Empire State Diversity Program Honors Scholarship

The Empire State Diversity Honors Scholarship (ESDHS) Program is a scholarship of direct aid to attract and retain undergraduate students to State University of New York campuses who have demonstrated high academic achievement and can demonstrate that they will contribute to the diversity of the student body. The program is for students from a broad range of backgrounds who will contribute to the diversity of the student body in their chosen program or school.

Learn More

Senior Citizens

Suffolk County residents 60 years of age or older are invited to attend credit-bearing courses on a space-available basis without paying tuition. Please note, however, that senior citizens are expected to pay required college fees. In addition, senior citizens enrolling in a physical education, internship, cooperative education or field placement course/program are required to pay a non-refundable accident insurance fee.

Those who attend courses through this program do not receive academic credit but have an opportunity to develop their personal and professional interests by attending the classes as “audit” students. Though not paying tuition, senior citizens are subject to the audit conditions outlined under "Grading System" of the Academic Policies webpage. It should be understood that no grades can be earned or recorded for participation in these courses.

Unfortunately, the College cannot extend this opportunity to attend courses on a space-available basis to senior citizens registering for Continuing Education/non-credit courses, since the latter must be financially self-supporting and therefore, tuition must be paid.

Each semester a special registration time is set aside for senior citizens who wish to avail themselves of this program. Additional information may be obtained by calling the Campus Registrar’s Office.

Senior citizens are also invited to attend the theatre productions, concerts, art exhibits and lectures sponsored by the College.

Student Affairs

Introduction and Services

College Mission Statement

Suffolk County Community College promotes intellectual discovery, physical development, social and ethical awareness, and economic opportunities for all through an education that transforms lives, builds communities, and improves society.

Division Mission Statement

The Division of Student Affairs promotes learning through quality programs and services that empower individuals to realize their educational goals in accordance with the mission of the college.

Division Vision Statement

The Division of Student Affairs is committed to a shared responsibility for transformative student learning that fully supports students in their pursuit of their educational and career goals. The philosophical approach is grounded in the seminal text, Learning Reconsidered 2, a student affairs, peer reviewed document adapted internationally as the standard for the profession. Student learning occurs as they connect social, academic and through institutional contexts. Through intentional education, students are exposed to cognitive thinking, global awareness, interpersonal communication and intrapersonal well-being. The Division of Student Affairs views all student interactions as an opportunity for growth and development by encouraging and creating opportunities to partner with students as they navigate their educational goals.

Division Assessment Plan

In alignment with the Division Mission and Vision statement, each unit within the Division of Student Affairs has developed area specific goals with outcomes which are measured using annual assessment plans. The Division of Student Affairs also conducts unit reviews on a seven year cycle to holistically review the goals, outcomes and assessments. All assessments and unit reviews align to the Comprehensive Assessment Plan for Institutional Effectiveness (CAPIE) and are included as part of the Administrative Educational Support (AES) units

Counseling and Advising

Counseling Centers

The Counseling Centers at Suffolk County Community College assist all students in defining and accomplishing personal, academic, and career goals. The staff is guided by a belief in the dignity, worth, and uniqueness of each individual. By providing a confidential atmosphere conducive to openness, self-exploration, and change, counselors work with students to foster growth, independence, and self-esteem. All of our efforts are ultimately to assist students in realizing their fullest potential.
 
Specific counseling services for students include:

  • Academic and Educational Counseling
  • Career Counseling
  • Transfer Counseling
  • Personal Growth Workshops
  • Personal Counseling
  • Mental Health Counseling

Career Services

About Career Services

The Career Services office supports the mission, academic programs, and the advancement of Suffolk County Community College. The office of Career Services assists students and alumni in understanding the career development process. It offers opportunities for students to enhance their educational and career goals through experiential learning and relevant work experience. In addition, students are provided with assistance in developing effective job search skills, for the ultimate purpose of pursuing meaningful careers.

Programs/Services Offered

  • Career Counseling
  • Career Assessments
  • Career/Job/Internship Fairs
  • Career Workshops
  • Internships/Cooperative Education
  • Interviewing Preparation
  • Job Search/Employment Opportunities
  • Résumé/Cover Letter Assistance
  • Suffolk's College Central
    • This free, web-based tool is designed to help students, alumni, and community residents connect with employers looking to fill a wide range of employment opportunities.

Mental Health Services

College is a very exciting time that also presents many challenges and transitions for students. For students who may be experiencing psychological, emotional, social and/or behavioral issues or who simply need additional support, we offer short term individual counseling and group counseling on campus by licensed mental health professionals. For students who may need psychiatric or other specialized services, counselors will help coordinate referral to appropriate resources. Generally, students are scheduled for an appointment within a few days and can be seen the same day if necessary. Students can call, email or stop by the Counseling Center on their campus to schedule an appointment or to get information about group and other resources.

In addition to counseling support, students are also seen for crisis intervention services. If a student is experiencing a psychological emergency that is life threatening or involves imminent danger (risk of harm to self or others), contact the Department of Public Safety at (631) 451-4242 and/or 9-1-1 for immediate assistance.

For wellness resources and upcoming events, please visit our SCCC CARES: Promoting Mindfulness and Well-being Guide.

Julia Kiely, PhD
Interim College Director of Mental Health Services
Ammerman Campus
Ammerman Building, Room 209
(631) 451-4069 or (631) 451-4053
kielyj@sunysuffolk.edu

Eastern Campus (Riverhead)

Maggie Marcincuk, MA, LCSW
Peconic Building, Room 212E
(631) 548-2650
marcinm@sunysuffolk.edu

Ammerman Campus (Selden)

Sarah Boles, LCSW
Ammerman Building, Room 209
(631) 451-4530 or (631) 451-4053
boless@sunysuffolk.edu

Evan Haun, LMHC, ATR-BC
Ammerman Building, Room 209
(631) 451-4060 or (631) 451-4053
haune@sunysuffolk.edu

Michael J. Grant Campus (Brentwood)

Hypatia Martinez, LCSW
Caumsett Hall, Lower Level
(631) 851-6872
martinhy@sunysuffolk.edu

Suffolk is also partnered with the North Shore LIJ's Behavioral Health College Partnership (BHCP) program, which works closely with the college to address behavioral health issues impacting students. BHCP collaborates to provide state-of-the-art evaluation and evidence-based treatment for psychiatric crises and aftermath, as well as diverse challenges ranging from adjustment problems to major disorders emerging during the transition to college life.

To find out more information on this program, visit BHCP Website.

RESPONSE Hotline
24-Hour Crisis Counseling
(631) 751-7500

DASH Care Center
24-Hour Crisis Community-Based Site
90 Adams Avenue, Hauppauge, NY 11788
(631) 952-3333

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
1-800-273-TALK (8255) or
Text: START to 741-741

The JED Foundation
Emotional health and suicide prevention for teens and young adults

Victims Information Bureau Services - Suffolk (VIBS)
24-Hour Dating/Domestic Violence & Rape/Sexual Assault Hotline
(631) 360-3606

The Retreat (East End)
Dating/Domestic Abuse Hotline
(631) 329-2200

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration

2-1-1 Long Island
Database for local health and human services agencies and programs

SCCC CARES is a college-wide initiative geared toward Creating Awareness and Readiness to End Stigma related to mental health issues in our campus communities. We are focused on educating our campus communities about brain health and wellness and the resources available on and off campus for support and treatment.  Outreach programming, workshops and other opportunities that promote wellness are available on each campus as part of this initiative.  You can also inquire on your individual campus about an SCCC CARES Club.

Transfer Counseling

An up-to-date database of catalogs for four-year colleges, two-year colleges and vocational schools is available in the reference area of each campus library and on the library webpage. Further transfer assistance and related materials, including information about transfer scholarships at many of Long Island’s private and public colleges, may be obtained from the Career and Transfer Center at each campus. 

Every semester, Transfer Days are held on each campus so that students can meet with representatives from dozens of four-year colleges and universities in order to obtain information about admission requirements and program offerings. Further information about these programs can be obtained from any campus admissions office, campus counseling center, or Central Admissions Office.

Assistance in evaluating educational options and identifying transfer institutions include:

  • "Position Your Transition" visits to Long Island colleges
  • Advice concerning the admissions process
  • On-site transfer advising with specific colleges on a certain day
  • Opportunities to meet with college representatives throughout the year
  • College Transfer Day

Disability Services

Philosophy, Goals and Accessibility

Disability Services Mission

The Office of Disability Services supports the mission, academic programs and the advancement of Suffolk County Community College by ensuring that qualified individuals with disabilities are afforded an equal opportunity to participate in the programs, services and activities at SCCC through the identification and enactment of reasonable accommodations to institutional policies and procedures, the provision of effective auxiliary aides and services and other support services while cultivating a campus culture that is sensitive and responsive to the needs of students.

Goals and Objectives

The goal of Suffolk County Community College with regard to students with disabilities is to equalize educational opportunities by minimizing physical, psychological and learning barriers. We attempt to provide as typical a college experience as is possible, encouraging students to achieve academically through the provision of special services, auxiliary aids, or reasonable program modifications. The main objectives are to:

  • insure that students with disabilities have equal access to all programs and services of the institution;
  • promote independence and preparation for entry into a competitive society;
  • facilitate the development of self-advocacy skills; and
  • assist students to transfer skills learned in the classroom to the world at large.

Accessibility

All major buildings on the three campuses are physically accessible. It should be noted that the Ammerman Campus is hilly, and as a result, wheelchair attendants may be needed during the winter months. Automatic doors have been installed in all major campus buildings. Adequate handicapped parking is available on all three campuses.
 

Voter Registration Information

National Voter Registration Act (NVRA)

Suffolk County Community College encourages all students to vote in local, state and national elections.

Suffolk County Community College’s Disability Services Offices are approved as National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) voter registration sites.

The National Voter Registration Act allows individuals to register to vote at numerous New York State agencies. This component of the National Voter Registration Act is called the "Agency-Based Voter Registration Program", and it provides registration opportunities when applying for services or assistance at state agencies.

The College’s Disability Services Offices have voter registration forms available. Information may be obtained by calling, 1 800 FOR-VOTE (1 (800) 367-8673) or, by filling out the on-line voter application request form;
National Voter Registration Act.

How to Obtain Disability Services

Students who need accommodations must submit written documentation of their disability to their home campus’ Office of Disability Services as soon as they are accepted to the College. This will allow the College sufficient time to make arrangements for accommodations and services before students take placement tests and before the start of classes.

The paperwork submitted must include supporting documentation from a physician, appropriate health care provider, or school- on appropriate letterhead and including the signature of the provider. Where appropriate, proof can also be provided by a rehabilitation agency such as Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR). Please note that proof from a school district must include the most recent psychoeducational report and the most current Individualized Education Program (IEP) or 504 Plan.

All documentation should include the following information:

  • Name or type of disability (i.e., diagnosis)
  • The limitations caused by the disability
  • The barriers or problems the student may have in a college setting
  • Recommendations of the services or accommodations the student will need while in college

The College generally requires all written proof of a disability be current. However, the College will accept test results and other documentation if the disability is not likely to substantially change over time. Students required to submit additional documentation may receive accommodations on a temporary basis if they can show that services were provided in the past. Accommodations will be considered on a case by case basis, however accommodations may be denied if no previous history exists or if the documentation does not support the request.

Office of Campus Activities and Student Leadership Development

Two Students at Ammerman

Philosophy and Mission

The Office of Campus Activities and Student Leadership Development complements the mission of the college by creating opportunities for student involvement and fostering campus environments that inspire students to become active members of the campus, the college and the community.

Working in collaboration with faculty and staff, the Office of Campus Activities offers a wide array of educational, cultural, leadership, social and recreational programs that promote student learning and development.

Staff efforts are intentionally focused upon enhancing student learning and personal development. Specifically, we assist students to:

  • develop life skills
  • foster critical thinking skills
  • develop a pluralistic perspective  
  • proactively embrace inclusion 
  • form and express conclusions
  • learn and practice leadership skills
  • explore personal values
  • become good citizens
 

Office of Campus Activities and Student Leadership Development staff serve as advocates for students, their environments, and the learning process. In order to promote student learning and success, we:

  • encourage the holistic development of all students
  • cultivate a sense of community among all students, faculty and staff at the campus and college
  • celebrate and affirm the diversity of our campus and college community
  • recognize diversity as a central tool for student learning and development
  • assist students in making an effective transition into the campus environment
  • seek innovative and creative solutions to issues and concerns
  • seek to work collaboratively with students and faculty
  • understand that our primary goal is to enhance student learning and student success

Ammerman Campus

Babylon Student Center
533 College Rd., Suite 100
Selden, NY 11784-2899
Main #: (631) 451-4376
Fax #: (631) 732-4330
To Make an Appointment,please email us.

Eastern Campus

Peconic Building Room 122
121 Speonk Riverhead Rd.
Riverhead, NY 11901-3499
Main #: (631) 548-2522
Fax #: (631) 548-3613
To Make an Appointment,please email us.

Grant Campus

Captree Commons #110
1001 Crooked Hill Rd.
Brentwood, NY 11717-1062
Main #: (631) 851-6702
Fax #: (631) 851-6302
To Make an Appointment,please email us.

Multicultural Affairs

Mission

Our mission is to enhance, accentuate, inspire and support the cultural and intellectual diversity at Suffolk County Community College. This is essential for a continual progression toward excellence.

We are committed to:

  • exploring ideas from our colleagues, from national resources including other colleges and institutions of learning, and from our local communities;
  • organizing this information and insight into useful initiatives, programs and community events;
  • maintaining an open-access resource file;
  • collaborating with academic departments/divisions to develop creative ways to further infuse diversity into the curriculum;
  • modifying our grounds and buildings to reflect the rich multicultural composition of our college and community; and
  • realizing our vision through our attitudes and practices.

Vision

We envision a college environment that recognizes and celebrates the vital richness and necessity of diversity; a curriculum that continues to progress toward broader cultural awareness and competence; and a community that demonstrates inherent sensitivity, appreciation and respect for individuals and groups of difference.

Goals

  • To foster an understanding and appreciation of diversity within the college community, and to provide opportunities for the community to understand and celebrate diversity.
  • To promote the cultural, personal, social, leadership, and intellectual development of all students.
  • To ensure the inclusion of underrepresented and/or underserved populations in the entitlements, benefits, and opportunities provided to the general student population.

Athletics

The Athletic Program is a vital component of the College’s co-curricular offerings. Suffolk County Community College is a member of Region 15 of the National Junior College Athletic Association.

In order to compete in athletics, a student must be enrolled for a minimum of 12 credits. (See Athletic Director for exact details of eligibility).

The College also offers an intramural program for both men and women which is coordinated by the Athletic Director, who should be contact for specific information on the intramural sports offered.

To safeguard your health during the coronavirus crisis, our health clubs are closed. We will provide updated information in the near future.

About the Michael J. Grant Campus Health Club

Our health club strives to make our community healthier by giving everyone the opportunity to incorporate fitness into their daily routine. We want our members to relax, get in shape, and have fun in a clean and safe environment. Our staff is dedicated to helping you reach and exceed your fitness goals.

Each yearly membership includes the following:

  • 25 Meter/ 8 Lane Pool
  • Water "Aquarobic" classes Monday through Friday at 11 a.m.
  • Free Weights
  • Cybex Strength Assisted Lifting Systems
  • Cybex Cardiovascular Equipment
  • Locker rooms/Saunas/Showers

To safeguard your health during the coronavirus crisis, our health clubs are closed. We will provide updated information in the near future.

About the Eastern Campus Health Club

Our health club strives to make our community healthier by giving everyone the opportunity to incorporate fitness into their daily routine. We want our members to relax, get in shape, and have fun in a clean and safe environment. Our staff is dedicated to helping you reach and exceed your fitness goals.

Each yearly membership includes the following:

  • 25 Yard Multi-Lane Pool
  • Free Weights
  • Full Fitness Suite
  • Rock Climbing Wall
  • Locker rooms/Showers

Music

The College offers a wide variety of musical activities and events for student participation, including being an active member in a music club, attending music concerts and/or performing in any of seven music groups listed below. These groups are offered through the College Music Program and provide a solid and comprehensive foundation for both music majors who intend to pursue music as a career and non-majors who are interested in performing. Each group is attached to a specific music course as indicated. These courses may have prerequisites and may require an audition. Concerts are normally given once a semester in December and May unless otherwise noted. Check the Arts and Entertainment Schedule for specific details. All events are free and open to the public.

All SCCC students, faculty, and staff, as well as members of the community, are welcome to participate in a music ensemble.

Symphonic Band (MUS133)
Instrumentation: woodwinds, brass and percussion
Music: standard wind band literature
No audition required: Open to all students and community members
Rehearsal time: Tuesday/Thursday 3:30-4:45 p.m.
Contact Professor: Mark Tse
 
College Choir (MUS135)
Personnel: mixed voices
Music: standard choral literature
Open to all student and community members
Rehearsal time: Tue/Thur 11:00-12:15
Contact Professor: Alice Cavanaugh
 
Suffolk Singers (MUS136)
Personnel: mixed voices
Music: chamber music literature
Prerequisite: audition
Corequisite: College Choir (MUS135
Rehearsal time: Tue/Thur 12:30-1:45
Contact Professor Alice Cavanaugh
 
Jazz Ensemble (MUS134)
Instrumentation: rhythm section, trumpets, trombones, and saxophones
Music: Swing, Latin, Funk, Be-bop, and Fusion
Prerequisite: audition
Rehearsal time: Tue/Thur 5:00-6:15
Contact Professor: Mark Tse

 

Guitar Ensemble (MUS131)
Instrumentation: acoustic guitar/electric bass
Music: standard classical guitar literature
Open to music majors and non-majors
Prerequisite: Fret-board Theory/Harmony (MUS113) or audition
Concerts: to be announced
Rehearsal time: Mon/Wed 2:00-3:15
Contact Professor James Erickson
 
Contemporary Music Ensemble (MUS138)
Instrumentation: open to all
Music: performance of music composed during the 20th Century with emphasis on works composed during last half of the century. The ensemble will also preview new commissioned works.
Prerequisite: Music Theory I (MUS122) and audition or permission of instructor
Rehearsal time: Mon/Wed 12:30-1:45 
Contact Professor Alexander Nohai-Seaman

 

College Orchestra (MUS132)
Instrumentation: strings, woodwind, brass, and percussion
Music: master works from the Baroque through 20th Century
Open to music majors, non-majors, and community members
Prerequisite: informal individual audition
Rehearsal time: Mon/Wed 4:00-5:15
Contact Professor Richard W. Wright

 

Theatre

Theatre Performances

Mainstage Performances are offered on the Ammerman Campus and occasionally on the Michael J. Grant and Eastern Campuses. Students are encouraged to get involved regardless of home campus or major. Audition notices are sent to students Suffolk email address. Students can earn academic credit for
work through THR151.

The Michael J. Grant Campus offers the Lively Arts Series which brings professional performances to the Van Nostrand Theatre.

Students receive one ticket to any performance with their College ID.

Health Services

About Health Services

Each campus has a Health Services Office staffed by registered nurses who work under the direction of a consulting physician. The college embraces a philosophy of preventative health practices as a sound approach for the campus community.  Specific services offered include the following:

  • emergency first aid and referral for injuries
  • treatment and referral for acute illnesses
  • personal health counseling
  • referrals to community services and agencies
  • accident and health insurance information
  • preventative health care brochures and information
  • immunization information, certification, and free clinics
  • special parking requests
  • medical clearance for students in health careers programs

Health Education Programs and Services

  • AIDS education
  • smoking cessation
  • drug and alcohol education
  • sexually transmitted diseases
  • birth control
  • date rape
  • eating disorders
  • blood pressure screening
  • HIV antibody testing
  • health fairs

For a listing of upcoming programs, visit the Calendar of Events.

The County of Suffolk, its officers, agents and employees assume no liability, expressed or implied, for the result of sickness or accidents involving personal injury to any student, whether in connection with the College instructional program wherever conducted or incidental to other activities on college properties or elsewhere. Filing of an application carries with it approval and consent with respect to the College policy governing accidents or illness as herein set forth.

Children’s Learning Centers

The Children's Learning Centers at Suffolk:

  • provide a comprehensive, developmentally appropriate child care program for children between the ages of six weeks and five years
  • are licensed by the New York State Department of Social Services
  • are open to children of Suffolk students, faculty, and staff; Suffolk County employees; and community residents
  • offer affordable rates, a sliding fee schedule, and a variety of child care tuition assistance programs
  • provide a warm, safe, healthy, caring and stimulating environment
  • provide flexible scheduling options that allows parents to work or attend college with the knowledge that their children will be nearby
  • welcome parents to visit their children whenever they choose
  • carefully select staff for their educational background, early childhood training, teaching experience, and their sensitivity to the individual needs of young children
  • maintain adult to child ratios that meet or exceed the requirements set by the New York State Department of Social Services
  • serve breakfast, lunch and snacks according to New York State Department of Health nutritional requirements

Ages Served: Six weeks through five years.

For further information:

        Campus Kids (Ammerman Campus)631-451-4388

        Suffolk Kid's Cottage (Michael J. GrantCampus): 631-851-6517

Accredited by: National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).

Dining Services

Suffolk County Community College and Aramark Higher Education are partners in creating and providing students and visitors to the College with an enjoyable dining experience.

Aramark has a long record of successfully serving more than 600 colleges and universities throughout North America. Together, we have enhanced the campus dining environments through changes such as:

- Bringing in a mix of national and proprietary restaurant brands
- Providing knowledgeable chefs, fresh food, healthier and vegan options
- Improving dining spaces and value

The College implements a $100 meal plan charge per semester for students taking nine credits or more on the Ammerman and Michael J. Grant campuses. (NOTE: online and off-campus courses do not count toward the nine+ credit total). Meal plan funds are then made available to students who want to purchase food or drinks in any of the campus dining locations and through campus vending machines. Purchases made through the meal plan are tax-free, creating significant dining value.

Please review the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) section of this site for more specifics about the College dining plan.

Good food is essential to a healthy life. Learn more about CampusDish and your meal plan here.

Restaurant Brands



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Bookstores

General Information

Due to the majority of Fall classes being held remotely, the SCCC Bookstores will remain closed, and continue to operate as a website only.

All materials will need to be ordered and shipped to your home.

Fall course materials are now available.

Go to the campus specific website for your course. Refer to your schedule to see which campus your class is being held. Even though they are online classes they are still campus specific.

Please note orders will take from 24 to 48 hours to process and can take a little longer if the product is being sourced from another location. You will receive an order confirmation once you place the order. Another email will be sent with tracking information once your order is processed. UPS Ground shipping is approximately $7.00. We suggest ordering all your materials in one order to avoid paying shipping for multiple orders.

Financial aid will be available, for eligible students on the website from August 24 - September 16. These funds can be used for course materials, supplies, technology, and anything you may need to start your semester (except for gift cards). Your SCCC Student ID would be your account number. If you have a question regarding financial aid availability, please contact the Financial Aid Office directly.

Fall Refund Policy

Do not open or use your materials until you are positive you are staying in the course. Refunds will be issued for all orders shipped back to the store no later than Friday September 11. To receive a refund, the item must be un-opened, un-used, and with the original receipt. Access codes are not returnable once opened, scratched, or accessed in any way. Weekend classes beginning September 12 - 13 will have until September 18 to ship back their orders.

Ammerman Campus

Location: Babylon Student Center
Phone: (631) 451-4379

Email the Bookstore
Ammerman Bookstore Website

Eastern Campus

Location: Peconic Building
Phone: (631) 548-2554

Email the Bookstore
Eastern Bookstore Website

Michael J. Grant Campus

Location: Captree Commons
Phone: (631) 851-6768

Email the Bookstore
Michael J. Grant Bookstore Website

Academic and Student Policies

Academic Policies

Matriculation Status and Change of Major

Matriculation

Matriculation Status

Matriculated status is granted to every student who is admitted into a degree or certificate program at Suffolk County Community College. Matriculation assures a student that the requirements for a particular program which are in effect at the time of matriculation will remain in effect until that student graduates.

Matriculated students may attend classes on a part-time (1-11.5 credits per semester) or full-time (12 or more credits per semester) basis and may schedule their classes during the days, evenings, weekends, or online on any of the college's three campuses. To be eligible for financial aid, students must be matriculated and taking courses required for or applicable to their current degree program.

Loss of matriculation occurs if the student:

  • applied and was accepted to the College, but never attended.
  • was matriculated in a program with limited seat availability (e.g., Automotive Service Specialist, Automotive Business, Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair, Emergency Medical Technician: Paramedic, Nursing, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, Toyota T-TEN Automotive Service, and Veterinary Science Technology) and did not attend during the semester of acceptance (excluding wintersession and summer session).
  • did not enroll in credit-bearing courses at the College for two or more consecutive semesters (excluding wintersession and summer session).
  • was academically dismissed or if the student's matriculation status was rescinded for academic reasons.
  • graduated from Suffolk and is not subsequently pursuing an additional degree or certificate.

Non-Matriculated Status

Non-matriculated status is assigned to any student who wishes to take classes at Suffolk County Community College but who has not been admitted into a degree or certificate program or for a student who has lost matriculation status. Non-matriculated students can register for 1 through 11.5 credits per semester and are not eligible for financial aid.

Non-matriculated students in good academic standing must apply for admission or readmission to continue in a program and are required to follow the curriculum requirements for the term of application. Students who have previously attended Suffolk, but are not in good academic standing, must see a Campus Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for evaluation of readmitting into a program.

Change of Degree, Certificate or Option
When a matriculated student decides to change his/her curriculum for the forthcoming semester, he/she must file a "Records Change Form." The form is to be returned to the Campus Registrar's Office. Students who want to change to a restricted curriculum should consult the catalog for admission criteria and submit the Readmission/ Request for Change to a Restricted Program form to the Campus Admissions Office.
Leave of Absence
Students enrolled in a restricted program with limited seat availability should follow the program's Leave of Absence procedures if they are planning to leave Suffolk for one or more semesters. While an approved leave does not guarantee a student a seat in the program upon returning, it does maintain the student's date of matriculation and give the student preference ahead of any new students if a seat is available. Contact the appropriate academic department for further information.
Readmission
Students who have previously attended Suffolk County Community College and wish to return for full-time study and are in "good academic standing" should contact the Campus Admissions Office for additional information at least several weeks prior to the beginning of the expected semester of re-entry. There is no guarantee of readmission to a specific program for a student who has withdrawn or been dropped from that program. Students who have previously attended Suffolk, but are not in good academic standing, must see a Campus Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.

Course Registration and Prerequisite Policies

Registration and Records
The Campus Registrar's Offices assist students with all activities related to their registration for classes, including adding and dropping classes and withdrawal from classes during the semester. Additional services include verifying student enrollment and academic status for insurance, financial aid and veteran benefits, and student class schedules. The Central Records Office maintains academic records for all students, verifies degree status for employment, evaluates eligibility for graduation, and certifies and mails official college transcripts.
Prerequisite Policy

All course prerequisite requirements must be met and verified by students prior to registration. This condition will be considered provisionally satisfied for registration purposes when it is assumed that these courses will be successfully completed prior to the start of courses that require the in-progress courses as prerequisites and with the provision that students will be deregistered if these courses are not successfully completed.

Matriculated students who have submitted documentation of prior high school and college experience will automatically be allowed or disallowed registration based on the presence or absence of prerequisite requirements in their histories. Whenever a student's history could include transfer courses or examination scores (such as Advanced Placement test scores) that would fulfill prerequisite requirements, it is the student's responsibility to ensure that this information is entered into his or her history by requesting a transfer evaluation in advance of registration.

Non-matriculated students, or other students who have not submitted documentation of prior high school and college experience, must submit a Prerequisite Waiver Request Form to an Academic Dean who has been identified by an Executive Dean as having responsibility for reviewing such requests. Students seeking prerequisite waivers must verify that they have met prerequisites by submitting high school or college transcripts, taking and passing proficiency examinations, or providing other documentation that may be deemed relevant, such as, SAT, ACT, and NYS Regents Examination scores. Students who do not have these documents will be given the Computerized Placement Test (CPT) to provide guidelines for placement.

Non-matriculated students registering for courses online are directed to email or fax the Prerequisite Waiver Request Form and copies of high school and college transcripts and other relevant documentation to an appropriate academic dean. Based on the evidence provided and the course placement guidelines, the Academic Dean will approve or reject the requested prerequisite waiver.

Guidelines for Employment and Credit Limits
While the College recognizes that most students must work at least part-time in order to meet their expenses during the academic year, studies have indicated that students’ grades fall off significantly if they must work more than 20 hours per week while taking twelve credits or more in any given semester.

Grading Policies

Grading System

Semester grades are available to students on the student portal (MySCCC) at the close of each semester. The instructor’s analysis of each student’s academic achievement will be in accordance with the following grading system:
A 90%-100%
B+ 85%-89%
B 80%-84%
C+ 75%-79%
C 70%-74%
D+ 65%-69%
D 60%-64%
F 59% or below

Students receiving grades of U/UN/R/INC/F/FN or a W (withdrawal) may affect a student's academic progress and can result in a student being placed on probation, dismissal, and/or losing financial aid. Students will be deregistered from courses where a prerequisite was not successfully completed due to a U/UN/R/INC/F/FN/W, or other grade as required by the course.

FN (Failure Due to Attendance)
The FN grade is given at the discretion of faculty and indicates a failing grade due to lack of attendance. The FN is equivalent to an F in grade point average computations.

INC (Incomplete)
Students who are ill or are unable for other valid reasons to complete the semesters work may at the discretion of the instructor receive an INC on their transcript. All work must be completed within the first four weeks of the subsequent semester; otherwise the INC will automatically become an F or will become a U for students in a remedial course.

S (Satisfactory)
This grade is given only for developmental courses, which do not satisfy degree requirements: RDG096, RDG098, RDG099, ENG009, ENG010, ENG011, ENG012, ESL011, ESL012, ESL013, ESL014, ESL015, ESL016, ESL017, ESL018, MAT001 and MAT001L. The S grade indicates successful completion of the course, but is not used in grade point average computation.

U (Unsatisfactory)
This grade is given only for developmental courses, which do not satisfy degree requirements: MAT001, MAT001L, MAT006, MAT007, MAT007L, MAT009, RDG096, RDG098, RDG099, ENG009, ENG010, ENG011, ENG012, ESL011, ESL012, ESL013, ESL014, ESL015, ESL016, ESL017, and ESL018. The U grade indicates the course was not successfully completed and is not used in grade point average computations.

UN (Unsatisfactory Due To Attendance)
This grade is given only for developmental courses, which do not satisfy degree requirements: MAT001, MAT001L, MAT006, MAT007, MAT007L, MAT009, RDG096, RDG098, RDG099, ENG009, ENG010, ENG011, ENG012, ESL011, ESL012, ESL013, ESL014, ESL015, ESL016, ESL017, and ESL018. The UN grade is given at the discretion of faculty and indicates an unsatisfactory grade due to lack of attendance for a developmental course. The UN grade indicates the course was not successfully completed and is not used in grade point average computations.

R (Repeat)
This grade is given only for developmental courses, which do not satisfy degree requirements: MAT001, MAT001L, MAT006, MAT007, MAT007L, MAT009, RDG096, RDG098, RDG099, ENG009, ENG010, ENG011, ENG012, ESL011, ESL012, ESL013, ESL014, ESL015, ESL016, ESL017, and ESL018. The R grade indicates the need for a student to re-register for the same course in a subsequent semester, usually because the student, while making progress in that course, has not yet completed all the course requirements. The R grade is not used in grade point average computations.

W (Withdrawal)
A student may withdraw from a course and receive a W any time up to the withdrawal deadline, which is the end of two-thirds of the semester or term. After the withdrawal deadline, a student may request to withdraw from a class only at the discretion of the instructor. The W is not considered a grade and is not used in grade point average computations.

AUD (Audit)
To audit a course, a student must notify the Campus Registrar while registering and paying for that course in accord with normal registration procedures. When a student audits a course, a grade of “AUD” will be recorded and no academic credit will be given. An auditor, by definition, is not required to take tests, write term papers or submit homework assignments, but is expected to participate in class to the extent deemed reasonable and necessary by the instructor. A student must inform the instructor at the first class meeting of his or her intention to take the course on an audit basis. Once this intention is stated, the student may not change from audit to credit status. Because some courses may be inappropriate for auditing, students should consult with the appropriate academic administrator before registering.

NOTE: Audited courses are not eligible for financial aid. Seniors: Suffolk County residents 60 years of age or older pay fees but no tuition.

Grade Changes

Students who believe they have received an incorrect grade should first discuss this matter with their instructor. If he or she agrees with the student's request, the instructor will submit a change of grade form to the appropriate Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. All faculty approved requests for grade changes must be made within two years of completion of the course. Changes submitted beyond two years require Executive Dean review.

A student may appeal an instructor's decision not to change a grade through the Course Grade Grievance Procedure, which must be initiated within the first three weeks of the semester following the semester in which the student took the course. This four-step procedure, which is outlined in the student handbook, continues, if necessary, through ascending levels of administrative authority. If this grievance is not resolved at the faculty, academic chair, or associate dean levels, the student may present his or her case in writing to the Executive Dean. Within ten calendar days of receipt of the student's written request, the Executive Dean may convene a committee to hear the grievance and to provide written recommendations. Students who have questions about the Grade Grievance Procedure should consult with the appropriate departmental office or dean.

Academic Standing

Grade Point Averages

A system of points is used to assess the quality of each students work for a semester or more and is computed as a cumulative grade point average. Grades earned by students have a numerical quality value as follows:

Quality Points Grade Per Credit Hour
A 4.0
B+ 3.5
B 3.0
C+ 2.5
C 2.0
D+ 1.5
D 1.0
F 0

A cumulative grade point average is computed by dividing the total number of quality points received by the number of credit hours earned. For example, a student who has earned 30 credit hours and has received a total of 60 quality points has a cumulative grade point average of 2.0. The following factors must also be taken into consideration:

a. When transfer credits are granted for courses completed at another college, no quality points or grades are awarded; hence, such credits do not affect the cumulative grade point average at SCCC.

b. A college-level course may be repeated one time. All course grades are retained on the student's transcript. For repeated courses, only the highest grade will count toward the cumulative grade point average and credit hours received by the student. A withdrawal is not considered a course attempt for this policy, however, the "W" grade will remain on the transcript. Contact the campus Office of Financial Aid to determine if the repeated course is covered by financial aid.

Academic Review

a. Following a change of curriculum or option, those courses with grades of D+, D and F that are specific to the old curriculum and not applicable to the new curriculum or applicable only as unrestricted electives, will be excluded in calculating the new cumulative grade point average, although all courses for which a student registers will appear on the transcript. It is the student's responsibility to petition the Campus Office of Academic Affairs to have his/her average computed. A student may have this rule applied to only one change of curriculum or option at the College.

b. A student who is readmitted to SCCC after an absence of two or more consecutive semesters and has successfully completed 12 credits after readmission with a 2.0 average, may petition the Campus Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for a review of his/her previous SCCC transcript. The transcript will be reviewed and grades of D+, D and F will be eliminated from computation of the grade point average, although all such courses will continue to appear on the transcript. This readmission review will be permitted only once before graduation.

Note: Once a student has authorized an academic review as described as an option above, he/she indicates an understanding and acceptance of the principle that when courses with D and D+ are excluded from calculation of the grade point average, the excluded courses and credits do not count toward graduation. An academic review includes ALL grades of D+, D and F. Once implemented, the actions taken pursuant to this policy are not revocable.

Academic Standing
Students are considered to be in good academic standing unless they have been dismissed from full-time status or their matriculation status has been rescinded.
Academic Probation

The College may place students on probation subject to dismissal any time they fail to maintain a minimum grade point average or do not complete an appropriate number of attempted credit hours.

Both full-time and part-time students will be placed on probation according to the standards outlined in this section. Students placed on probation do not lose their good academic standing. However, during the next semester they must raise their cumulative grade point average and/or the number of credit hours completed sufficiently to remove themselves from probation.

Full-time students who do not remove themselves from probation in the next semester will lose their full-time status. Once a student's matriculated status is rescinded, they may continue in attendance only as a non-matriculated student, enrolling for fewer than 12 credits.

Part-time students placed on probation are not subject to dismissal. However, if they do not remove themselves from probation in the next semester, their matriculated status will be rescinded and they may continue in attendance only as a non-matriculated part-time student.

These standards may be waived when such action is deemed to be in the best interest of the student. Full-time students who are dismissed and part-time students whose matriculation is rescinded may appeal as indicated under "Dismissal."

Any full-time student will automatically be placed on probation if he/she fails to meet either grade point average or rate of completion as outlined in the following criteria:

Credit Hours Attempted Minimum Cumulative GPA
(Grade Point Average)

Rate of Completion
(semester or cumulative)

12-15 1.6 50%
16-30 1.7 50%
31-45 1.8 66%
46 or more 2.0 66%

Any part-time student will automatically be placed on probation if he/she fails to meet either grade point average or rate of completion as outlined in the following criteria:

Credit Hours Attempted Minimum Cumulative GPA
(Grade Point Average)

Rate of Completion
(semester or cumulative)

0-15 1.6 50%
16-30 1.7 50%
31-45 1.8 66%
46 or more 2.0 66%

A student will remain on probation until such time as subsequent academic performance removes him/her from probationary status. Full-time students on academic probation may not register for more than four courses, not to exceed 14 credits, and are directed to see an academic advisor or counselor early in the next semester. Probation is noted on the student’s unofficial and official transcript.

Academic Dismissal

Any full-time student who is placed on probation for two consecutive semesters will be dismissed from full-time status. Dismissal will be noted on the student’s transcript. Students who are dismissed have the right to appeal if they feel an error has been made or other extenuating circumstances exist. Appeal for reinstatement is made in writing to the Campus Office of Academic Affairs. Appeals for reinstatement are considered by the campus Academic Appeals Board. Should the Campus Office of Academic Affairs grant the appeal, the student shall be reinstated with probationary status. A student thus readmitted will be “in good academic standing” with probationary status.

Part-time students who are placed on academic probation for two consecutive semesters are not subject to dismissal. However, their matriculation status will be rescinded. Such students should carefully review their academic plans with one of the campus counselors in order to improve their chances for success. Part-time students may avail themselves of the above appeal procedure to regain their matriculation.

Absences and Attendance

The College expects that each student will exercise personal responsibility with regard to class attendance. All students are expected to attend every class session of each course for which they are registered. Students are responsible for all that transpires in class whether or not they are in attendance, even if absences are the result of late registration or add/drop activity at the beginning of a term as permitted by college policy. The College defines excessive absence or lateness as more than the equivalent of one week of class meetings during the semester. Excessive absence or lateness may lead to failure in, or removal from, the course. Absences due to religious observance will be deemed an excused absence with no negative consequences.

Any student who enters a class after the first meeting, regardless of reason, is accountable for all course requirements including assignments and attendance. A student may be required to drop or withdraw from a course when, in the judgment of the instructor, absences have been excessive. A student may also be withdrawn from a course by the Associate Dean of Student Services or the Student Conduct Board following a disciplinary hearing for violating the Student Code of Conduct as described in the student handbook.

Withdrawal

A student may withdraw from a course and receive a W any time between the end of the add/drop period and the withdrawal deadline, which is the end of two-thirds of the semester or term. After this date, a student may request a withdrawal using a Course Withdrawal form, but requires the signature of the instructor.

Official withdrawal from the College means that a student voluntarily separates himself or herself from the College by dropping all courses at any time during the academic term.

Withdrawal Forms can be found on the college website or in the MySCCC portal. They are submitted to any Campus Registrar's Office.

If a student drops a course or courses prior to the end of the refund period, the student’s academic record will not reflect these courses. If a student officially withdraws from the College after the refund period but before the withdrawal date specified in the academic calendar, the student’s academic record will show all courses for which he or she registered along with a grade of W for each course. The official withdrawal will be noted on the student’s academic record. In addition, withdrawal from a course is considered a non-successful course attempt for purposes of financial aid satisfactory progress requirements. Excessive withdrawals may result in academic probation or academic dismissal.

Honor Designations/Societies

Dean's List

Outstanding scholastic achievement at Suffolk County Community College is recognized each semester by the compilation of the Dean’s List. Full-time matriculated students who have completed a minimum of 12 credit hours during the semester with no incompletes and a semester grade point average of 3.5 or higher qualify for the Dean's List. This academic achievement is noted on the student's permanent record.

NOTE: Developmental courses do not qualify because they do not carry credit towards the GPA.

Graduation "With Distinction" and "With Highest Distinction"

Students of the graduating class who have attained at least a 3.5 cumulative grade point average are graduated "with distinction". Those students who have attained at least a 3.8 cumulative grade point average are graduated "with highest distinction". An academic achievement of "with distinction" or "with highest distinction" is noted on the student's permanent record. Furthermore, students who graduate having completed either the Honors Program Diploma Sequence or Recognition Sequence have this academic honor noted on their permanent record.

Pi Alpha Sigma

Pi Alpha Sigma is a college honors designation. Students who have achieved a 3.5 cumulative grade point average, with no incomplete grades, and have completed at least 36 credits at Suffolk County Community College receive this designation. This academic designation is also noted on the student's permanent record.

Honor Societies

Academic Integrity

Student Code of Conduct

The College Student Code of Conduct expressly prohibits "any and all forms of academic or other dishonesty". While this code should be read broadly and does not define such conduct in exhaustive terms, the following conducts clearly falls under the heading of academic dishonesty.

Cheating

Any form of cheating, be it on a formal examination, informal quiz or other submitted material, is a violation of college conduct. Copying material from fellow students or from other sources, including electronic devices, during an examination may result in a failing grade for the course and/or serious disciplinary sanctions as outlined in the Code of Conduct. When students work together on a project, this becomes a joint responsibility for a group so designated and should be limited to the people and resources agreed upon with the instructor.

Plagiarism

Students should realize that presenting the words and ideas of others as their own is dishonest. In writing, students must fully credit the source of any quoted, paraphrased, or summarized passages and any ideas which they have borrowed. Failure to conform to these academic standards is plagiarism and may result in a failing grade for the course and/or serious disciplinary sanctions as outlined in the Code of Conduct.

Degree Requirements

Graduation Requirements

All candidates for degrees from Suffolk County Community College must meet the following general requirements. They must:

  1. Attain a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.0.
  2. Attain a grade point average of not less than 2.0 in their major field of study.
  3. Complete the Suffolk County Community College Core Education Graduation Requirements.
  4. Satisfactorily complete any developmental courses (or course sequences) into which they were placed.
  5. Complete the course requirements with 60 credits or more in their curriculum as specified in the Curricula.
  6. Complete at least 30 resident credit hours of the required course work offered by Suffolk County Community College. Resident credits specifically exclude Advanced Placement, challenge examination, CLEP, portfolio, and all categories of transfer credit.
  7. Not use extra credits from courses already taken in lieu of any individual course requirement in any curriculum.
  8. Pay or satisfactorily adjust all college fees and meet all other obligations.
  9. As a matriculated student, file an Application for Graduation online. Application deadlines are December 1 for January graduation, April 1 for May graduation and May 1 for August graduation.

A graduate who wishes to obtain a second degree in a different curriculum must complete a minimum of 30 additional credits, including the special course requirements of the second curriculum.

Candidates for the certificate must complete all curriculum requirements, in which at least half of the coursework is resident credit hours offered by SCCC, with a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.0, both cumulatively and in their major field of study. Resident credits specifically exclude advanced placement, challenge examination, CLEP, portfolio, and all categories of transfer credit.

NOTE: Wide opportunities are available for student advising both through the academic departments and through the Office of Student Services. However, each student is ultimately responsible for selecting courses which satisfy graduation requirements for specific degree and certificate programs.

College Seminar Requirement

Full-time day students in all programs must successfully complete COL101: College Seminar or equivalent. See Course Descriptions for a list of equivalent courses. Students are expected to enroll in this class in their first semester. Students who have taken a college seminar course are not required to enroll in an additional one, even if it is specific to their program. The College Seminar requirement may be waived for students who complete 12 credit hours of transferable college-level work on a college campus prior to enrolling at SCCC. Students who complete at least half of their work as part-time students or full-time evening students may also waive the college seminar requirement.

Substitution/Waiver of Degree Requirement

On a limited basis, students may submit substitution/waiver forms to the appropriate academic chair for their review and approval. These are then sent for approval to the appropriate Campus Associate Dean. Requests for substitutions will be evaluated on the basis of the equivalence of the proposed substitution to the curriculum requirement.

The physical education requirement may be waived for students who complete at least half of their curriculum requirements as part-time students or as full-time evening students. Students with medical concerns should contact the Physical Education Academic Chair on their campus to discuss courses that will be appropriate for them. Students who served in the United States military and completed basic training may be eligible to transfer in their physical education credits based upon their Military Transcript.

The necessary forms for requesting a waiver or substitution of a course to meet degree requirements can be obtained from the campus academic departments and/or the Campus Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Student Policies

Electronic Devices

Students' use of cell phones, computers and other electronic devices during classes may be regulated according to course policies established by individual instructors. Misuse of such devices may subject students to provisions of the Student Code of Conduct relating to disruptive classroom behavior. Unsanctioned use of such devices may carry serious penalties, including but not limited to course failure or dismissal from the College. Exceptions may apply to students with documented disabilities who may need to use a device as an approved accommodation.

Student Identification Card

All students are required to obtain and carry a College photo identification card. The ID card is needed to access library and computer center services, and for use with the College’s meal plan. It must be presented in College offices in order to receive services. Schedule and locations of ID card stations can be found on the College website. Replacement cards are available for a cost of $12. Once the semester begins, registered students without a Suffolk County Community College ID card will be billed a $25 card non-compliance fee and will be denied services until the card is obtained. Photographs for ID cards are taken in the following locations:


Ammerman Campus
Registrar's Office, Ammerman Building
Campus Activities, Babylon Student Center
Public Safety, Annex Building

Eastern Campus
Public Safety, Peconic Building, Room 119

Michael J. Grant Campus
Public Safety, North Cottage
Student Code of Conduct

The college community is committed to fostering a campus environment that is conducive to academic inquiry, a productive campus life and thoughtful study and discourse. The student conduct program within the Division of Student Affairs is committed to an educational and developmental process that balances the interests of individual students with the interests of the college community.

For additional information, the Student Code of Conduct can be viewed online.

Information Technology Policies and Guidelines

The Student Code of Conduct prohibits certain behavior related to the use of the College technology resources and requires compliance with College policies. The full policy can be obtained from the Associate Dean of Student Services office on each campus, or in the Information Technology Policies and Guidelines.

The policy obligates users to respect the rights of others, avoid uses that burden system resources or introduce viruses, and protect the secrecy of passwords. Users are also prohibited from engaging in a variety of listed activities. The policy includes provisions on privacy rights, monitoring of use and sanctions for violations. All users are responsible for knowing the college's policy and are deemed to have accepted the restrictions by utilizing the technology resources.

Student Online Services, Student Portal, Email Accounts

Suffolk County Community College official web-based student portal (MySCCC) and student email accounts are an official means of communication to all full- and part-time students enrolled in credit-bearing classes. All such students are required to activate their student portal and email accounts. Official College communications may include, but are not limited to, registration information, financial aid information and other financial statements, student health compliance information and academic progress notifications.

The College expects that students shall receive and read their electronic communications on a frequent and timely basis. Failure to do so shall not absolve the student from knowing of and complying with the contents of all electronic communications, some of which will be time-critical.

The College has established policies for the acceptable use of computing resources. The Information Technology Policies and Guidelines provides additional information.

Medical Leave

A Medical Leave may be granted, upon request, to any matriculated student who is unable to attend classes for an extended period of time due to a documented illness, injury, or medical or psychological condition. Under the aforementioned circumstances, a Medical Leave may be granted to a student who is forced to withdraw during a semester as well as to a student who is unable to enroll in a subsequent semester. To request a Medical Leave, students should follow the procedure outlined below.

  1. Request a Medical Leave, in writing during the semester they withdraw, from the Campus Associate Dean of Student Services. The request must indicate the medical reason and the period of the leave. Documentation by a physician or other appropriate health care provider is required.
  2. In the event that a student is incapable of requesting a leave himself/herself, the request may be submitted by a parent, spouse, or other appropriate individual. In such cases, documentation of the student’s incapacity must be provided by the appropriate health care provider.
  3. The Campus Associate Dean of Student Services shall have the final authority to determine whether the request for a Medical Leave is granted. All such determinations shall be made in writing.
  4. In the event that a Medical Leave is granted, the Associate Dean shall: complete the class withdrawal process for the student (i.e., if initiated and not previously completed); and authorize a leave of absence for the student from the Admissions Office (i.e., if the student is enrolled in a restricted curriculum with limited seat availability).
  5. Being granted a Medical Leave during a semester does not mean that a student’s grades or financial aid will not be negatively impacted, nor does it mean that the student will be entitled to a tuition refund. Accordingly, students should be aware that existing policies will be followed in making these determinations. Whenever possible, students are strongly encouraged to determine the consequences of withdrawing during a semester before requesting a Medical Leave.
Medical Suspension

Suffolk County Community College strives to promote the health and safety of all members of the college community by providing services in the areas of student health, counseling, and public safety and by enforcing student conduct regulations. In accordance with law, and in order to ensure that the institution and its members may carry out their proper activities without substantial interference or danger of physical harm, the College has implemented its policy and procedures for the medical suspension of students. A student may be subject to medical suspension if it is determined that the student is suffering from a physical, emotional, or psychological condition, and, as a result of this condition, engages, threatens to engage, or may engage in behavior that:

  1. Reasonably poses a danger or threat of causing physical harm to others; and/or
  2. Substantially impedes the lawful activities of other members of the campus community, or the educational processes, activities or functions of the College or its personnel.

For additional information, the Medical Suspension Policycan be viewed online.

Tobacco Products

On August 27, 2015, Suffolk County Community College officially became tobacco-free. In order to provide a clean and healthy environment for all students, employees and visitors, the College implemented a tobacco-free policy that will:

    • Protect Suffolk students, faculty, staff and visitors from unwanted and involuntary exposure to tobacco and passive smoke;
    • Prohibit the use of all tobacco and tobacco-derived products on all College grounds;
    • Provide resources for tobacco users to get the help they need to quit for good.

We encourage all individuals who use tobacco and tobacco-derived products to access smoking cessation programs and services at the College Health Services Offices. We invite tobacco users to review the Smoke Free Policy. This policy shall be strictly enforced and violators will be subject to conduct procedures outlined in the Student Code of Conduct and/or fines.

Sexual Violence, Sexual Harassment and Title IX

Suffolk County Community College prohibits sexual misconduct, harassment and sex discrimination including sexual violence, domestic violence, dating and intimate partner violence, stalking, sexual coercion or other threats of violence or intimidation. These can be verbal, non-verbal, physical, written or electronic (i.e. text or social media). The College is committed to providing options, support and assistance to victims/survivors to ensure they can continue to participate in college-wide and campus programs, activities and employment. The College has prevention, training and educational programs in place to protect all members of the college community. These include information about how to report, on- and off-campus resources, rights and responsibilities. Students have rights, regardless of whether the crime or violation occurs on campus, off campus, or while studying abroad. For additional information on the Student's Bill of Rights and the College Sexual Violence Policy see Sexual Harassment and Title IX.

Options for Reporting Sexual Violence

All students have the right to make a report to Public Safety, local law enforcement and/or State Police or choose not to report; to report the incident to the College; to be protected by the College from retaliation for reporting an incident, and to receive assistance from the College. Contact Public Safety at any time by calling 631-451-4242 or dialing 311 from any college phone. In case of emergency, call 911 to contact local law enforcement. To contact the New York State Police 24-hour hotline call 1-844-845-7269. State wide resources are available at every SUNY campus online.

See Student's Bill of Rights for additional information.

If you have an alleged claim of sexual harassment or sex discrimination/sexual violence by a student, complaints should be submitted to the Office of the Associate Dean of Student Services/Deputy Title IX Coordinator for the campus at which the alleged harassment occurred:

Ammerman Campus or Sayville Center
Dr. Edward Martinez
Ammerman Building, Room 200C
Selden, NY 11784
martineze@sunysuffolk.edu
(631) 451-4790

Michael J. Grant Campus
Dr. Meryl Rogers
Caumsett Hall, Room 106
Brentwood, NY 11717
rogersm@sunysuffolk.edu
(631) 851-6521

Eastern Campus
Dr. Mary Reese
Peconic Building, Room 228E
Riverhead, NY 11901
reesem@sunysuffolk.edu
(631) 548-2515

If you have an alleged claim of sexual harassment or sex discrimination/sexual violence by a contractor, visitor or guest, faculty member, administrator or employee at any campus, complaints should be submitted to the Civil Rights Compliance Officers:

Christina Vargas, Title IX Coordinator
Ammerman Campus, NFL Bldg., Suite 230
533 College Road,
Selden, New York 11784-2899
vargasc@sunysuffolk.edu
(631) 451-4950


Dr. Dionne Walker-Belgrave, Deputy Title IX Coordinator
Ammerman Campus, NFL Bldg., Suite 230
533 College Road,
Selden, New York 11784-2899
walkerd@sunysuffolk.edu
(631) 451-4051

If you are a victim of sexual violence, the College has a trained team from Student Affairs, Public Safety, and the Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Coordinators. This team provides information to you about your rights, notifies you about resources, and offers reasonable interim measures, such as a change in schedule, a no-contact order or other actions. Anyone who experiences, observes, or hears about an incident should report it to the Title IX Coordinator. The Title IX Coordinator oversees the complaint process, answers questions, and offers assistance and services to anyone experiencing harassment, discrimination or sexual violence. Mental Health Services coordinators and Student Health Services are privileged and confidential resources that will not report crimes to law enforcement or College officials without your permission, except for extreme circumstances, such as a health and/or safety emergencies.

Sexual Violence and the Law

New York State Law contains legal provisions defining the crimes related to sexual violence. The College Annual Security report is updated annually according to federal law and lists important definitions related to these and other crimes. To review them, visit the Public Safety website.

SUNY Felony Convictions Policy

State University of New York (SUNY) policy prohibits Suffolk County Community College admission applications from inquiring into an applicant’s prior criminal history. After acceptance, the College shall inquire if the student previously has been convicted of a felony if such individual seeks participation in clinical or field experiences, internships or study abroad programs. The information required to be disclosed under SUNY policy regarding such felony convictions shall be reviewed by a standing College committee consistent with the legal standards articulated in the New York State Correction Law.

Students who have previously been convicted of a felony are advised that their prior criminal history may impede their ability to complete the requirements of certain academic programs and/or to meet licensure requirements for certain professions, including, but not limited to:

  • Sitting for the National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE) required for certification and employment as a physical therapist assistant in New York State;
  • Becoming certified in New York as a physical therapist assistant;
  • Sitting for the national certification examination for occupational therapy assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT);
  • Attaining licensure in New York State as an occupational therapy assistant;
  • Taking the licensing examination for licensure as a practical nurse or registered nurse;
  • Obtaining New York State licensure as a practical nurse or registered nurse;
  • Obtaining certification as a pharmacy technician from the national Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB);
  • Obtaining certification from the American Board of Opticianry & National Contact Lens Examiners (ABO-NCLE); and
  • Obtaining certification as an ophthalmic assistant technician or ophthalmic technician from the Joint Commission on Allied Health Personnel in Ophthalmology (JCAHPO).

Students who have concerns about such matters are advised to contact the department chair of their intended academic program. Applicants and students with criminal convictions who are interested in pursuing a program leading to professional licensure or certification are also encouraged to consult with the appropriate licensing/certification authority. Students with criminal convictions who are considering transfer to or subsequent enrollment in a program at another institution that will lead to professional licensure or certification are also encouraged to consult with the appropriate licensing/certification authority.

Non-Discrimination Notice

Suffolk County Community College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, sex, age, marital status, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, familial status, pregnancy, predisposing genetic characteristics, equal pay compensation-sex, national origin, military or veteran status, domestic violence victim status, criminal conviction or disability in its admissions, programs and activities, or employment. This applies to all employees, students, applicants or other members of the College community (including, but not limited to, vendors and visitors). Grievance procedures are available to interested persons by contacting either of the Civil Rights Compliance Officers/Coordinators listed below. Retaliation against a person who files a complaint, serves as a witness, or assists or participates in the investigation of a complaint in any manner is strictly prohibited.

Equal Opportunity and Anti-Discrimination Policy

Discrimination / Harassment / Retaliation Complaint Form

The following persons have been designated to handle inquiries regarding the College non-discrimination polices:

Civil Rights Compliance Officers

Christina Vargas
Chief Diversity Officer/Title IX Coordinator
Ammerman Campus, NFL Bldg., Suite 230
533 College Road, Selden, New York 11784-2899
vargasc@sunysuffolk.edu
(631) 451-4950

or

Dionne Walker-Belgrave
Affirmative Action Officer/Deputy Title IX Coordinator
Ammerman Campus, NFL Bldg., Suite 230
533 College Road, Selden, New York 11784-2899
walkerd@sunysuffolk.edu
(631) 451-4051

In an emergency, contact Public Safety to make a report 24 hours a day/7 days a week by calling (631) 451-4242 or dialing 311 from any College phone.

Inquiries or complaints concerning alleged civil rights violations in the College education admissions, programs, and activities may also be directed to:

Office for Civil Rights (OCR) – Enforcement Office
U.S. Department of Education
32 Old Slip, 26th Floor
New York, NY 10005-2500
Telephone: (646) 428-3800
Fax: (646) 428-3843
TDD:  (877) 521-2172 Email:  OCR.NewYork@ed.gov
Also refer to:  https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/index.html

NYS Division of Human Rights
Long Island (Suffolk)
New York State Office Building
250 Veterans Memorial Highway, Suite 2B-49
Hauppauge, NY 11788
Telephone: (631) 952-6434
TDD: (718) 741-8300
Email: InfoLongIsland@dhr.ny.gov
Also refer to: https://dhr.ny.gov/complaint

Inquiries or complaints concerning discrimination in employment practices may also be directed to:

NYS Division of Human Rights
Long Island (Suffolk)
New York State Office Building
250 Veterans Memorial Highway, Suite 2B-49
Hauppauge, NY 11788
Telephone: (631) 952-6434
TDD: (718) 741-8300
Email: InfoLongIsland@dhr.ny.gov
Also refer to: https://dhr.ny.gov/complaint

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
New York District Office
33 Whitehall Street, 5th Floor
New York, NY 10004
Telephone: (800) 669-4000
Fax: (212) 336-3790
TTY: (800) 669-6820
ASL Video Phone: (844) 234-5122
Also refer to: https://www.eeoc.gov/field/newyork/charge.cfm

Suffolk County Community College is committed to fostering a diverse community of outstanding faculty, staff, and students, as well as ensuring equal opportunity and non-discrimination in employment, education, access to services, programs, and activities, including career and technical education opportunities.

A copy of the postsecondary career and technical education courses offered by the College is available and may be obtained on our website at: www.sunysuffolk.edu/explore-academics/college-catalog or by calling the Office of Admissions at (631) 451-4000 to request a mailing.

If you think that you have been subjected to discrimination under a WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity, you may file a complaint within 180 days from the date of the alleged violation with either: 

Suffolk County Community College’s Civil Rights Compliance Officers listed above or with: 
 
The Director, Civil Rights Center (CRC), U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Room N-4123, Washington, DC 20210 or electronically as directed on the CRC website at www.dol.gov/crc
 
If you file your complaint with Suffolk County Community College, you must wait either until the college issues a written Notice of Final Action, or until 90 days have passed (whichever is sooner), before filing with the Civil Rights Center (see address above). 
 
If the college does not give you a written Notice of Final Action within 90 days of the day on which you filed your complaint, you may file a complaint with CRC before receiving that Notice. However, you must file your CRC complaint within 30 days of the 90-day deadline (in other words, within 120 days after the day on which you filed your complaint with the college). 
 
If the college does give you a written Notice of Final Action on your complaint, but you are dissatisfied with the decision or resolution, you may file a complaint with CRC. You must file your CRC complaint within 30 days of the date on which you received the Notice of Final Action. 

Mandatory Student Immunizations: Measles, Mumps and Rubella / Meningitis

In accordance with New York State Public Health Law Section 2165, all students enrolled for at least six (6) semester hours, or the equivalent, at Suffolk County Community College, who were born on or after January 1, 1957, must provide acceptable written proof of immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella in accordance with standards approved by the New York State Department of Health.

Acceptable proof of immunity consists of a Certificate of Immunization signed and stamped by a physician or licensed health care provider which documents measles, mumps, and rubella immunity. Students must submit this certificate or equivalent to the Health Services Offices on their home campus and document at least partial compliance with the immunization requirements before they will be permitted to register for classes. Partial compliance shall be defined as one dose of measles, mumps, and rubella immunization.

In addition, proof of an honorable discharge from the armed services within 10 years prior to the date of application to Suffolk County Community College shall also qualify as a certificate enabling a student to attend classes pending actual receipt of immunization records from the armed services.

Students who are in partial compliance will be notified by the Vice President of Student Affairs that they will be suspended from their classes if they do not fully comply with the immunization requirements within the first 30 days of the semester (45 days for students transferring from another state or county). Students who are suspended and who subsequently fail to comply with the immunization requirements will be administratively withdrawn from their classes and prevented from registering for subsequent semesters.

Immunization records shall be maintained on each campus at the Health Services Office, which shall consider such information as confidential and subject to the College Records Policy. The Vice President of Student Affairs shall be responsible for the completion and timely submission to the Commissioner of Health of the annual survey of immunization levels of students attending Suffolk County Community College.

Students who cannot afford a private physician will be directed to the County Health Department for information regarding free immunizations. Persons may be exempt from any or all of these requirements if a physician certifies in writing that the immunizations may be detrimental to their health. In addition, persons who hold genuine and sincere religious beliefs which are contrary to immunization may be exempt after submitting a statement to that effect to the Associate Dean of Student Services on their home campus.

Students who are registered solely for online courses that do not require any campus presence are exempt from these requirements.

Should a suspected case of measles, mumps, or rubella occur on a campus, the office of the Vice President of Student Affairs will evaluate the case in conjunction with the County Health Department and the Health Services Office and consulting physician. While awaiting serological confirmation, immunization records will be reviewed and susceptible individuals identified. If the suspected case is confirmed, the office of the Vice President of Student Affairs will notify all susceptible students and staff to be immunized. Susceptible students who are unable to be immunized may be required to remain off-campus until the Health Department deems it safe for such individuals to return.

This Mandatory Student Immunization Policy will be included in the College Catalog and the campus Student Handbooks.

Required Acknowledgement of Meningitis Information: In accordance with New York State Public Health Law Section 2167, all students enrolled for at least six (6) semester hours, or the equivalent, at Suffolk County Community College, are required to acknowledge that they have received information about meningococcal disease and vaccination. In addition, such students are required to indicate that they either have received the appropriate vaccination within the past 10 years or have decided not to obtain immunization again the disease. Students who fail to submit the required acknowledgement will be blocked from registration activity and subject to withdrawal.

Please refer to the College Legal Affairs website to review the Student Immunization Requirements Policy.

Notification Of Student Rights Under The Family Educational Rights And Privacy Act

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords eligible students certain rights with respect to their education records. (An eligible student under FERPA is a student who is 18 years of age or older or who attends a postsecondary institution at any age.) These rights include:

    1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days after the day Suffolk County Community College receives a request for access. A student should submit to the Chief Campus Student Affairs Officer on their home campus (the Associate Dean of Student Services) a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. A meeting will be scheduled within a reasonable period of time, at which time the records may be reviewed.
    2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA. A student who wishes to ask the College to amend a record should first bring this request to the Chief Campus Student Affairs Officer on their home campus (the Associate Dean of Student Services), who will discuss the matter with the student and attempt to arrive at a mutually acceptable resolution. If an agreement cannot be reached, the student will be notified of the decision and their right to a hearing. The student may then request a hearing to challenge the contents of the record. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures is outlined in the College Student Records Policy and will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
    3. The right to provide written consent before the College discloses personally identifiable information (PII) from the student's education records, except to the extent FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. The College discloses education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research or support staff position; a person retained as a contractor, consultant, volunteer, or other party to whom the College has outsourced services or functions authorized by, or under contract to the College, to perform a special task, such as an attorney or auditor; a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving in an official capacity, such as membership on a disciplinary or grievance committee. A school official has a legitimate educational interest in reviewing or assessing a student’s education records if the school official is: performing a task that is specified in his/her position description or contract; performing a task directly related to a student’s education; performing a task related to student discipline; providing a service or benefit relating to the student or student's family; and/or maintaining the safety and security of the campus. Upon request, the College also discloses education records without consent to officials of another institution in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.
    4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administered FERPA is: Student Privacy Policy Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202. College policy explains in detail the procedures used by the College for compliance with FERPA. Copies of the College’s Student Records Policy may be found in the following offices: Campus Registrar and Associate Dean of Student Services on the Ammerman, Eastern and Michael J. Grant campuses, as well as the offices of the College Registrar, Vice President for Student Affairs, and the Office of Legal Affairs in the Norman F. Lechtrecker Building on the Ammerman Campus. The Student Records Policy is also posted on the College’s website. Questions concerning FERPA may be referred to the Associate Dean of Student Services on each campus or the College Registrar or the Vice President for Student Affairs in the Norman F. Lechtrecker Building on the Ammerman Campus.
Directory Information Notice

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), a Federal law, requires that Suffolk County Community College, with certain exceptions, require your written consent prior to the disclosure of personally identifiable information from your education records. However, the College may disclose appropriately designated "Directory Information" without written consent if considered appropriate by College officials, unless you have advised the College to the contrary in accordance with College procedures.

The College hereby designates the following items of student information as public or "Directory Information"; This does not mean, however, that the College will indiscriminately release such information about students. Requests for Directory Information on all SCCC students or categories of students will generally not be honored. The College specifically excludes lists or compilations of data on all students or categories of students from its designation of Directory Information under FERPA, even if such list or compilation of data consists only of information which, if related to an individual student, would otherwise constitute Directory Information. Release will generally be restricted to information on individual students only, and each request will be considered on an individual basis by the Vice President of Student Affairs, the College Registrar, the Campus Associate Dean of Student Services, or the Office of Legal Affairs.


Name
Address (permanent, local and email)
Telephone number (permanent and local)
Photograph
Dates and status of enrollment
Major field of study
Honors, awards or special recognition
Weight and height, if a member of an athletic team
Prior schools attended and degrees awarded
Participation in officially recognized sports and activities

Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of this information under FERPA. To withhold disclosure, a student must complete the "Request to Prevent Disclosure of Directory Information" form. This form must be submitted to the campus Registrar's Office, and will be in effect until the student revokes the request in writing. The College assumes that failure on the part of any student to specifically request the withholding of "Directory Information" indicates individual approval for disclosure.

Campus Crime Statistics

Suffolk County Community College hereby informs students that information on campus crime statistics, safety awareness, crime prevention, sexual assault, alcohol and drug education, and sexual harassment is available on the College website at www.sunysuffolk.edu/safety. Crime statistics for SCCC, as well as other colleges throughout the United States, are also available online through the U.S. Department of Education. For additional information, contact the College Director of Public Safety at 631-451-4212.

Religious Observance Policy and Procedures

Beginning in the fall of 2018, the College implemented a secular calendar in order to treat all religious observances equitably and to minimize disruptions to class schedules. The College adopted a Religious Observance Policy and Procedures to complement the implementation of a secular calendar.

As provided for in New York State Education Law § 224-a, student absences from class necessitated by religious observance will be deemed an excused absence, with no academic consequences. Students must notify their professor in advance of their religious observance, via their College email accounts or otherwise in writing, of their intention to be absent from a particular class due to a religious observance; notification should occur at least one week prior to the religious observance. Observing students shall be granted reasonable arrangements and/or be permitted a reasonable amount of time to make up missed quizzes, tests, assignments, and activities covered in their absence.

Please refer to the College’s Religious Observance Policy and Procedures, which are available on the College Academic Calendar webpage, for additional information. Religious Observance FAQs are also available online for additional information.

New York State Education Law § 224-A

  1. No person shall be expelled from or be refused admission as a student to an institution of higher education for the reason that he or she is unable, because of his or her religious beliefs, to register or attend classes or to participate in any examination, study or work requirements on a particular day or days.
  2. Any student in an institution of higher education who is unable, because of his or her religious beliefs, to attend classes on a particular day or days shall, because of such absence on the particular day or days, be excused from any examination or any study or work requirements.
  3. It shall be the responsibility of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to make available to each student who is absent from school, because of his or her religious beliefs, an equivalent opportunity to register for classes or make up any examination, study or work requirements which he or she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to the said student such equivalent opportunity.
  4. If registration, classes, examinations, study or work requirements are held on Friday after four o’clock post meridian or on Saturday, similar or makeup classes, examinations, study or work requirements or opportunity to register shall be made available on other days, where it is possible and practicable to do so. No special fees shall be charged to the student for these classes, examinations, study or work requirements or registration held on other days.
  5. In effectuating the provisions of this section, it shall be the duty of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to exercise the fullest measure of good faith. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of his or her availing himself or herself of the provisions of this section.
  6. Any student, who is aggrieved by the alleged failure of any faculty or administrative officials to comply in good faith with the provisions of this section, shall be entitled to maintain an action or proceeding in the supreme court of the county in which such institution of higher education is located for the enforcement of his or her rights under this section.


    6-a It shall be the responsibility of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to give written notice to students of their rights under this section, informing that each student who is absent from school, because of his or her religious beliefs, must be given an equivalent opportunity to register for classes or make up any examination, study or work requirements which he or she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to such student such equivalent opportunity.

  7. As used in this section, the term "institution of higher education" shall mean any institution of higher education, recognized and approved by the Regents of the University of the State of New York, which provides a course of study leading to the granting of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Such term shall not include any institution which is operated, supervised or controlled by a church or by a religious or denominational organization whose educational programs are principally designed for the purpose of training ministers or other religious functionaries or for the purpose of propagating religious doctrines. As used in this section, the term "religious belief" shall mean beliefs associated with any corporation organized and operated exclusively for religious purposes, which is not disqualified for tax exemption under section 501 of the United States Code.

Special Academic Programs

Honors Program

Program Overview

The Honors Program offers interdisciplinary learning opportunities for academically talented and highly motivated students. It is grounded in the traditions of the liberal arts and stresses the connections among various disciplines and the tools of artistic and intellectual creativity.  The Honors Program is an enrichment program for academically talented and highly motivated students designed to augment and complement a student's program of study.

Admission Process:

  1. An Honors Program application, which is separate from and in addition to the application for admission to the college. Download the application, or call: 
    • Ammerman Campus, (631) 451-4391
    • Eastern Campus, (631) 548-2679
    • Michael J. Grant Campus, (631) 851-6833
  2. A letter of recommendation from a person familiar with the applicant's academic performance or potential. In particular the letter should address the candidate's verbal skills, intellectual ability, and academic motivation.
  3. An essay of approximately 500 words that gives a perspective on the applicant both as a student and a person. The topic is open, but it should reflect the applicant’s best writing ability.
  4. For applicants from high school only, a copy of the student's high school and any previous college transcript(s) and ACT or SAT scores.
  5. New and continuing students may apply for admission to the Honors Program. Part-time and full-time students in all curricula are welcome to apply.

Minimum Requirements:

For entering students:

  • 85 un-weighted average in high school
  • composite SAT score of 1180 or ACT Score of 24

For students already enrolled at Suffolk:

  • 3.3 cumulative grade point average

In all instances, alternative evidence of academic ability may also be considered.

Diploma Sequence

Qualified students may enroll in the Honors Program Diploma Sequence while engaged in a curriculum of their choice. A minimum of 22 credits distributed throughout the social sciences, humanities, mathematics and sciences satisfies the diverse requirements for this sequence. Honors enhanced course requirements are met by substituting Honors-level sections for regular courses. Graduates who complete the Honors Program Diploma Sequence will have that distinction noted on their official academic transcript and on their diploma.

Recognition Sequence

Alternatively, qualified students may enroll in the Honors Program Recognition Sequence as part of their chosen curriculum. The Recognition Sequence is accomplished by successfully completing a minimum of twelve credits of honors courses. Graduates who complete the Honors Program Recognition Sequence will have that distinction noted on their official academic transcript and on their diploma.

Individual Honors Courses

Individual honors courses are open to qualified students on a space-available basis. Interested students should contact their campus Honors Coordinator.

Graduation Requirements

Students enrolled in the Honors Program must maintain a GPA of at least 3.3 each semester to remain in and graduate from the Honors Program.

Study Abroad Program

The Study Abroad Program allows students to receive an immersive educational experience in their subjects of choice abroad, meet their peers from other countries, experience different cultural contexts, languages and traditions, and learn how to adapt to them. While studying in foreign countries, students also learn more about themselves, their home country and culture through the lens of the global community, and acquire intercultural competencies for future employment in the global workforce.

SUNY Study Abroad Consortium offers 1000+ Study Abroad programs to Suffolk County Community College students. Of those, Study Abroad programs in Spain, Peru, Romania, Denmark and Ireland are led by Suffolk County Community College faculty and enroll annually or bi-annually the most curious and forward-thinking students at Suffolk.

Mission

A Study Abroad offers curricula-based credit-bearing opportunities to Suffolk and SUNY students interested in becoming global learners. The Study Abroad Program offerings focus on teaching students how to engage with local and global communities, provide opportunities to develop critical thinking skills, and foster personal and academic growth through disciplinary scholarship, language training, and cultural immersion.

For any questions, please contact:
Study Abroad Office
(631) 451-4430
studyabroad@sunysuffolk.edu

Applied Learning

Students have the opportunity to incorporate classroom and applied learning into their degree programs through a variety of methods. Many programs require experiential learning experiences as integral to the degree and other programs provide optional credit-bearing opportunities. The College is committed to experiences that are structured, begin with appropriate orientation and training, are monitored, and include learner reflection, activity assessment and evaluation.

Among the applied learning experiences are practicums in clinical settings; internships in local businesses or agencies; cooperative work experiences; field study; student-faculty research; study abroad; service learning; and opportunities to engage in independent creative expression. Types of experiences and the number offered vary by degree program. The purpose is to ensure that there is integration between classroom theory and practical experience. Often these experiences include a seminar or capstone class which helps students to make that important connection between theory and practice. Through experiential course offerings students can explore a career and prepare for future employment or advanced studies.

Many applied learning experiences have entrance requirements, involve the purchase of student liability insurance, and may have limited enrollment. All interested students are encouraged to contact their academic department or campus career office and they will be assisted or referred as appropriate. In programs where an applied learning experience is required to complete the curriculum, it is recommended that students begin the application process prior to registration. Applied learning opportunities may be offered within several programs including Liberal Arts and Sciences: General Studies.

For additional details go to the College website, email Internships@sunysuffolk.edu or call any of the Career Services Offices: Ammerman Campus: (631) 451-4049, Michael J. Grant Campus: (631) 851-6876 or Eastern Campus: (631) 548-2572.

In addition to those credit-bearing experiences, the College provides many applied learning opportunities that do not involve the awarding of academic credit. Students should consult the Student Life section of this catalog for some of these offerings. Lastly, each campus can provide guidance to students on the scores of opportunities related to community service and engagement, creative expression, leadership development, and campus employment.

STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

Suffolk County Community College has a robust model for serving students at all levels in STEM with federal grants that comprise our National Science Foundation (NSF) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) portfolio. Taken together, these federal grant programs provide entry points, scholarships, mentoring opportunities and research internships at all junctures of a student’s journey in STEM.  Explore the site to learn more about the exciting and transformational opportunities via these grant programs to get your start in STEM at Suffolk.

Automotive Technology

Fiat Chrysler – MOPAR Career Automotive Program (MCAP)

The Mopar® Career Automotive Program (MCAP) provides students the benefit of learning the latest FCA US LLC diagnostic technologies and service information which can immediately be applied through opportunities to work at a Chrysler, Jeep®, Dodge, Ram and FIAT® dealers. This industry-leading training puts MCAP grads in higher demand than technicians with a generic certificate or degree, which could mean higher job-placement and earning potential.

Learn more at mopar.com/en-us/mopar-cap.html


Ford ACE

Ford Automotive Career Exploration is a partnership program between Ford Motor Company, Ford/Lincoln dealerships, and secondary and post-secondary educational intuitions. The intent of the program is to raise awareness and increase interest in career opportunities within the automotive industry, ultimately as a service technician.

Students attending a Ford ACE partnership school can obtain valuable knowledge of Ford/Lincoln vehicle systems by completing Web-Based Training (WBT) via our Learning Management System (LMS). These courses are a subset of the same courses taken by our current dealership technicians. By completing these WBT courses, the students are one step closer towards a career in the automotive industry, beginning as an entry level automotive service technician at a Ford/Lincoln dealership

Learn more at  newfordtech.com


General Motors Automotive Service Educational Program (ASEP)

The GM ASEP training program combines academic coursework with exciting state of the art automotive service training.  Real world internship experiences give students the best possible preparation for automotive careers with GM products. 

The program teaches exclusively on current GM products and incorporates advanced automotive technical training with a strong academic foundation of math, reading, and electronics. 

Students in the program will alternate between the classroom and hands on work experience at sponsoring GM dealerships.  This unique combination of both analytical and technical skills results in a solid education combined with invaluable work experience.

Learn more at GMASEP.org


Honda Professional Automotive Career Training (PACT)

The Professional Automotive Career Training (PACT) program promotes lifelong learning by providing the right training for the right people at the right time for Honda dealerships. The purpose of this program is to prepare students for entry-level employment as a Honda or Acura automotive technician. PACT provides the factory certification and education needed to begin or advance your automotive career. PACT students earn certifications that qualify them to work and earn money in an entry-level position, these positions such as Express-Level Tech or Express Service Advisor are the building blocks of the dealer service department. Our program reflects this building-block approach and includes theory, diagnosis, repair and maintenance of late model Honda and Acura vehicles with complex advance electronic systems. Emphasis is also placed on operational theory, practical skills and accepted shop procedures.

Learn more at HondaPact.com


Nissan Technician Training Academy – Infiniti

NISSAN Technician Training Academy (NTTA) prepares students for a career as a factory-trained technicians at NISSAN and INFINITI dealerships nationwide. Students gain hands-on automotive diagnosis and repair experience, qualifying them to step into one of the estimated additional 6,000 technician jobs NISSAN and INFINITI dealerships expect to offer over the next 5 years.

NTTA Program benefits include factory-specific training, NISSAN & ASE certification and apprenticeship Opportunities.

A highlight of the NTTA program is the Tuition Reimbursement Incentive Program (TRIP) which will allow a student to receive up to half of their tuition cost if employed by an Infiniti or Nissan Dealer for two years.

Learn more at nissantechacademy.com


Subaru University

Subaru-U is designed to create a unique partnership between Subaru of America, the retailer, and high performing post-secondary institutions. By infusing Subaru's Web-Based Training (WBT) into the existing curriculum, students have the ability to take most of the entry-level training that is required of all Subaru technicians. Students can even opt to take a Subaru Level 2 Instructor Led Training Test-out and advance their training even further. Students at participating Subaru-U partner schools can gain valuable knowledge of Subaru vehicle systems that can better prepare them for possible employment in any one of approximately 600 Subaru retailers nationwide.

Learn more at subaru-u.com


Tesla START

Tesla START is an intensive training program designed to provide students across North America with the skills necessary for a successful career with Tesla—at the forefront of the electric vehicle revolution. During the program, students will develop technical expertise and earn certifications through a blended approach of in-class theory, hands-on labs and self-paced learning.

Learn more at tesla.com/careers/tesla-start


Toyota Technical Education Network (T-TEN)

T-TEN is a world-renowned technical training program partnership with Toyota.  With its proven record of placing thousands of Toyota and Lexus certified technicians in well-paid dealership positions, the program assists aspiring technicians to get the training they need to qualify for interesting and rewarding careers.

Together, Suffolk Community College and T-TEN provide state-of-the-art automotive training in both classroom and workshop settings. T-TEN students learn and earn in a supportive environment while receiving instruction from factory-trained teachers and guidance from dealership mentors, graduating from the program with the confidence, skills, and certifications needed to launch a challenging and profitable career. 

Learn more at web.tten.aws.toyota.com/usa/tten


BMW

Students who complete their A.A.S. at Suffolk and have an interest in gaining BMW factory training may apply to BMW STEP. The BMW Service Technician Education Program (STEP) is a specialty program that provides students with hands-on technical training and prepares them for an exciting career with BMW. The application process is open to graduates of post-secondary automotive schools who will further their knowledge working on the some of the most advanced and luxurious vehicles in the world. Whether a student wants to specialize in BMW vehicles, MINI, motorcycles, or body and paint, STEP provides an opportunity for everyone.

Learn more at bmwstep.com


ASE Education Foundation

The ASE Education Foundation is a non-profit organization that evaluates and accredits entry-level automotive technology education programs against standards developed by the automotive service industry. It also develops career-readiness education for students which fuse local partnerships, rigorous standard-based education, workplace experience, and mentorship together.

The mission of the foundation is to improve the quality of automotive technician training programs nationwide at secondary and post-secondary, public and proprietary schools. To accomplish this mission ASE examines the structure, resources and quality of training programs and evaluates them against standards established by the industry.  These standards reflect the skills that students must master to be successful in the industry.

The automotive service and repair industry have changed tremendously in the last decade.  Working on today’s cars requires a deeper understanding of the technology that goes into the modern, more sophisticated automobile.  This increased sophistication means schools need to stay current to properly educate students to meet industry standards.  That is why accreditation for automotive programs is so important.

Suffolk County Community College automotive training programs have earned ASE Education Foundation accreditation.  This ensures our training meets the highest standards, bringing credibility, prestige, and industry recognition to our top-notch programs. 

Learn more at aseeducationfoundation.org


The National Coalition of Certification Centers (NC3)

NC3 was established to help build a workforce prepared to meet the needs of today’s and tomorrow’s industries by connecting employers and educational institutions in synergistic partnerships that foster effective training, elevation of skilled careers, and employment opportunities. In fulfilling its mission, NC3 builds deep industry-educational partnerships and develops, implements and sustains industry-recognized portable certifications built on national skills standards. We envision an industrial labor market where all workers have jobs they need to thrive and all companies have well-trained employees they need to operate and grow. Through NC3 partnership, Suffolk is able to grant industry certifications through industry partners such as Snap-On Tools.

Learn more at nc3.net


Snap-On Tools Student Educational Program

The Student Education Program (SEP) program offers technical students the opportunity to purchase professional quality Snap-on tools at a discount. Students get the TOOLS FOR LIFE they need for classroom training, and they can carry those same tools into their professional careers.

All full-time students enrolled in a Suffolk Automotive program and currently fulfilling their curriculum requirements are eligible for the Student Excellence Program.

All of the tool sets, hand tools, torque tools, diagnostics and tool storage found in the SEP catalog are available at student pricing.

While enrolled, a full-time student may purchase up to $11,000 worth of tools (at list price value) and may also purchase one roll cart or roll cab, and one top chest.

Learn more at snapon.com/Industrial-Education


Hunter Engineering

Hunter Engineering is the leading manufacturer of under-car service equipment including wheel alignment, tire and wheel service equipment. Suffolk’s partnership with Hunter allows students to earn Hunter Engineering certification. Suffolk is the home of Hunter’s regional training center which provides working service technicians the opportunity to continue their education at Suffolk through Hunter.

Learn more at hunter.com

BioPREP

BioPREP

BioPREP (Biology Participation in Research and Education Program) is a highly prestigious and very competitive program developed by the National Institute of Health to encourage underrepresented students at two-year institutions who want to transfer to four-year schools and prepare for careers in the biological sciences. At Suffolk, the program involves a full scholarship for those qualifying students who wish to participate in Stony Brook BioPREP's summer program, a 6-week summer program where students perform research and study molecular and cell biology. For further information, contact Rosa M. Gambier, Academic Chair of the Biology Department at the Ammerman Campus.

Corporate Training

The Mission of the Corporate Training Center at Suffolk County Community College is to provide companies with cost effective training solutions that support their goals and objectives, fosters employee potential and growth and improves the overall well-being of their business.

Success and growth in today's economy are dependent on an organizations ability to attract, hire and retain a highly skilled, motivated and flexible workforce. The Corporate Training Center partners with local business and industry to provide workforce training and development solutions, tailored to meet organizational goals. We work with client companies of all sizes to assess learning needs, discuss training options and determine the best training solutions to achieve their business objectives.

The College’s Corporate Training Center, located in the Sally Ann Slacke building on the Michael J. Grant Campus in Brentwood, offers a broad array of workforce and professional development training programs designed to meet the needs of the region's business and industry sectors. The courses offered range from soft skill programs, such as Customer Service Excellence, Supervisory Skills, and Business Writing through computer skill courses in Microsoft™ Office applications as well as other specialized software. These courses are designed to upgrade and improve the performance of current employees, while adding value to a company by improving their efficiency. The Corporate Training Center also offers special seminars and conferences focused on relevant topics of importance to the business community. Companies can benefit from doing business with the Corporate Training Center, in that they offer flexible delivery options and schedules as well as provide training programs tailored to a company’s specific needs. Businesses from many different market segments have participated in these cost-effective programs, including manufacturing, health care, communications and retail among many. More than 400 companies have received training through the Corporate Training Center at Suffolk County Community College through both contract training and grant-funded programs.

Customization

In addition to offering a number of cutting edge programs designed to keep pace with the rapidly changing technological and training needs of business and industry, the Corporate Training Center provides the ability for upfront consultation, which assures that course offerings will meet the unique needs of a specific company. This personalized approach assures satisfaction and tangible results for companies participating in their programs. In response to the needs of Long Island companies, the Corporate Training Center has met the challenge of providing cost effective, quality training through contract and grant-funded training programs.

Examples of such programs follow:

  • Computer Applications: training in areas such as Microsoft™ Office, including Word, Access, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint as well as other software programs such as AutoCAD, MS Project and Publisher.
  • Business Training: through contracts and grants, businesses can take advantage of a wide range of training courses to help improve their operations. Customer Service, Communications, Leadership, Time Management and Business Writing are only a few of the many courses offered.
  • Professional Development: owners of businesses have utilized the Corporate Training Center's services to improve the managerial and supervisory skills of their staff. It has also aided businesses in defining specific training programs for their employees and management personnel.
  • Specialized and Customized Skills Training: training courses may be customized based on client requirements. This customization allows for a more focused approach to training designed to address the unique needs, issues or problems faced by a company in today's business environment.

Apprenticeship Program

A Solution to Meeting Growing Workforce Needs

To meet the growing need for a skilled workforce, New York State has provided funding for community colleges to develop one of the largest statewide public/private partnership apprenticeship programs in the country. The SUNY Apprenticeship Program will assist in developing Registered Apprenticeships in Advanced Manufacturing, Cybersecurity, Artificial Intelligence and other high-needs fields.

As an approved apprenticeship related-instruction (RI) provider, Suffolk County Community College’s Advanced Manufacturing Training Center is ready to support trade titles with related instruction in Advanced Manufacturing for the following trades:

  • CNC Machinist
  • Electro Mechanical Technician
  • Industrial Manufacturing Technician
  • Maintenance Mechanic (Automation Equipment)
  • Quality Assurance Auditor

The Apprenticeship Program is an employer-driven program through the New York State Department of Labor (NYSDOL), where companies may be eligible to get a related-instruction portion of an apprenticeship covered.

To find out more about related-instruction training, becoming a sponsor, or if you are interested in being part of our roundtable discussion, contact Suffolk County Community College's Advanced Manufacturing Training Center at 631-851-6200.

"Apprenticeship programs offer students the educational opportunities and hands-on experience they need to prepare them for the jobs of the future," Governor Cuomo said. See Press Release for more information.

Advanced Manufacturing Training

The Advanced Manufacturing Training Center offers many training opportunities to develop and upgrade skills necessary to begin a career in the manufacturing field.

The Center offers several programs such as CNC Operator, Welding, IPC certification, PLC/Industrial Automation, Mastercam, and Soldering and electronic assembly, among others. Each program offers a Completion Certificate upon successful completion, and offers the opportunity of National Certification in some areas. These courses are designed for the incumbent worker as well as those individuals interested in entering the manufacturing field. The AMTC provides students with a better understanding of what is required of those working in the manufacturing environment through both classroom and hands-on learning. Our location is a Certified Remote Testing Facility and provides associated testing in IPC, AWS, NATE, Certiport, and NIMS Certifications. Training is located at the Michael J. Grant Campus of Suffolk County Community College.

For more information and schedules, call (631) 851-6200, email advmfg@sunysuffolk.edu or visit the website www.sunysuffolk.edu/advancedmanufacturing

Workforce Technology Career Pathways - This career can be yours, view the youtube video Workforce Development/Advanced Manufacturing

Business Outsourcing Opportunity

The Advanced Manufacturing Training Center also offers customized and onsite training. Call 631-851-6200 for details.

Entrepreneurial Assistance Center

Take Your Business to the Next Level

COVID-19 Loan Programs

 

The Entrepreneurial Assistance Program (EAP)

EAP is a 60-hour training program created to assist entrepreneurs with starting and/or expanding their businesses.

Next course starts October 5, 2020.

Click here to Register

 

COVID-19 Webinar Series 

Webinars designed to assist business owners recover from the business impacts of COVID-19.

 

Programa de Asistencia Empresarial

EAP en español es un programa de entrenamiento de 60 horas que ayuda a personas a crear su propia empresa y/o asistir a aquellos propietarios que deseen ampliar su negocio o empresa.

 

Youth Entrepreneurial Summer Camp Program

The Youth Entrepreneurial Summer Camp is an intensive two-week camp created to teach youths, age 13-16, entrepreneurial skills and financial literacy.

Grant-Funded Training Programs

The Corporate Training Center at Suffolk County Community College has worked with companies to help secure training grants from federal, state and county agencies. Many grants provide a level of funding for specific training programs with matching funds required from the company participating in the grant. The company is also responsible for meeting specific eligibility guidelines of the grant awarded. This arrangement provides an opportunity to upgrade workforce skills at an affordable cost to the company. The Corporate Training Center has secured specific grants in the area of Advanced Manufacturing, Workplace English, among other programs, for incumbent workers. These programs have allowed the training of displaced workers, economically disadvantaged adults, persons with disabilities and veterans to receive vocational training. Many of these students have successfully completed their training, obtained full- or part-time employment and have become self-sufficient, productive members of the community. These programs also allow many to further their education and obtain degrees at SCCC in Manufacturing Technology and other fields or obtain four–year degrees at other institutions. In addition, this training has helped businesses and enabled companies to be more competitive in the global marketplace. It has allowed firms to upgrade the skills of their incumbent workers, increase retention rates, and remain an economic resource for Long Island.

Continuing Education


If you are interested in registering for summer 2020 Continuing Education (CE) courses,

please email rileyk@sunysuffolk.edu  or dunkira@sunysuffolk.edu.  ​You may e-mail coleng@sunysuffolk.edu for TASC related questions. At present and until further notice, all CE courses are being/will be conducted in an online format due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  

Suffolk County Community College offers an extensive program of non-credit continuing education and professional development courses at each campus. Students may choose courses to improve academic skills, enhance business skills, change careers, satisfy continuing professional education requirements for licensed professions, or increase knowledge in a particular area.

 
If you are an organization, we can customize programs for you and deliver them at your location.
 
We invite you to explore all the exciting possibilities within Continuing Education!
 
Registration for Continuing Education Fall 2020 is open!
View Continuing Education Course Catalog (Fall 2020)
 

Mission

The Office for Continuing Education provides lifelong learning opportunities for the community at-large at accessible locations and times.  Theses short-term offerings include remedial courses, programs for career changers, personal and cultural enrichment and professional development.

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Programs for College Students

The Office for Continuing Education offers a wide variety of College Course Review classes and Special Programs for college students.

  • GRE Prep Course
  • Chemistry Review For Biology Students
  • Preparation For Introductory Science Courses
  • Math Review For Introductory Science Courses

Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program (CSTEP)

The Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program (CSTEP) at Suffolk County Community College provides academic support services to underrepresented and economically disadvantaged students pursuing careers in mathematics, science, technology, health-related fields, and the licensed professions. CSTEP is funded by the New York State Education Department.

Learn more about CSTEP.

Science Education Opportunities

United States Department of Energy Office of Science Education Opportunities

Community College Institute (CCI) - The Summer Institute for Community Colleges is designed to provide educational training and research experience during ten weeks in the summer at a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory for highly motivated community college students.

Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program (CSTEP) Mini-Course - The Mini-Course offers New York State CSTEP students an opportunity to participate in a four day introductory mini-course in Bioinformatics to be held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during the school winter break. CSTEP also partners with BNL for an educational training and research experience during the summer, similar to the CCI program described above.

K-12 Programs (STEP and LPP)

Science and Technology Entry Program (STEP)

Science and Technology Entry Program (STEP) at Suffolk County Community College is offered to students in 7th through 12th grades in selected school districts.

STEP is designed to motivate and prepare financially disadvantaged and underrepresented minority students for careers in science, technology and mathematics-related disciplines, along with licensed professions such as nursing and accountancy.

Learn more about STEP.

Liberty Partnerships Program (LPP)

The Liberty Partnerships Program (LPP) at Suffolk County Community College represents a cooperative effort between the College, the Longwood Central School District, governmental agencies and business and industry to provide a unique, comprehensive and supportive environment for students who may be at risk of dropping out of school. Its purpose is to serve those students who may not be reaching their academic potential by providing academic services that will improve their ability to complete high school and successfully enter postsecondary education or the workforce. LPP is funded by a grant from the New York State Education Department.

Learn more about LPP.

Driver and Traffic Safety Education Course

Suffolk County Community College offers high school students its highly regarded New York State-Certified Driver and Traffic Safety Education Course. 

  • Drivers Education provides the required classroom and in-car instruction to prepare 16 and 17 year-olds for their license exam.
  • The Fall and Spring programs are 17 weeks in length in which the student will come to campus once a week.
  • The Summer program is 7-8 weeks in length in which the student will come to campus 3 times a week.

Learn more about Drivers Education.

If you have any questions, contact the Office for Continuing Education by email at santiaju@sunysuffolk.edu or by phone at (631) 451-4399.

Curricula

Degree Types

Suffolk County Community College offers a variety of two-year curricula leading to the associate degree as well as several certificate programs. There are three different associate degrees, each having a specific purpose and differing credit distributions.

Associate in Arts (A.A.) Degree

This is a liberal arts-based degree for which the objective is preparation for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program, generally in a liberal arts major (i.e., English, history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, etc.).

Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree

This is a liberal arts and science-based degree for which the objective is preparation for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program, generally in a professional field of endeavor (i.e., chemistry, engineering, computer science, etc.).

Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree

This is an occupationally-based degree for which the primary objective is preparation for job entry immediately upon completion of the degree program (i.e., occupational therapy assistant, paralegal, etc.). While the emphasis is on providing particular occupational skills, each curriculum includes courses in the humanities, social sciences and mathematics.

Some graduates of these programs may also transfer to four-year colleges. The acceptance of courses for transfer are subject to the discretion of the receiving baccalaureate institution.

Certificate Programs

A certificate may include some liberal arts courses, but are designed to provide students with practical knowledge and skills that lead to employment. Certificates vary in length but can generally be completed in one calendar year. Many of the certificate programs can be used as the first stage in an educational program leading eventually to an associate or bachelor's degree.

Online and Evening Programs

Online Education Programs

Fully online programs provide opportunities for students to complete all course requirements without needing to attend any classes on campus. Course requirements and content for online degrees are equivalent to the College’s requirements for traditional campus-based (i.e., face-to-face) curricula.

Evening Courses

Half the College’s student body is comprised of students enrolled in classes scheduled during the late afternoons and evenings, Monday through Friday, and in weekend course offerings. Most evening students are enrolled in one of the degree or certificate programs, but some students simply take a few courses to meet specific job requirements, prepare for advancement to better positions, promote self-development, or broaden their understanding of contemporary cultural and social phenomena.

Evening and weekend classes are offered on all three campuses. These courses are identical in content to those offered during the day session. Unless otherwise noted, all academic and administrative guidelines and regulations which pertain to full-time students also apply to part-time students. Students have access to the complete classroom, laboratory and library facilities of the campuses and are provided with academic advisement, counseling and other services.

Individuals who plan to work toward a degree or certificate should apply as a matriculated student through the Admissions Office. Those interested in taking credit courses for personal or vocational enrichment and not pursuing a degree or certificate, should contact the Campus Registrar's Office. For those interested in taking non-credit courses, please see Continuing Education.

Insufficient enrollment in a course or program, or in a given semester, may make it necessary for students to enroll in a day class, at another campus, or to attend extra semesters in order to complete specific required courses. Please consult with the campus Office of Academic Affairs on any campus for further information.

Visit Class Schedule for course availability.

Summer Sessions and Wintersession

The College operates summer sessions at all three campuses. This may consist of two consecutive five-week day and evening sessions, as well as an overlapping eight-week session for selected courses. Nine to 12 credits may be completed by enrolling in a combination of these sessions. Any matriculated student wishing to enroll for more than 12 credits must receive permission from the campus Academic Dean.

A three-week wintersession offering only day classes is scheduled each year in late December and January before the spring semester begins. Three to four credits may be completed during the wintersession.

In addition to the College’s own students, the summer sessions and the wintersession are popular with students visiting from other colleges and universities who wish either to make up or accelerate coursework in their own programs. Students not admitted into a degree or certificate program at Suffolk County Community College are considered non-matriculated and can only register for 1-11.5 credits. Visiting students need to refer to the Non-Degree Seeking Student Application.

Visit Class Schedule for course availability.

Duration of Study

Students can complete the A.A., A.S. or the A.A.S. degree in two years of successful full-time study, while most certificate programs are designed for one year of full-time study. Students working toward the degree or certificate on a part-time or minimum full-time basis should understand that completion of the program will take longer. Placement into developmental courses may also extend duration of study.

Increasingly, students find it difficult to complete the major in the suggested time because of family obligations, work hours or other responsibilities. The College understands these circumstances and encourages students to consult with the College’s counselors or academic departments for assistance in determining the optimum course load and time frame for pursuing their program of study.

Unless otherwise stated, there is no academic penalty for taking longer than the one or two years outlined in the curricula that follow. Some students find that attending the summer sessions and/or the wintersession provides an opportunity to expedite their progress in their program of study.

Curricula Descriptions and Requirements

State University of New York General Education Requirement (SUNY-GER)

All students enrolled in programs leading to A.A., A.S., and baccalaureate degrees are required by the State University of New York to complete 30 credits of SUNY-GER General Education in a minimum of seven of 10 areas. Students must take at least one course each in both Mathematics and Basic Communication and in five of the following eight areas:

      1. Natural Sciences
      2. Social Sciences
      3. American History
      4. Western Civilization
      5. Other World Civilization
      6. Humanities
      7. The Arts
      8. Foreign Language

Students who are planning to transfer to SUNY baccalaureate programs are strongly encouraged to take three of the five courses in Natural Science, Social Science, and the Humanities, as these areas are required in nearly all bachelor’s degree programs.

In addition to the seven of 10 course requirements, students must also demonstrate the following competencies, which are infused throughout the General Education program:

      1. Critical Thinking (Reasoning)
      2. Information Management

Note: Visit SUNY General Education listing or course descriptions to determine which Suffolk County Community College courses fulfill the SUNY General Education Requirements

SUNY Transfer Paths

The State University of New York (SUNY) has implemented the Seamless Transfer Initiative to assist students, who have obtained an A.A. or A.S. degree at Suffolk County Community College, to transfer to a SUNY four-year institution with junior status. Seamless transfer is achieved by completing seven of the 10 SUNY General Education Requirements and passing the required Transfer Path courses within the intended major with a minimum of a “C.”

Transfer Paths include lower division course requirements that are common to all SUNY campuses with the similar major. Transfer Paths exist for many degrees at Suffolk County Community College. Visit SUNY Transfer Paths to determine the courses that should be completed before transferring to the SUNY four-year institution.

Core Education Graduation Requirement

As a condition of graduation, students in all Suffolk County Community College degree programs must satisfy core education requirements.

Students in A.A. degree programs must satisfy the following minimum requirements:

ENG101: Standard Freshman Composition - 3 credits
ENG102: Introduction to Literature - 3 credits
Humanities Electives (only one course may be English) - 9 credits
Social Science Electives - 6 credits
History Elective - 3 credits
Mathematics Elective - 3-4 credits
Laboratory Science Elective - 4 credits
Physical Education Electives - 2 credits
College Seminar - 1 credit
34-35 credits

Students in A.S. degree programs must satisfy the following minimum requirements:

ENG101: Standard Freshman Composition - 3 credits
English Elective - 3 credits
Humanities Elective (other than English) - 3 credits
History Elective - 3 credits
Social Science Elective (other than History) - 3 credits
Mathematics Elective - 3-4 credits
Laboratory Science Elective - 4 credits
Physical Education Elective - 1-2 credits
College Seminar - 1 credit
24-26 credits

Students in A.A.S. degree programs must satisfy the following minimum requirements:

ENG101: Standard Freshman Composition - 3 credits
English Elective - 3 credits
Humanities Elective (other than English) - 3 credits
Social Science Elective - 3 credits
Mathematics Elective - 3-4 credits
Laboratory Science Elective - 4 credits
Physical Education Elective - 1-2 credits
College Seminar - 1 credit
21-23 credits

* Currently, some programs exist with exceptions to one or more of these requirements.

Minimum Credits and GPA for Graduation

In order to graduate from any curriculum, students must complete a minimum of 60 credits for a degree and complete all curriculum requirements for a certificate while attaining a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0, both cumulatively and in their major courses. The courses constituting the major in each curriculum are designated with a ♦ symbol. Only the Liberal Arts and Sciences: Adolescence Education programs, the Liberal Arts and Sciences: Education (Child Study) and the Liberal Arts and Sciences: General Studies curricula do not designate major courses.

Two 2-credit courses may be used to fulfill a 3-credit unrestricted elective. All of the credits required for an unrestricted elective must be satisfied.

Program Requirements

Academic program requirements are subject to change. Students, enrolled in a program that has been revised, have the option to follow the program requirements in place when they were accepted into the program or they can opt to switch into the new program requirements. For further information regarding any curriculum, students should seek advice from the academic counselors, the Admissions Office, or the academic departments on any of the three campuses.

Majors and Programs

Getting the latest
Getting the latest

Courses

Course Guidelines

All course descriptions and learning outcomes are discipline-specific and must be followed.

Each course description includes one or more of these designations: A, E, G. The letters indicate whether the course can be of‍fered on or by the Ammerman (A), Eastern (E) and Michael J. Grant (G) campuses, respectively.

Many courses are offered both day and evening every semester. However, certain courses are offered only in the day (or only in the eve­ning), and some courses are not offered each semester. As course offerings are subject to change, please consult the class schedule available online, for a complete listing of all courses to be of‍fered in a particular fall, wintersession, spring or summer term for each campus.

Generally, courses meet one clock hour each week during the semester for every credit hour stipulated in the course description. Thus, a “3 cr. hr.” course meets three hours each week during a 15-week semester. However, two or three hours (or more) of laboratory, studio or other learning activities will count the same as one hour of lecture. Students should under­stand that one hour in class normally requires two hours of preparation, reading or outside work. Thus, a full-time student enrolled for 15 credits should be prepared to devote as much as 30 hours to out-of-class learning activities, in addition to time spent in the classroom.

Certain courses have prerequisites, and the College expects students to have successfully completed all prerequisites before registering for such courses. It is the student’s responsibil­ity to make sure that all course prerequisites are completed before registering for a course. Ques­tions concerning course prerequisites should be directed to an appropriate academic chairper­son, counselor, or academic dean. The College re­serves the right to prohibit a student from attending a class when it feels the course prerequisite(s) have not been met.

Depending upon their curriculum, students may have considerable freedom to choose courses according to their interests. However, enrollment in certain courses is restricted to students matriculated in particular programs (e.g., only nursing students may enroll in NUR courses). In some other courses, enrollment priority is given to students matriculated in particular programs, but if room is available, other students may be admitted (e.g., students in the health careers programs have priority in the HSC101 course, but others may take it as an elective if space is available).

Course descriptions are grouped according to subject or discipline, which are arranged alphabetically.

Some curriculum outlines, in addition to designating specif‍ic courses which must be completed, stipulate a “Humanities Elective,” “Social Sciences Elective,” “Science or Math­ematics Elective,” “Business Elective,” etc. In the list which follows, subjects or disciplines are grouped into these broad areas. A “Liberal Arts and Sciences Elec­tive” includes most courses in any subject area under the humanities, social sciences, science or mathematics areas, and some computer science courses.

Guidelines for Employment and Credit Limits

While the College recognizes that most stu­dents must work at least part-time in order to meet their expenses during the academic year, studies have indicated that students’ grades fall off significantly if they must work more than 20 hours per week while taking 12 credits or more in any given semester.

Online Education

Welcome to Online Education at Suffolk

These pages include information for prospective students that are interested in taking online or blended courses at the College or those who have instructors that are using the college's Learning Management System (LMS) Blackboard Learn to supplement their face-to-face instruction.

Faculty who are interested in learning more about Blackboard or getting certified to teach online should visit our Online Faculty site.

What is Suffolk Online?
Suffolk Online refers to the online Learning Management System, Blackboard Learn. Through this online platform, instructors provide learning materials, create various learning activities, collect student work, and conduct assessments.
What is online education?

At Suffolk, online education refers to the online Learning Management System (LMS) Blackboard Learn, and may include any online materials that instructors provide for their students to fully participate in a course. For example, a traditional lecture style course may require students to do homework online.

Online education is an attractive option for individuals who are self-motivated and can work independently. There is no difference in what you are expected to learn; it is the modality that is different.

What are the different types of online education courses?
  1. Fully Online – These courses are offered entirely online using  Blackboard Learn. Learning, participation in discussions, assignments and most exams are completed online. Please note, students taking fully online courses may still need to come to campus for some student services or proctored exams.
    • FAQs about online courses at Suffolk
      • Can I work at my own pace? No. Online courses follow the academic calendar and have due dates for assignments, discussions and exams.
      • When can I register for online courses? Students can register during the same times as for traditional courses. The College does not have open enrollment or Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).
      • Are online courses easier? No. Online courses are just as difficult as on-campus courses, and may even be more challenging due to the learning modality of the course.

  2. Blended/Hybrid – These courses offer a combination of both classroom and independent online learning. The Blackboard Learn system is utilized for learning activities, participation in discussions, and coursework in addition to classroom participation. Students are expected to complete both the in-person classroom and independent online components of the class for successful completion of the course.

  3. Web Enabled – These are traditional, on-campus courses for which instructors provide additional online study materials in Blackboard Learn. All Suffolk courses have the ability to be web enabled.

  4. Computer Instruction on Campus - These are traditional, on-campus courses with computer lab-enhanced instruction. Along with the computerized instruction, instructors may provide additional online study materials for their students in the Blackboard Learn system. The entire course or a section of the course may be taught through a computer program with instructor guidance. These courses meet in one of the computer lab classrooms and the program is accessed via Blackboard Learn.
Who should enroll in fully online or blended/hybrid courses?

Students should enroll in fully online or blended courses only if they are serious about and capable of more independent, computerized learning and timely completion of college-level coursework. In a fully online or blended/hybrid course, students will participate in lessons, complete assignments (e.g., essay exams, research papers, etc.) and take online assessments.

To enroll in an online course, students should have successfully completed any requisite developmental coursework.

Those who are apt to succeed as online learners:

  • Are highly motivated
  • Are independent
  • Are active learners
  • Have good reading and writing skills
  • Have good organizational and time management skills
  • Have the discipline to study without external reminders
  • Can adapt to new learning environments
  • Have access to a computer

Success in fully online and blended/hybrid courses require a combination of personal motivation, the ability to use computer technology, self-direction in completing coursework on time, and the reading and writing skills to communicate with both the instructor and classmates.

Proceed to "Is Online Learning Right for Me?" to assess your potential for online learning success.

What is Online Education Concierge Service?

Students who cannot find answers to their online education questions on Suffolk’s website are welcome to call Suffolk’s Online Education Concierge Service at (631) 451-4804.  Questions will either be personally answered or students will be directed to the appropriate Suffolk County Community College Office to acquire the information.  If not immediate, response time to inquiries are anticipated to be within one day.

Suffolk's Online Education Concierge Service Hours:

Tuesday and Wednesday: 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Thursday and Friday: 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. 

Use of Online Exam Proctoring

Some courses or programs at the College may require students to use online exam proctoring and security tool(s) for online/remote exams. At this time, these online exam proctoring and security tools include Respondus LockDown Browser and Monitor, which are available to faculty for remote exams generally, and Proctorio, which is currently used only in specific program(s).

Respondus LockDown Browser and Monitor is a custom browser that locks down the testing environment within the Blackboard Learning Management System while also using a webcam feature. The webcam feature uses a student’s webcam and video analytics to deter cheating during remote exams. When this feature is enabled for an exam, students are required to use a webcam and microphone. After the exam is complete, an instructor may review details of the exam and the recorded video if warranted.

Proctorio is an online, remote proctoring tool that uses secure browser settings, computer lockdown, originality authentication, identity verification technology, automated proctoring, and analytics to ensure test integrity.

These services were selected and made available for use after a careful evaluation of their adherence to our computing and security requirements, academic/program requirements, privacy considerations, and the tools’ support for our commitment to academic integrity.

Students should refer to their course syllabi for any course-specific information and requirements. Further instructions on using online exam proctoring will be provided by the faculty member.

Independent Study

A student wishing to carry out a learning project that incorporates content and depth not available through regular course offerings may submit a proposal to do so through an independent study course. Application for independent study should be made in advance of the semester during which the course activi­ties will be carried out and must be made in consultation with a faculty member who will serve as instructor for the course. A proposal for independent study must include a rationale for the course, a statement of objectives to be achieved, and a description of activities to be carried out in order to achieve those objectives. Approval by the appropriate Associate Dean of Academic Affairs is required. Interested students are advised to consult the academic chair prior to preparing a proposal.

Independent study courses require, as a pre­requisite, matriculated status at Suffolk County Community College and six credit hours in the respective area of study with a grade of B or better.

All Independent Study courses are desig­nated 297 according to academic discipline. 

Academic Areas, Disciplines and Codes Chart

Business3

  • AccountingACC
  • Business AdministrationBUS
  • Business: MarketingMKT

Engineering Science and Technology8

  • Automotive TechnologyAUT
  • Construction TechnologyCOT
  • CybersecurityCYB
  • DraftingDRF
  • Electrical Engineering TechnologyELT
  • Engineering ScienceENS
  • Fire Protection TechnologyFPT
  • Toyota Automotive ServiceTYT

Humanities22

  • ChineseCHI
  • Cinema StudiesCIN
  • Communication StudiesCOM
  • DanceDNC
  • Digital ArtDIA
  • Digital Media and AnimationDMA
  • English/JournalismENG
  • FrenchFRE
  • GermanGER
  • Graphic DesignGRD
  • HumanitiesHUM
  • Interior DesignINT
  • ItalianITL
  • JapaneseJPN
  • LatinLAT
  • MusicMUS
  • Musical TheatreMTR
  • PhilosophyPHL
  • SpanishSPN
  • Theatre ArtsTHR
  • Visual Arts/PhotographyART
  • Women's and Gender StudiesWST

Nursing, Health and Physical Education13

  • Addiction StudiesADS
  • American Sign LanguageASL
  • Dietetic TechnicianDTE
  • Fitness SpecialistPFS
  • Health CareersHSC
  • Health Information Technology / Medical RecordsHIT
  • Human ServicesHUS
  • NursingNUR
  • Occupational Therapy AssistantOTA
  • ParamedicPAR
  • Physical EducationPED
  • Physical Therapy AssistantPTA
  • Practical Nursing (LPN)PNU

Science and Mathematics9

  • AstronomyAST
  • BiologyBIO
  • ChemistryCHE
  • Earth Science/GeologyESC
  • Environmental ScienceENV
  • Marine Biology/OceanographyMAR
  • MathematicsMAT
  • MeteorologyMET
  • PhysicsPHY

Social Sciences7

  • AnthropologyANT
  • EconomicsECO
  • GeographyGEO
  • HistoryHIS
  • Political SciencePOL
  • PsychologyPSY
  • SociologySOC

Special Areas16

  • College SeminarCOL
  • Computer ScienceCSE
  • Criminal JusticeCRJ
  • Culinary ArtsCUL
  • Education/Early ChildhoodEDU
  • English as a Second LanguageESL
  • Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration (HVAC/R)HVA
  • Hotel and Resort ManagementHRM
  • Information TechnologyCST
  • Interdisciplinary StudiesIND
  • Law/ParalegalLAW
  • Library ResearchLIB
  • Manufacturing TechnologyMFT
  • Radio/TV ProductionRTV
  • ReadingRDG
  • Veterinary Science TechnologyVST

SUNY General Education Requirements

State University of New York

General Education Requirement (SUNY-GER)

All students enrolled in programs leading to A.A., A.S., and baccalaureate degrees are required by the State University of New York to complete 30 credits of SUNY-GER general education in a minimum of seven of 10 areas. Students must take at least one course each in both Mathematics and Basic Communication and in five of the following eight areas:

  1. Natural Sciences
  2. Social Sciences
  3. American History
  4. Western Civilization
  5. Other World Civilizations
  6. Humanities
  7. The Arts
  8. Foreign Language

Students who are planning to transfer to SUNY baccalaureate programs are strongly encouraged to take three of the five courses in Natural Science, Social Science, and the Humanities, as these areas are required in nearly all bachelor’s degree programs.

In addition to the seven of 10 course requirement, students must also demonstrate the following competencies, which are infused throughout the General Education program:

  1. Critical Thinking (Reasoning)
  2. Information Management

See list below to determine which Suffolk County Community College courses fulfill the SUNY General Education requirements.

General Education Area

Approved SCCC Courses

Mathematics:

MAT101, MAT102, MAT103, MAT111, MAT116,
MAT121, MAT124, MAT125, MAT126, MAT131,
MAT141, MAT142, MAT200, MAT203, MAT204,
MAT205, MAT206, MAT210;
PSY225;

Natural Sciences:

AST101, AST102, AST103;
BIO101, BIO103, BIO105, BIO109, BIO111,
BIO121, BIO130, BIO132, BIO138, BIO150,
BIO151, BIO152, BIO210, BIO244, BIO246,
BIO262, BIO270, BIO272;
CHE100, CHE105, CHE120, CHE122, CHE133,
CHE134, CHE200, CHE250, CHE251;
ENV101;
ESC101, ESC102, ESC125;
MAR105, MAR111, MAR121;
MET101, MET102;
PHY101, PHY102, PHY112, PHY130, PHY132,
PHY230, PHY232, PHY245, PHY246;

Social Sciences:

ANT101, ANT103, ANT105, ANT203;
ECO101, ECO111, ECO112;
ENG177;
GEO101, GEO102, GEO103;
HIS101, HIS102, HIS103, HIS104, HIS107,
HIS110, HIS201, HIS220, HIS225;
HSC111;
HUS101;
POL101, POL103, POL105, POL107, POL109,
POL111;
PSY101, PSY105, PSY205, PSY212;
SOC101, SOC122, SOC200, SOC201, SOC224;

American History:

For all Students
HIS103, HIS104, HIS225;
POL105;


For Students Scoring above 85 on NYS American History Regents
HIS105, HIS106, HIS205;
POL109;

Western Civilization:

HIS101, HIS102, HIS107, HIS110, HIS201;
IND101, IND102;

Other World Civilizations:

ANT101, ANT105, ANT203, ANT205, ANT211;
COM202;
ENG212;
GEO101, GEO102, GEO103;
HIS107, HIS110, HIS118, HIS119, HIS120, HIS220;
PHL111;
POL107, POL111;
SPN175, SPN176;

Humanities:

ART101, ART111, ART112, ART113;
CIN111, CIN112, CIN114, CIN156;
COM105, COM121, COM131, COM133, COM204;
ENG102, ENG141, ENG142, ENG143, ENG144,
ENG177, ENG202, ENG205, ENG206, ENG209,
ENG210, ENG211, ENG212, ENG213, ENG214,
ENG215, ENG216, ENG218, ENG219, ENG220,
ENG221, ENG223, ENG226;
HUM111, HUM120, HUM218;
IND101, IND102, IND123;
ITL175;
MUS101, MUS206, MUS210;
PHL101, PHL104, PHL105, PHL107, PHL111,
PHL112, PHL113, PHL201, PHL202, PHL211,
PHL212, PHL213, PHL214, PHL215, PHL216, PHL293;
SPN175, SPN176, SPN222, SPN224, SPN225,
SPN226;
THR211, THR212;

The Arts:

ART101, ART111, ART112, ART113, ART114,
ART116, ART124, ART130, ART133, ART135,
ART140, ART141, ART145, ART161, ART171,
ART181, ART202, ART209, ART210;
CIN114, CIN156;
DIA115, DIA116;
DNC101, DNC105;
ENG202;
GRD104, GRD207;
INT101;
MTR105;
MUS101, MUS103, MUS105, MUS117, MUS120,
MUS122, MUS123, MUS131, MUS132, MUS133,
MUS134, MUS135, MUS206, MUS210;
THR101, THR105, THR120, THR131, THR211,
THR212, THR214;

Foreign Language:

ASL101, ASL105;
CHI101, CHI102;
FRE101, FRE102, FRE201, FRE202;
GER101, GER102, GER201, GER202;
ITL101, ITL102, ITL113, ITL201, ITL202,
ITL220;
JPN101, JPN102, JPN201, JPN202;
LAT101, LAT102;
SPN101, SPN102, SPN113, SPN126, SPN127,
SPN201, SPN202, SPN220, SPN223, SPN224;

Basic Communication:

COM101, COM102, COM105;
ENG100; ENG101

Course Descriptions

Accounting

ACC101: Financial Accounting I

Computer lab-enhanced instruction examines nature and purposes of financial accounting theory, procedures and reporting for economic entities including financial statements and valuation. This course develops foundation knowledge for additional learning in subsequent courses. (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

ACC102: Financial Accounting II

An introduction to accounting concepts for partnerships, corporations, and manufacturing entities. The course focuses on long-term liabilities, financial statement analysis, statement of cash flow, managerial concepts and principles, job order casting, process costing, cost behavior, and cost-value profit analysis. Designed primarily for students anticipating careers in accounting or business or who otherwise require detailed understanding of financial and managerial accounting practices. Prerequisite: ACC101. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

ACC115: Managerial Accounting

Emphasis on attention-directing and problem-solving functions of accounting with respect to management planning and controlling fiscal activities. Recommended for all students outside accounting emphasis. Prerequisite: ACC101. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

ACC116: Practical Accounting

Includes three practice sets specially designed to provide students opportunity to prepare federal and state tax forms relating to depreciation, payroll, sales tax, corporate income, and franchise taxes. Also covers the one-write system, bank reconciliations and physical inventory procedures. Prerequisite: ACC101. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

ACC137: Computer Accounting Principles

Introductory course providing students with hands-on use of typical computer applications software for accounting. General ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, inventory and payroll systems set-up and utilization for service and merchandising business entities will be included. Note: Students need access to a PC desktop/laptop computer to use the required QuickBooks Accounting (QBA) software at home. Prerequisite: ACC101. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

ACC145: Principles of Fraud Examination

Fraud examination will cover the principles and methodology of fraud detection and deterrence. The course includes such topics as skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, register disbursement schemes, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement schemes, non-cash misappropriations, corruption, accounting principles and fraud, fraudulent financial statements and interviewing witnesses. Prerequisite: ACC101. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

ACC201: Intermediate Accounting I

Stresses theoretical and analytical aspects of financial accounting. Topics include the Balance Sheet and Income Statement with particular emphasis on current assets, fixed assets and current liabilities. Pertinent pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: ACC102. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

ACC202: Intermediate Accounting II

Involves same theoretical and analytical approach of ACC102 but topical emphasis is on corporate capital, long-term liabilities, investments, fund flow, analysis, and reconstruction of financial statements. Pertinent pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: ACC201. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

ACC210: Cost Accounting

Basic principles and procedures of cost accounting and cost control in a manufacturing organization through study of job order, process and standard cost procedures, budgeting, predetermined cost, variance and decision analysis. Prerequisite: ACC102 or ACC115. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

ACC212: Electronic Spreadsheet Applications for Accounting

Concentrates on financial and managerial accounting applications with particular emphasis on using advanced spreadsheet financial functions related to recording business transactions; developing adjusted trial balance; preparing financial statements; analyzing and presenting accounts receivable; analyzing inventory; accounting for property, plant, and equipment; examining bonds payable and time value of money; evaluating performance; understanding cost-volume-profit relationships; and capital budgeting supported by spreadsheet graphics, database and macro capabilities. Prerequisite: ACC101 and (ACC137, BUS112, or CST101). Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

ACC214: Corporate Finance

Introductory course in business financial management. Deals with need for funds within the firm and alternative institutions and financial instruments available. Prerequisite: ACC102. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

ACC218: Federal Income Taxation

History of income taxation, gross income and exclusions therefrom; deductions; credits; exemptions; capital gains; depreciation, inventory and accounting methods; accounting records; preparation and filing of tax returns, with special emphasis on small business and individual taxpayers. Prerequisite: ACC102 or ACC115. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

ACC297: Independent Study: Accounting

Independent study courses in accounting may be available. See the online catalog for a complete listing or contact academic chair. Offered on: A-E-G / 1-4 cr. hrs.

Addiction Studies

ADS111: Addiction in American Society

Comprehensive exploration of historical, pharmacological, social and psychological aspects of abuse of and addiction to substances by society. Explores society's attitudes and misconceptions about substance use and reviews current theories of addiction treatment and prevention for both addicts and significant others. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

ADS112: Certified Recovery Peer Advocate-CRPA Training

Comprehensive exploration of the role of the CRPA in terms of being an advocate for individuals with a substance use disorder and co-existing disorders. Training includes supportive and advocacy skills for an individual’s recovery and wellness plan. Examples of mentoring, education and providing ethical professional actions are presented. Participants will also prepare for the CRPA exam administered by the New York State Association of Substance Abuse Providers. No prerequisite. Corequisite: ADS111. Offered on G / 3 credit hrs.

ADS113: Certified Recovery Peer Advocate-CRPA Field Practicum

Integrates knowledge and theory learned in ADS111 and ADS112 with actual practice in a community based clinical setting. Students complete 120 hours of off-campus fieldwork experience as a CRPA intern in an OASAS licensed treatment setting, a general hospital or a community based human service agency and 15 hours of on campus classroom clinical group supervision. 46 of the off-campus hours will be specific to the 4 best practice domains were covered in ADS112, with 10 hours each in the domains of Advocacy, Mentoring/Education, Recovery/Wellness Support and 16 hours in the domain of Ethical Responsibility. Time sheets documenting work hours will be collected by the course instructor and signed by the student’s agency assigned field site supervisor. Time sheets will also document supervision hours specific to each of these domains. Prerequisites: ADS111, ADS112. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

ADS115: Dynamics of Addiction

In-depth exploration of biological, psychological and social theories of substance use disorder and addiction with emphasis on their implications for prevention and treatment. Related addictive behaviors including concept of co-dependence are studied. Prerequisite: ADS111 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

ADS120: Family Systems and Addiction

Comprehensive exploration of effects of addiction and dysfunction on nuclear and extended family systems. Focuses on identification, education and treatment of "significant others" who may be affected by a person's substance abuse or addiction. Prerequisite: ADS111 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

ADS225: Criminal Justice System and Addiction

Exploration of formal and informal responses of criminal justice system to crimes and social disorder related to alcohol/substance abuse. Includes analysis of effectiveness of both law enforcement and diversionary strategies to combat endemic problems of controlled substances and alcohol. Prerequisite: ADS111 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

ADS230: Professional Documentation: Data Collection, Assessment, Treatment Planning

Comprehensive examination of all documentation utilized in various health system agencies, with particular attention to those agencies specializing in alcohol and substance use disorder treatment. This course includes actual preparation of various professional materials, i.e., psychosocial data and assessments, treatment plans, clinical reports, progress notes and other specialized material. Prerequisite: ADS111 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

ADS235: Techniques for Counseling in Addiction Services

In-depth examination of basic precepts of helping relationships. The student studies and practices client interviewing, goal setting, development and implementation of a client action plan, and how to promote client motivation. Emphasizes working with the chemically dependent client. Prerequisite: ADS115 and ADS120 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

ADS242: Vocational Counseling and Addiction Prevention Programs

Development and implementation of the Vocational and Educational Treatment Plan with an individual with a substance use disorder. Exploration of the history of substance abuse prevention efforts with emphasis on various approaches to the problem and evaluation of their effectiveness. Includes evaluation of needs of special populations within the larger community. Current theory and practice are reviewed through a study of several actual prevention programs. Students expected to develop and present a prevention lesson in the class. Prerequisite: ADS111 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

ADS246: Advanced Techniques for Counseling Substance Use Disorder

Advanced counseling and therapy concepts and techniques that apply to assessment, diagnosis and treatment modalities for addictions and for psychosocial conditions that may coexist with the substance use disorder condition. Also addresses collateral treatment concerns for “significant other” persons involved with the client who has a substance use disorder as well as appropriate uses of supervision, peer support, professional affiliations, and continuing professional education for the practitioner. Working with health professionals on the treatment team emphasized. Prerequisite: ADS235. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

ADS252: Professional Ethics and Cultural Competence in Addiction Services

This course will include the OASAS required hours specific to Ethics and Cultural Competence for addiction professionals, including the required child abuse and maltreatment mandated reporter NYS Education Department approved training. Coursework will include education on, but not limited to, understanding the ethics and professional responsibilities of the counselor-client relationship, the CASAC Canon of Ethical Principles, ethical decision making and conduct, critical thinking skills, counselor self-disclosure, confidentiality laws and regulations (HIPPA and 42CFR part 2), responsibility to seek out and utilize clinical supervision and the importance of counselor wellness and self-evaluation. The course will also address counseling special populations/cultural competency. It will provide knowledge of the specific substance use disorder prevention/treatment needs of particular populations and development of the skills necessary to effectively counsel individuals in those populations as well as training to develop the ability to understand, communicate with and effectively interact with people across diverse cultures. Prerequisite: ADS230 and ADS235. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

ADS255: Field Practicum or Cooperative Education in Addiction Services

Integrates theory with actual practice in a clinical setting. Students perform intake interviews and assessments; develop treatment plans, do counseling and present intervention and education approaches, all within the context of the legal, ethical and professional responsibilities of the addictions counselor. Involves off-campus fieldwork, a minimum of 270 hours of clinical experience and 30 hours of supervision. Students attend two-hour, weekly on-campus supervision seminars. Internship placements must be in a NYSOASAS licensed treatment program and be supervised by a qualified health professional. (18 hrs. clinical, 2 hrs. seminar) Prerequisite: ADS120, ADS225 and ADS235. Corequisite: ADS246. Offered on: G / 7 cr. hrs.

American Sign Language

ASL101: American Sign Language I

Introduces American Sign Language, the visual-gestural language of the deaf. Incorporates nonverbal communication techniques, basic vocabulary, grammar principles and conversational skills. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E / 3 cr. hrs.

ASL103: Deaf Culture and Contemporary Issues

Introduces culture and heritage of deaf Americans and recent developments in fields of sign language and deafness. Covers causes of deafness, degrees of hearing impairment; educational, linguistic and social needs of deaf individuals; diverse philosophies of deaf education, and roles of professionals working with deaf people. Familiarizes students with contemporary issues and current trends. Presents future employment opportunities for persons with American Sign Language skills. No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

ASL105: American Sign Language II

Expands skills in American Sign Language. Emphasis placed on expressive and receptive conversational skills including vocabulary expansion, deaf idioms and creative use of visual vernacular. Prerequisite: ASL101. Offered on: A-E / 3 cr. hrs.

ASL201: American Sign Language III

Further development of manual fluency in American Sign Language. Stress placed on conversational regulators, facilitating behaviors, morphological process, subtle non-manual cues, sign fluidity and casual vs. citation sign formations. (offered fall semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: ASL105. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

ASL203: Fingerspelling

Introduces manual representation of words of a spoken language. Emphasis on development of hand configuration, basic word patterns, rhythm and fluidity. Additional focus placed on fingerspelled loan signs. (offered fall semester only) Prerequisite: ASL105. Offered on: A / 2 cr. hrs.

ASL210: Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English

Emphasizes importance of the student understanding the two languages: American Sign Language and English, and working between the two languages as an interpreter or worker in the deaf community. Provides in-depth study of phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics of American Sign Language in comparison with those of English. (offered spring semester only) Prerequisite: ASL201. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

ASL220: American Sign Language IV

Integrates well-developed American Sign Language communicative skills with interactive opportunities within the community of language users, i.e., the deaf community. Emphasis on cultural aspects inherent in the language: literature, values and attitudes, regional and social variations. (offered spring semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: ASL201. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

ASL297: Independent Study: American Sign Language

Independent study courses in American Sign Language may be available. See the online catalog for a complete listing or contact academic chair. Offered on: A-E-G / 1-4 cr. hrs.

Anthropology

ANT101: Cultural Anthropology

Introductory course studying broad range of cultural similarities and differences among human populations. Using ethnographic accounts as a database, initial focus is on non-Western cultures. Comparisons with more technologically advanced cultures provide important insights into how culture works. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Social Sciences and Other World Civilizations. Prerequisite: RDG099 or ESL012 or equivalent. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

ANT103: Physical Anthropology

Explores fields of paleontology, primatology and human physical variation as they relate to human evolution. Change and stability, adaptation and extinction are major themes. Findings from evolutionary biology, behavioral ecology, and the hominid fossil record are integrated in order to understand the transition from ape to human. Where do we come from? Why do we behave the way we do? Where are we going? Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Social Sciences. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

ANT105: Introduction to Archaeology

Explores basic concepts and methods of archaeological research, including nature of the archaeological record and how archaeologists generate and analyze data. Excavation, analysis and interpretation of material remains from well-known Old World and New World prehistoric and historic sites are examined. Cultural variation and culture change are major themes. Emphasizes application of these concepts to our own culture. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Social Sciences and Other World Civilizations. No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

ANT203: Anthropology of Religion

Studies religion as an institution in primitive society. Places emphasis on anthropological methodology as a tool for understanding folk religious systems. Works of such anthropologists as Durkheim, Malinowski, Boas and Levi-Strauss are considered as they pertain to religious development. Application of anthropological methodology is demonstrated by use of North American, South American, Oceanic and African culture areas. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Social Sciences and Other World Civilizations. Prerequisite: ANT101, PSY101 or SOC101. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

ANT211: Caribbean Cultures

Interdisciplinary study of historical and contemporary elements of diverse cultures in the Caribbean. Topics include history, economics, social institutions, cultural patterns and the arts. May be taken for social science or humanities credit. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Other World Civilizations. No prerequisite. Offered on: E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

ANT295: Special Topics: Anthropology

Special and current topics in Anthropology may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

ANT296: Special Topics Honors: Anthropology

Honors special topics in Anthropology may be available for Honors students as well as those who have received permission from a campus Honors Program Coordinator. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

Astronomy

AST101: Astronomy of the Solar System

Introduction to fundamental aspects of planetary science. Topics include historical development of astronomy; basic concepts of celestial coordinates and motions; properties and individual characteristics of planets and their moons, asteroids, comets and meteoroids; and origin and evolution of the solar system. Students also learn to identify celestial objects (constellations, prominent stars, planets, etc.) utilizing planetarium, telescopes and unaided eye. Occasional evening observations required. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

AST102: Astronomy of Stars and Galaxies

Introduction to fundamental aspects of universe beyond our solar system. Topics include properties of electromagnetic radiation and its relation to study of celestial objects; structure, classification and evolution of stars, nebulae, star clusters, galaxies, and material between stars. Age, origin and evolution of universe studied in terms of modern cosmology. Occasional evening observations required. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory.) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

AST103: Search for Life in the Universe

This course explores the question of whether or not life exists elsewhere in the Universe. An interdisciplinary approach will be taken using concepts from astronomy, physics, chemistry, and biology to explore the likelihood of life developing beyond Earth. In addition, the course will focus on recent/current developments concerning space expeditions designed to seek out possible forms of life on other worlds in our solar system. Sociological and philosophical viewpoints on the topic of life forming in other parts of the Universe will be discussed. Students will be expected to perform elementary mathematics, think critically, acquire and interpret data, present original thoughts/opinions in both oral and written form. The scientific method will be the cornerstone of the course's endeavors to demonstrate how to use scientifically established facts as the basis for the search for life beyond Earth. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

AST201: Observational Astronomy

One-semester course devoted to systematic observations of the sun, moon, transits, eclipses, occultations and meteor showers. Various telescopes used for this study and for further study of planets, deep sky objects, binary stars, variable stars and asteroids. To best complete the coursework, irregular hours of observations, planetarium sessions and field trips are required. (offered fall semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 1 hr. recitation, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: AST101 or AST102. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

AST202: Einstein's Universe--High-Energy Astronomy

This course seeks to introduce the student to those topics that students are traditionally fascinated with, but are only briefly mentioned in AST102: Astronomy of Stars and Galaxies, such as Einstein's theories of relativity, the possibility and limits of time travel, exotic star death, the origin and nature of black holes and where they reside, the origins and possible scenarios for the death of the universe and the speculative evidence for the existence of the multiverse, and show how these ideas have come about from the work of Albert Einstein. (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

AST295: Special Topics: Astronomy

Special and current topics in Astronomy may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

AST296: Special Topics Honors: Astronomy

Honors special topics in Astronomy may be available for Honors students as well as those who have received permission from a campus Honors Program Coordinator. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

AST297: Independent Study: Astronomy

Independent study courses in astronomy may be available. See the online catalog for a complete listing or contact academic chair. Offered on: A-E-G / 1-4 cr. hrs.

Automotive Technology

Enrollment in AUT courses is limited to students officially admitted to the program. Students not in an Automotive program interested in taking AUT111 should contact the department.

AUT105: Automotive Portfolio I

The four units of A-Port will provide students the opportunity to build soft skills, prepare for and gain employment as an automotive technician. This course is designed to help students with employment related skills including resume writing, interview skills, job attainment, and certification. The focus of Portfolio I is job preparation and readiness and is designed to prepare the student for the work-based learning experience that begins in semester II. Students in the Automotive Service Specialist, A.A.S. degree must successfully complete all four portfolio classes and one summer co-op experience for a total of 640 hours of total work experience to graduate. (offered fall semester only) (1.5 contact hrs.) No prerequisite. Offered on: A / .5 cr. hr.

AUT111: Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair

This course will cover the fundamentals of automotive maintenance and light repair and is designed for students who are preparing for entry into an automotive program of study, preparing for an entry-level position in the automotive service or for those who may simply wish to learn more about their own vehicles. This course covers a broad range of topics related to automotive technology. No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr hrs.

AUT112: Integrated Automotive Systems

This course is designed to prepare the student for entry into the workforce as an automotive maintenance and light repair technician. The course will cover the theory, inspection and maintenance of vehicle systems and subsystems found on modem automobiles and light trucks. Major topics covered include: Shop safety, tool and equipment identification, component identification and vehicle service procedures. The lab portion of this class focuses on the hands-on skills and competencies required of an entry-level automotive technician. Students will be required to pass a final hands-on skills evaluation that will include performing entry level tasks required by the automotive industry. Students will be required to achieve a 70% or higher on the final skills assessment in order to register for Automotive Portfolio II. (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT113: Automotive Electricity and Electronics I

Automotive Electricity and Electronics I will explore the operation, diagnosis and repair of vehicle electrical and electronic systems. Major topics include electrical and electronic theory and diagnostic tools and resources. This course will introduce the student to the competencies required to take the ASE "A6" technician certification test. Hands-on tasks required by Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) in the area of Electricity and Electronics will be covered in detail. This course is designed to prepare the student for final hands-on skills validation. This is the first of two electrical classes designed to prepare the student for the ASE A6 Electricity and Electronics certification exam. (offered fall semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT117: Automotive Braking Systems

This course will cover the theory, maintenance, repair, and diagnosis of modem automotive braking systems. Laboratory procedures will include an in-depth study of the removal, disassembly, inspection, rebuilding, overhauling, installation, adjustment and the diagnosis of the automotive brake components and related assemblies. Major topics to include: hydraulic, pneumatic and mechanical, electrical and electronic components of the brakes of an automobile. The use of appropriate service information, tools and equipment will be emphasized. This course provides basic theory and hands-on experiences required for successful completion of the ASE area (A5) Brakes certification exam. (offered fall semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT118: Computer Systems and Fuel Delivery

Theory and operation of onboard computer systems employed on vehicles. Topics include introduction to Engine Control Module computer operation, input sensor operation and actuator output operation. Computer diagnostics and scan tool interface covered in detail. (offered spring semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: AUT112 and AUT113. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT123: Automotive Steering and Suspension Systems

This course will cover the theory, maintenance, repair and diagnosis of automotive Steering and Suspension Systems. Laboratory procedures will include hands-on study of above lecture topics. Major topics will include: Wheels, tires, steering and suspension components, and wheel alignment. The use of appropriate service information, tools and equipment will be emphasized. This course provides basic theory and hands-on experience required for successful completion of ASE area A4: Suspension and Steering. (offered spring semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: AUT112 and AUT113. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT124: Automotive Electricity and Electronics II

Automotive Electricity and Electronics II will explore the diagnosis and repair of advanced level vehicle electrical and electronic systems. Major topics include: Electrical and electronic control devices, test equipment, diagnostic procedures, electrical wiring schematics and electronic service information. This course will continue to prepare the student for the ASE "A6" technician certification test. Hands-on tasks required by Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) in the area of Electricity and electronics will be covered in detail. Students are expected to register for and attempt the ASE A6 Electricity and Electronics examination at the end of AUT124. (offered spring semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: AUT112 and AUT113. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT125: Automotive Portfolio II

The four units of A-Port will provide students the opportunity to build soft skills, prepare for and gain employment as an automotive technician. This course is designed to help the student with employment related skills including resume writing, interview skills, job attainment, and certification. The focus of Portfolio II is continued development of job place skills. The work based learning experience will begin in early January before the start of the formal 15 week semester. Students will be required to complete 80 hours of supervised work based learning during this course. Students in the Automotive Service Specialist, A.A.S. degree must successfully complete all four portfolio classes and one summer co-op experience for a total of 640 hours of total work experience to graduate. Registration in each of these courses requires that students purchase liability insurance through the College. Students will be required to achieve a 70% or higher on the final skills assessment in order to register for Automotive Portfolio II. (offered spring semester only) (1.5 hrs. practicum) Prerequisite: AUT105, AUT112 and AUT113. Offered on: A / .5 cr. hr.

AUT150: Automotive Cooperative

The summer co-op experience will provide the students the opportunity to build on the skills required to be successful in the workplace. This course is designed to reinforce classroom learning through a supervised hands on experience at the worksite. Students will be required to complete 400 hours of co-op time during the summer co-op. Students must successfully complete all four portfolio classes and one summer co-op experience for a total of 640 hours of total work experience to graduate. Registration in each of these courses requires that students purchase liability insurance through the College. (offered summer semester only) (3 hrs. practicum) Prerequisite: AUT105, AUT112, and AUT125. Offered on: A / 2 cr. hrs.

AUT205: Automotive Portfolio III

The four units of A-Port will provide students the opportunity to build soft skills, prepare for and gain employment as an automotive technician. This course is designed to help the student with employment related skills including resume writing, interview skills, job attainment, and certification. The focus of Portfolio III is continued development of job place skills. Students will be required to complete 80 hours of supervised work based learning during this course. Students in the Automotive Service Specialist, A.A.S. degree must successfully complete all four portfolio classes and one summer co-op experience for a total of 640 hours of total work experience to graduate. Registration in each of these courses requires that students purchase liability insurance through the college. (offered fall semester only) (1.5 hrs. practicum) Prerequisite: AUT150. Offered on: A / .5 cr. hr.

AUT222: Automotive Heating and Air Conditioning

Theory and operation of auto heating, air conditioning and ventilation systems. Training focuses on diagnosing and repairing systems and control equipment. (offered spring semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: AUT112 and AUT113. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT225: Automotive Portfolio IV

The four units of A-Port will provide students the opportunity to build soft skills, prepare for and gain employment as an automotive technician. This course is designed to help the student with employment related skills including resume writing, interview skills, job attainment, and certification. The focus of Portfolio IV is the completion of the automotive portfolio and required work based learning hours. Students will be required to complete 80 hours of supervised work based learning during this course. Students in the Automotive Service Specialist, A.A.S. degree must successfully complete all four portfolio classes and one summer co-op experience for a total of 640 Hours of total work experience to graduate. Registration in each of these courses requires that students purchase liability insurance through the college. (offered fall semester only) (1.5 hrs. practicum) Prerequisite: AUT205. Offered on: A / .5 cr. hr.

AUT226: Fuel Injection and Engine Emission Systems

Combustion by-products contained in gasoline engine exhaust: carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, unburned hydrocarbons, oxygen. Focus on systems used in vehicles to control these emissions. Students learn procedures and accurate specifications necessary to achieve desired vehicle emissions, including driveability diagnosis. Environmental rules and regulations and their impact on automotive repair industry discussed. (offered fall semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: AUT112, AUT113, and AUT118. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT234: Engine Theory and Overhaul

Begins with principles of internal combustion engine. Components and functions of gasoline engines studied. Engines are properly disassembled, parts identified, inspected, measured and reassembled. Engine break-in and proper testing demonstrated. Emphasis on troubleshooting, diagnosis and proper service procedures. (offered fall semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: AUT112, AUT113, and AUT118. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT236: Automotive Service Productivity and Efficiency

Different theories related to running productive service department. Students study ways to improve productivity which increase their performance, evaluation of specialized tools vs. their cost, costs of purchasing tools on time, evaluation of repair procedures for safety, and timesaving steps. Students conduct time study as part of course. (offered fall semester only) Prerequisite: AUT125. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT241: Manual Transmissions and Drivetrain Systems

Manual Transmission and Drivetrain will explore the operation, diagnosis and repair of manual transmission I transaxle and drivetrain related concerns. Major topics include transmission removal and overhaul. This course will prepare the student for the ASE A3 technician certification test. Hands-on tasks required by Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) in the area of Engine Repair will be covered in detail. This course is designed to prepare the student for formal hands-on skills validation and is heavily lab based. Students are expected to register for and attempt the ASE A3 Manual Transmission and Drivetrain examination at the end of this class. (offered spring semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: AUT112 and AUT113. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT243: Automatic Transmission and Transaxle Systems

This course will cover the theoretical understanding of the principles, maintenance, diagnostics and adjustments required by today's electronically controlled automatic transmissions and transaxles. Laboratory procedures will include an in-depth study of the removal, disassembly, inspection, reassembly, installation, adjustment and the diagnosis of automatic transmissions/transaxle assemblies. Topics to include: hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, and electrical/electronic controls of modern automatic transmissions and transaxles. The use of appropriate service information, tools and equipment will be emphasized. This course provides basic theory and experience required for successful completion of ASE area A2: Automatic Transmission/Transaxle. (offered spring semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: AUT112 and AUT113. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

AUT246: Automotive Dealership Structure and Functions

Various aspects of service management as typically found in automotive dealership. Topics include theory of service supremacy or other divisional equivalent, federal and state regulation, insurance, purchasing procedures, facility planning, lease and purchase agreements, customer relations, labor relations, and consumer group organizations. (offered spring semester only) No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

Biology

BIO100-129: Courses specifically designed for non-science majors. No science prerequisite.

BIO130-149: Introductory level courses primarily for health career students.

BIO150-159: Introductory courses for science majors.

BIO200-229: Intermediate courses primarily for non-science majors. All have prerequisites.

BIO230-250: Second level courses primarily for health career students.

BIO260-269: Courses for both science and non-science majors. All have prerequisites.

BIO270-280: For science majors who have completed the introductory science courses.

BIO295-296: Special Topics and Honors Special Topics Courses.

See “Environmental Science” or “Marine Science” for related courses.

BIO101: Principles of Biology

A one-semester survey course for non-biology majors. Key concepts include biological chemistry, cell structure and function, organization of multicellular organisms, genetics, evolution and ecology. Notes: (1) Course specifically designed for non-science majors. (2) Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO103: Human Ecology

The course explores the dynamic balance within the ecosphere. The flow of energy and mineral resources is examined in natural and human systems, and human impacts on this natural balance and flow of resources are studied. Social causes and solutions to ecological insults are also investigated. The laboratory examines, either through experiments or field study, characteristics of different ecosystems, stresses and impacts on different ecosystems, and current human actions to solve or prevent ecological problems. Notes: (1) Course specifically designed for non-science majors. (2) Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO105: Survey of the Human Body

Survey of biological chemistry, cell structure and function, tissues and organ systems of the human body, and genetics. Notes: (1) Course specifically designed for non-science majors. (2) Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Offered on: A-E / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO109: Plants and People

Through lectures, labs and field trips, plants are studied from three different points of view: historical, biological and ecological. From a historical point of view, the course emphasizes the role of plants in human development and their importance in history and discovery, investigating how plants are used by humanity in nutrition, housing, medicine and cultural practices. From the biological point of view, the course includes basic plant biology: plant structure and function, including cell morphology, plant anatomy and elementary plant physiology. Main groups of plants are studied with emphasis on flowering plants. Emphasizes hands-on learning. Notes: (1) Course specifically designed for non-science majors. (2) Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (offered spring semester and sometimes summer semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO111: Botany

A study of the principles of structure and function of plants. Plant cells, tissues, roots, stems, leaves and flowers are discussed in detail. Plant classification, ecology, growth and development, photosynthesis, respiration, genetics and reproduction are among topics covered. Emphasis on flowering plants, although other groups are treated in their evolutionary context. Activities in the campus greenhouse are an integral part of the course. Notes: (1) Course specifically designed for non-science majors. (2) Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Offered on: A-E / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO121: Insect Biology

This course introduces the science of entomology in a survey of the taxonomy, morphology, ecology, evolution and behavior of insects (Class Hexapoda). In addition to general insect biology, the course covers insect-plant and insect-human interactions (e.g. pollination, medical entomology). Through field and laboratory work, students will practice insect collection, identification and preservation techniques, and apply these skills in the preparation of a formal insect collection as a term project. Notes: (1) Course specifically designed for non-science majors. (2) Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Offered on: E / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO130: Anatomy and Physiology I

Anatomy and Physiology I is the first part of a two-course sequence. It discusses in depth the basic principles of the structure and function of the human body. The topics covered include the study of human body plan and organization, homeostasis, chemistry and cell biology, histology, the integumentary system, the skeletal system and articulations, the muscular system, the nervous system and special senses. It emphasizes the interrelationships among the body systems and the regulation of the physiology involved in maintaining homeostasis. Special attention is given to the application of these principles and concepts to health-related areas. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent and AP Biology (3 or higher within last 5 years), high school biology (85 or higher within the last 5 years) or any college-level biology course with a minimum grade of C. Recommended: CHE100 or equivalent. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO132: Anatomy and Physiology II

Basic principles of the structure and function of the human body are discussed in depth for each of the organ systems. Physiology is presented from both a biochemical and organismal point of view. The endocrine, digestive, respiratory, urinary, immune, cardiovascular, and reproductive systems will be emphasized. Basic chemistry, physics and mathematics are introduced where useful and necessary for understanding these biological phenomena. Special attention given to the application of these principles and concepts to health-related areas. Second course in a two-semester sequence. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: BIO130 with a C or better. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO138: Fundamentals of Human Structure and Function

The human body as a wholly integrated, self-regulating model of functional anatomy. Introduces human structure at the cellular level and progresses to tissues, organs and organ systems. Common pathologic conditions are contrasted with normal form and function. Notes: (1) Preference given to students in Health Information Technology. (2) Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007. Offered on: G / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO150: College Biology I: Cellular and Molecular Biology

This course is a comprehensive study of the basic processes in living systems at the cellular and molecular levels of organization. Basic chemistry, aspects of cell structure, metabolism, cell energetics, and elements of classical and molecular genetics serve as the foundation for subsequent investigation of living systems. The principles of evolution underlie all discussions in the course. This course is the first semester of a three-semester sequence designed for science majors. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory.) Prerequisite: High school chemistry (B or better within 3 years), CHE100 or equivalent; and MAT007 or equivalent. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO151: College Biology II: Organismal Biology

This course is an introduction to the structure, development and the physiological processes of plants and animals. All levels of biological organization from the cellular to the organism are assessed. It includes the comparative study of major organismal systems including nutrition, transport and gas exchange systems, regulation of the internal environment, the nervous system, and reproduction. Special attention is placed on the phylogenetic origins and ecological placement of different taxonomic groups as their anatomy and physiologies are discussed. Designed for science majors. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: BIO150 and CHE133 with C or better. Prerequisite/corequisite: MAT141 with a C or better. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO210: Field Biology and Ecology

The course considers the functional aspects of natural communities and ecosystems. The relation of ecology to evolutionary ideas is stressed and the natural population in its community serves as the basic study unit. Examples largely drawn from communities of North America, Long Island in particular. Field trips emphasize identification of local life forms and their role in natural communities. Lab work investigates general ecological principles. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (offered fall semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: BIO101 or BIO150 or MAR105 or ENV101. Offered on: A-E / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO244: General Microbiology

Introduction to microbiology by a survey of methods, tools and techniques used in studying main groups of bacteria and other medically significant microorganisms as well as the application of this knowledge to their physical and chemical control. In addition, the relationship of microorganisms to biotechnology and disease is discussed. This course is recommended for students interested in nursing and other health sciences. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: BIO132 with a C or better. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO245: Kinesiology

Analysis of skeletal, muscular and nervous systems provides basis for understanding human movement with emphasis on sport skills and dance forms. Mechanical principles underlying movement and their relationship to performance of skills emphasized. (offered fall semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisites: BIO130 and BIO132. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO246: Anatomy and Physiology of Human Movement

A comprehensive anatomy and physiology course that focuses on all aspects related to human movement. The course is designed for the Physical Therapist Assistant Program. In depth discussions on the myofascial, musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine and digestive systems will help give students a greater understanding of how the systems work synergistically to allow for human movement. Concepts involving the reproductive, urinary, and immune systems will be also be covered to create a holistic picture of how the 10 major organ systems relate to human function. Common pathologies that relate to the systems will be covered. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (offered spring semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: BIO130 with C+ or better. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO252: College Biology III: Organisms and Ecosystems

This course is an introductory study of the basic processes leading to the biodiversity of life from the organismal to ecosystem level of organization. An in-depth study of natural selection and evolution will serve as the context for the study of the biodiversity of major groups of living organisms and their phylogenetic relationships. The course will also cover central themes in ecology from population and community structure to geochemical cycling in the biosphere. Designed for science majors. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: BIO150 with a C or better. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO255: Forensic Biology

This course focuses on the biological aspects of forensic investigation and analyses of biological evidence from various crime scenes. Particular emphasis will be given to DNA analyses, fingerprinting, serological analyses of body fluids and other biological materials, the role of the environment on body decomposition, the role of anthropology, and the role of entomology and plant materials in crime investigation. This course is designed for non-science and science majors. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: BIO101 for non-science majors; BIO130 or BIO150 for science majors. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO262: Genetics

The study of classical and molecular models of inheritance with emphasis on advanced topics related to cellular, organismal and population genetics. Laboratory experiments using living organisms illustrate genetic principles and techniques. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: BIO150 with minimum grade of C in the past 3 years. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO270: Embryology

The study of morphological and biochemical events occurring during development. The development of major organ systems in representative vertebrate species are examined with emphasis on genetic and environmental factors involved in congenital malformations. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (offered spring semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: BIO151 or BIO132. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO272: Microbiology

An introduction to the study of microorganisms and their environments. Introduces students to microbial physiology, microbial genetics (including recombinant DNA technology), immunology, microbial ecology and evolution. Designed for science majors. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: BIO151 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO274: Plant Biology and Plant Diversity

An introduction to the study of the plant kingdom including the origin and evolution of land plants. Topics include cellular structure and function, in depth plant anatomy and plant physiology emphasizing hormonal systems involved in growth, development, fructification and senescence. The course covers all major groups of plants concentrating on flowering plants including an in depth study of floral biology, angiosperm reproduction and angiosperm taxonomy. This course also covers an overview of plant ecology, major uses of plants and major issues in plant conservation. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: BIO151. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

BIO295: Special Topics: Biology

Special and current topics in Biology may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

BIO296: Special Topics Honors: Biology

Honors special topics in Biology may be available for Honors students as well as those who have received permission from a campus Honors Program Coordinator. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

BIO297: Independent Study: Biology

Independent study courses in biology may be available. See the online catalog for a complete listing or contact academic chair. Offered on: A-E-G / 1-4 cr. hrs.

Business Administration

BUS101: Introduction to Business

Delves into the most significant activities in business. Topics include ownership, organization, marketing, purchasing, production, business finance, personnel, labor relations and government regulation. Recommended as background for further studies in business. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS102: Money and Finance

Basic coverage of money and credit creation, financial markets and financial decision-making. No prerequisite. Offered on: E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS107: Business Mathematics

Use of mathematics in various business applications. All problem solving is accomplished through arithmetic methods. Topics include percentages, simple and compound interest, discount interest, marketing computations, insurance, basic taxes and investment problems. Note: Does not satisfy mathematics/science elective requirements. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS109: Supervision: Concepts and Practices

Study of supervisory functions from viewpoint of the first-line supervisor. Emphasis on concepts of supervision and practices used by first-line supervisors in putting them into effect. Gives students actual practice through discussions of case problems arising from work situations. For students enrolled in certificate or A.A.S. business programs who plan to enter the business world immediately upon graduation. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS112: Computing for Business

State-of-the-art computer skills related to business major. Emphasis on integrated problem-solving approach. Trains students to make bottom-line decisions using "what if" models and decision trees. Business presentation skills presented using PowerPoint. Current technological business research skills emphasized. Students required to construct a one-page business website. Note: Credit given for CST101 or BUS112, but not both. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

BUS115: College/Workplace Skills Seminar

Introduces business student to general skills needed for success in workplace. Connects the college experience and its impact on students' skills necessary to compete in world of work. Fulfills College Seminar requirement for students in accounting, business-related and paralegal curricula. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 1 cr. hr.

BUS117: Business Communications

Principles of business communication as they relate to the contemporary business organization. Emphasis on management approaches and solutions to communication problems unique to the business community. Topics include word/information processing, employment communication, and effective preparation of business correspondence and reports. Resume writing and marketing oneself for the job search is explored. Prerequisite: ENG101 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS121: Office Management

Introduces scope and responsibilities of administrative office management. Topics include planning, organizing, operating and controlling office operations; leadership and human relations factors; and an overview of the effect office technology has had on the business world including telecommunications, reprographics, office systems, records management, data processing, word processing and voice processing. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS123: Entrepreneurship

Study of environment of small business and functions and philosophy of entrepreneur. Topics include problems in initiating and achieving success in new small business, including financing, marketing, management and legal governmental relationships involved. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS127: Organizational Behavior

Study of the nature of people in a business environment, significance of work, and the human resource. Topics include job satisfaction and motivation, formal and informal work groups, organization and authority, employee relations with the public, decision making and problem solving, the needs and goals of both people and the business environment. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS129: Human Resources Management

Study of purposes, objectives and techniques of personnel administration. The role of personnel administration, human relations, procurement, interviewing, selection and training of personnel, labor relations, research and control of the personnel functions. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS130: Retail Principles

Study of the retail organization, its structure, its personnel and merchandising policies, including introduction to various careers in retailing. Fundamental principles of locating, establishing and operating a retail store are developed. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS132: Retail Buying and Merchandising

Presents basic knowledge of the buyer's role in department store and chain operation. Involves a study of resources, buying techniques, and relationships with resident buying offices. Attention given to such merchandising data as prices, markdowns, stock turnover, markups and planning of stocks and purchases. (offered fall semester only) Prerequisite: BUS130. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS134: Introduction to Fashion Business

Surveys types of business enterprises, activities, operational processes, and their varied interrelationships in the fashion business. Concentration placed on developments and trends of major sectors of the marketing of fashion: primary market, secondary market and retailing. No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS141: Fundamentals of International Business

Familiarizes business students with international business concepts and practices. Special attention given to organizational structure of international business; letters of credit; bills of exchange; foreign drafts; technical procedures; documentation; foreign, consular, and domestic regulations; foreign credits; insuring and financing; and exports. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS150: Cooperative Education in Business

Cooperative Education is supervised on-the-job training directly related to a student's academic major and career interest. Co-op students integrate classroom theory with practical work experience. Through a required weekly seminar, students receive instruction in employment communications and discuss work station learning experiences. Students must be available to work a minimum of 10 hours per week. Interested students should contact appropriate program coordinator on their campus for more information. Registration in this course requires that students purchase liability insurance through the College. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 24 credit hours (12 credits being in the business area, with the exception of CST students), minimum overall GPA of 2.5, and permission of the Academic Chair. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS201: Management Principles and Practices

Study of basic managerial functions of planning, organizing, staffing, direction and control. Emphasis on theory of management, organization and executive leadership. Case studies of actual business situations present problems requiring executive decisions for solution. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS208: Case Studies in Business Administration

Advanced capstone course for Business Administration (A.S.) majors taken final semester before graduation. Working individually and in teams, students integrate, strengthen, expand, apply and document business administration skills and competencies. Through solution of case studies, students demonstrate abilities to think critically, solve managerial, quantitative, and ethical business problems, and utilize contemporary business-related technology. Other active learning assignments may be included as students exercise effective business management and leadership skills and develop global business mindset. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 45 credits in the Business Administration A.S. degree curriculum, including ACC115, BUS201, ENG101, MKT101 and LAW111. Offered on: A-E-G / 1 cr. hr.

BUS209: Issues in Contemporary Business

Advanced capstone course for Business Administration (A.A.S.) majors taken final semester before graduation. Working individually and in teams, students demonstrate abilities to think critically, solve managerial, quantitative and ethical business problems, utilize business-related technology, and exhibit effective leadership in response to current business events and case studies. Through variety of learner-centered activities, students assemble portfolios documenting effective communication skills, understanding, and practical knowledge of business administration. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 45 credits in the Business Administration A.A.S. degree curriculum, including ACC101, BUS101, LAW111, MKT101, and a business elective. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS230: Retail Store Operations and Administration

Study of day-to-day management of the store and its component departments. Emphasis given to functions commonly performed by retail managers during their first years following graduation from college. Major topics include management of personnel, inventory and equipment; store security; and administration of merchandising plans. (offered spring semester only) Prerequisite: BUS130. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

BUS295: Special Topics: Business: Management

Special and current topics in Business may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

BUS297: Independent Study: Business: Management

Independent study courses in business may be available. See the online catalog for a complete listing or contact academic chair. Offered on: A-E-G / 1-4 cr. hrs.

Business: Marketing

MKT101: Marketing

Introduction to fundamental marketing theories, practices and problems. Attention directed to marketing strategies including distribution, pricing, promotion and product. In addition, consumer behavior and government regulation are examined in a marketing context. Current events and case problems are integrated with standard course material for discussion. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

MKT107: Consumer Behavior

Examination of theories and research findings relating to consumer motivation and behavior. Employs an interdisciplinary approach by utilizing disciplines of anthropology, psychology, economics and sociology to understand consumers, their preferences, decisions and spending behavior, role of motivation, and use of such information as applied in marketing. No prerequisite. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

MKT201: Marketing Management

Advanced course in marketing management which focuses on major types of decisions facing the marketing executive in attempts to harmonize objectives and resources of the firm with opportunities found in the marketplace. Strengthens student's ability to analyze these complex marketing situations and to further define and select optimum alternatives through proper application of current marketing theory. Extensive use made of published marketing management case studies and marketing simulations. Prerequisite: MKT101. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

MKT213: Advertising

Study of procedures and techniques of advertising. Special attention given to purposes of advertising, creating advertising ideas, writing copy, trademarks, fundamentals of advertising layout, selecting and using media, market research, and the advertising agency. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

MKT216: Principles of Sales

Study of basic principles of successful selling. Consideration of place of the salesperson in our competitive economy, developing a sales-winning personality, and the 'selling cycle' from prospecting through closing the sale. Films and practice sales presentations by students are included. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

MKT218: Marketing Research

Techniques of doing market research, its application, methods of gathering information, sampling methods, analysis and final report writing. (offered spring semester only) Prerequisite: MKT101 and MAT103. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

MKT220: International Marketing

Examines the marketing process and changing global environment. Focuses on problems, policies and strategies involved in marketing products in foreign markets. Prerequisite: MKT101. Offered on: A-G / 3 cr. hrs.

MKT230: Sports Marketing

Exposes students to the sports industry as it focuses on the marketing of sports in the professional leagues, teams and events, amateur sports, sporting goods, sports media and the promotion of college sports. It also looks at marketing of non-sports products through sports with an introduction to sponsorship, licensing, branding and athlete endorsement. Students will apply marketing concepts and strategies to the sports industry through the development of sports marketing and promotion strategies and plans. Prerequisite: MKT101. Offered on: A-G / 3 cr. hrs.

MKT295: Special Topics: Business: Marketing

Special and current topics in Business: Marketing may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

MKT297: Independent Study: Business: Marketing

Independent study courses in business may be available. See the online catalog for a complete listing or contact academic chair. Offered on: A-E-G / 1-4 cr. hrs.

Chemistry

Safety goggles and lab coat/apron must be worn in all chemistry laboratories.

CHE100: General Chemistry

A one-semester course introducing basic concepts of chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, bonding, chemical equations, changes in energy, gas laws, acid-base chemistry, solutions, and chemical equilibria. Laboratory techniques are introduced and followed by experiments which illustrate basic principles presented in lecture. Notes: (1) No prior knowledge in chemistry required. (2) Credit given for CHE100 or CHE122, but not both. (3) Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or high school Algebra I or equivalent. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

CHE105: Chemistry and Our Environment

A one-semester survey course for non-science majors, emphasizing chemical aspects of our human environment. It is designed to give students a general understanding of the basic concepts of introductory chemistry in relation to environmental and social chemical concerns, and focuses more on concepts than mathematics. Topics such as air quality, ozone layer destruction, greenhouse effect, global warming, water quality, acid rain, and present and future energy sources will be discussed. The laboratory will provide hands-on chemical experience and supplement chemistry principles presented in lecture. This course fulfills laboratory science elective requirement. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education requirement for Natural Sciences (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory). Prerequisite: MAT007 or high school Algebra I or equivalent. Offered on: G / 4 cr. hrs.

CHE120: Introduction to General Organic and Biochemistry

One-semester course required for Veterinary Science Technology students. Basic principles of general, organic and biochemistry are presented with emphasis on applications to health science. Topics include measurement, states of matter, bonding theory, solutions, acids, buffers and pH, structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, sterols, amino acids, proteins, molecular approach to enzymatic action, digestion, metabolism and nutrition. Notes: (1) Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (2) Restricted to VST students in the fall and alternative summer semesters. (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent and high school chemistry with laboratory. Offered on: G / 4 cr. hrs.

CHE122: Foundations of College Chemistry

One-semester course presenting chemical principles, specifically designed for students enrolled in a science or engineering curriculum who plan to enroll in a one-year course in college chemistry (CHE 133-134). Lectures provide introduction to general principles, laws of chemical combination, thermochemistry, electrochemistry and chemical equilibrium. Laboratory work illustrates basic principles presented in lectures. Notes: (1) When CHE122 is not available, CHE100 may be substituted with permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. (2) CHE122 may not be used as a substitute for CHE133. Neither CHE100 nor CHE122 may be taken after a student has completed CHE133 or its equivalent. (3) Credit given for CHE122 or CHE100, but not both. (4) Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or high school Algebra I or equivalent. Corequisite: MAT111 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

CHE133: College Chemistry I

Two-semester sequence for students whose emphasis is chemistry, biology, engineering, medicine or dentistry. Includes study of general principles, laws of chemical combination, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and chemical equilibrium. Laboratory work is basically quantitative in nature and emphasizes experimental techniques and study through observation. Second semester places emphasis on equilibrium through study of inorganic qualitative analysis. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 1 hr. recitation, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CHE100 or CHE122 or equivalent or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean and MAT124. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

CHE134: College Chemistry II

Two-semester sequence for students whose emphasis is chemistry, biology, engineering, medicine or dentistry. Includes study of general principles, laws of chemical combination, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and chemical equilibrium. Laboratory work is basically quantitative in nature and emphasizes experimental techniques and study through observation. Second semester places emphasis on equilibrium through study of inorganic qualitative analysis. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 1 hr. recitation, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CHE133 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean and MAT124. Offered on: A-E-G / 4 cr. hrs.

CHE200: Principles of Organic and Biochemistry

Basic principles of organic chemistry and chemistry of physiologically significant compounds. Lecture topics include discussion of properties and preparations of major families of organic compounds with emphasis on biologically important compounds such as proteins, carbohydrates and vitamins. Laboratory reinforces basic techniques employed in general chemistry, illustrates representative mechanisms, and introduces techniques and procedures encountered in organic preparations and analysis. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CHE100, CHE122 or CHE133, or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

CHE250: Organic Chemistry I

Two-semester sequence presenting theory, nomenclature, preparation, fundamental reactions and reaction mechanisms of both aliphatic and aromatic compounds, including behavior of the major functional groups. Both chemical and instrumental methods of organic analysis, including separation and structure elucidation techniques, are developed. Basic laboratory techniques are taught and representative compounds are prepared. Some products prepared in the laboratory are characterized utilizing chromatographic and instrumental techniques. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 1 hr. recitation, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CHE134 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: A-E-G / 5 cr. hrs.

CHE251: Organic Chemistry II

Two-semester sequence presenting theory, nomenclature, preparation, fundamental reactions and reaction mechanisms of both aliphatic and aromatic compounds, including behavior of the major functional groups. Both chemical and instrumental methods of organic analysis, including separation and structure elucidation techniques, are developed. Basic laboratory techniques are taught and representative compounds are prepared. Some products prepared in the laboratory are characterized utilizing chromatographic and instrumental techniques. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Natural Sciences. (3 hrs. lecture, 1 hr. recitation, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CHE250. Offered on: A-E-G / 5 cr. hrs.

Chinese

CHI101: Elementary Chinese I

First half of the introductory sequence in Chinese which develops the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing with emphasis on communicative competence. Integrated teaching methodology combines best of grammatical and functional approaches to language acquisition. Basic concepts of Chinese culture are introduced. Required online workbook/lab manual course component. This course is for students with little or no prior knowledge of Chinese. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Foreign Language. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CHI102: Elementary Chinese II

Second half of the introductory sequence in Chinese which develops the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing with emphasis on communicative competence. Integrated teaching methodology combines best of grammatical and functional approaches to language acquisition. Basic concepts of Chinese culture are introduced. Required online assignments and tutorials. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Foreign Language. Prerequisite: CHI101 or fulfillment of equivalent high school requirement. Offered on: A-G / 3 cr. hrs.

Cinema Studies

CIN111: Cinema Studies I: From Kinetescopes to Kane

Traces origin and development of motion pictures from early Lumiere films to pre-WWII era. Includes screenings, analysis and discussion of significant films representing such topics as evolution of film grammar, German Expressionism, Soviet montage and American studio system. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Humanities. No prerequisites. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CIN112: Cinema Studies II: From Noir to Now

Traces development of motion pictures from WWII era to the present. Includes screenings, analysis and discussion of significant films representing such topics as Film Noir, Italian Neorealism, French New Wave, emergence of national cinema, and American independent film. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Humanities. No prerequisites. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CIN113: American Cinema

Introductory in film studies that surveys American film industry as an art form, an industry and a system of representation and communication. Explores how Hollywood films work technically, aesthetically and culturally to reinforce and challenge America's national self-image. No prerequisites. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CIN114: Introduction to Film Analysis

This course introduces and provides a foundation in the language of filmic expression and the methods of film study through analysis of significant cinematic work. Emphasis is on ways of looking at film, the major concepts of theory, the various forms of film, and the techniques that determine visual styles. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Humanities and The Arts. No prerequisites. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CIN117: Digital Filmmaking I

Introduction to filmmaking technology and industry practices, including techniques of pre-production, production and post-production in digital filmmaking. Emphasis is on principles of narrative filmmaking. Digital camcorders, computer-based non-linear editing and other equipment available in lab. No prerequisites. Offered on: A-E / 3 cr. hrs.

CIN118: Digital Filmmaking II

Provides opportunity to practice advanced production and editing techniques such as multiple-subject staging, split-editing of sound and picture, various montage styles, continuity and voice-over narration. Students develop production assignments in consultation with instructor. Prosumer digital video cameras, computer-based non-linear editing and other equipment available. Prerequisite: CIN117 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CIN156: The Documentary Film

Traces development of documentary film through viewing films, reading critical essays, and discussing and writing about the films. Students analyze films focusing on cinematic elements such as style, point of view and narrative. Students examine films as statements by individuals living within a particular cultural framework, as instruments of propaganda, as entertainment, and as devices which expand our perspectives of world around us. Notes: (1) Credit given for CIN156 or ENG208, but not both. (2) Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Humanities and The Arts. Prerequisite: ENG101. Offered on: A-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CIN242: Selected Genres in Cinema

Analysis of themes and their stylistic interpretation in notable films of a particular genre (i.e. science fiction, comedy, the Western, etc.). Through critical examination of historically significant films, with comparisons with original literary works, when appropriate, students will work toward a definition of the selected genre for the class. No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

College Seminar

The following courses may fulfill the college seminar requirement: ART105, ART144, BUS115, COL101, COL105, COL111, COL141, COT101, CSE110, CYB101, CUL101, DIA100, INT115, LIB101, LIB103, MUS115, OTA100, THR100, WST112.

COL100: The College Experience

This is a thematic College Seminar course in which the standard learning outcomes for COL101 will be taught within the framework of the selected theme. It is a rotating course, its content varying from semester to semester. No prerequisite. Offered on G / 1-2 cr. hrs.

COL101: College Seminar

The course facilitates students’ transition to and success at Suffolk County Community College. Through discussions, readings, critical thinking and information literacy, students will develop academic skills, a connection with the College, and a familiarity with College resources and services. Students are expected to enroll in this class in their first semester. Note: This course cannot be used to fulfill an unrestricted elective. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 1 cr. hr.

COL105: Personal Growth and College Life

Intensified version of COL101 intended primarily for students in developmental programs. In addition to teaching specific techniques for student success such as study skills, library use, test-taking strategies, goal setting and time management, this seminar specifically addresses non-academic student needs upon which academic survival may depend. Note: For those students placed in it, this course satisfies the College Seminar (COL101) graduation requirement. It cannot be used to fulfill liberal arts or unrestricted elective credits in any degree or certificate program. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COL110: Service Learning through College Seminar

The course facilitates students’ transition to and success at Suffolk County Community College. Through discussions, classroom exercises, information literacy, and a campus project students will develop academic survival skills and a familiarity with college resources while fostering civic responsibility within their college community. No prerequisite. This course satisfies the College Seminar graduation requirement. Offered on G / 3 cr. hrs.

COL111: Adult Learner College Seminar

This course is designed specifically for adult learners who will learn and empower themselves with strategies for becoming a successful college student. Provided are necessary information and techniques to navigate the terrain of higher education, to improve academic performance, to evaluate strengths, weaknesses, life goals, and to identify strategies that can enhance one's personal, academic and career growth as a life-long learner. Through exercises and assignments, the academic culture will be examined within a variety of topics that include goal setting, decision making, study skills, time management, stress reduction, and campus resources. Note: This course can be used as a substitute for COL101: College Seminar. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 1.5 cr. hrs.

COL120: Portfolio Preparation

Provides adults with a vehicle for identifying and demonstrating college-level learning achieved outside the classroom. Students provided with necessary information and techniques for choosing a degree program and preparing a portfolio that describes and documents the learning. The portfolio may then be presented to the faculty for evaluation. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 1 cr. hr.

COL141: EOP-College Seminar

This course consists of a summer and fall component. EOP students will learn the necessary technical skills for college success such as study skills, library use, test-taking strategies, goal setting and time management during the summer portion. The fall component incorporates an integration into the College community by student's active participation in campus activities and clubs. Note: This course cannot be used to fulfill an unrestricted elective. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COL295: Special Topics: College Studies

Special and current topics in college seminar may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 1-3 cr. hrs.

COL297: Independent Study: College Studies

Independent study courses in freshman seminar may be available. See the online catalog for a complete listing or contact academic chair. Offered on: A-E-G / 1-4 cr. hrs.

Communication Studies

COM101: Introduction to Human Communication

Introduces field of communication studies. Through lecture, discussion, and practice, students study areas such as public speaking, small group problem solving, verbal and nonverbal communication, interpersonal communication, critical listening, and related areas. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Basic Communication. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM102: Interpersonal Communication

Stresses development of interpersonal skills necessary for building and maintaining productive and positive relationships in a variety of work and social settings. Topics include interpersonal trust, self-disclosure, assertiveness, conflict and conflict management. Students study various theories of interpersonal communication and practice interpersonal skills in class. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Basic Communication. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM105: Public Speaking

Introduction to essential steps in preparing and presenting speeches. Structured exercises and presentations are used to help students master each phase, including topic selection, audience analysis, research content, organization, style and delivery. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Basic Communication and Humanities. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM107: Small Group Communication

Application of communication skills to problem solving in small group context. Emphasis placed on dynamics, interaction, team building and related skills. Recommended for general studies and other non-nursing and health career-oriented students. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM110: Speech Improvement

Imparts confidence and improved speaking style. Students work on individual and group activities to improve articulation, pronunciation, projection, rate, intonation and language usage. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM111: Voice and Diction

Studies nature of speech and voice mechanism in order to provide individualized training for improvement of voice quality and articulation. Emphasis placed on respiration, phonation, resonance, articulation and the phonetic basis of speech. Not designed to provide therapy for students with severe speech disorders. Note: Credit given for COM111 or COM112, but not both. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM112: American English Pronunciation and Diction

Intended to help those students who, as speakers of English as a second language, are self-conscious or fearful about how they sound to native speakers or worry that their accents will interfere with educational or employment opportunities. Not intended to make them lose their accents, a goal which is neither realistic nor desirable. The goal is to make speech in the new language clear and understandable so that the student can speak it with confidence in all situations. Note: Credit given for COM111 or COM112 but not both. Prerequisite: ESL Level 5 or permission of the Chair/Academic Dean. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM114: Communication in the Digital Age

This course explores the history, social effects and possible future implications of digital communication. Topics include the formation of new communicative behaviors and actions, advantages and challenges of the new mode, and practical knowledge and skills for conducting digital communication. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM121: Oral Interpretation

Beginning course in oral reading stressing development of understanding of the meaning of literature and the ability to communicate this meaning to others orally. Included is study of recorded readings, and analysis, adaptation and oral presentation of representative literary forms. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Humanities. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM131: Theories of Persuasion

Study of theories used to create verbal and visual strategies designed to influence thinking and behaviors of individuals and groups. Also examines application of these theories to advertising, marketing, community affairs, political campaigns and public relations. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Humanities. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM133: Freedom of Speech

Reviews thinking and events in Western culture that gave rise to freedoms of expression guaranteed by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. In addition, the course examines key issues and court decisions concerning social, political, artistic and commercial communications. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Humanities. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM202: Intercultural Communication

Explores how cultural differences influence communication. Emphasis on theories, concepts, research findings and practice in intercultural settings. Activities are designed to promote cultural sensitivity, enabling students to confront their own assumptions and cultural biases, and increase their intercultural communication competence. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Other World Civilizations. Prerequisite: COM101 or COM102. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

COM204: Argumentation and Debate

Introduces study of argument. Students learn to identify arguments in variety of contexts, prepare and present written and oral arguments, and evaluate arguments through critical examination of their strengths and weaknesses. Both psychological and logical constructs examined. Students apply principles of argumentation in organized debates. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for Humanities. Prerequisite: COM101 or COM105. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

COM295: Special Topics: Communications

Special and current topics in Communication may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

COM296: Special Topics Honors: Communications

Honors special topics in Communications may be available for Honors students as well as those who have received permission from a campus Honors Program Coordinator. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

COM297: Independent Study: Communications

Independent study courses in communications may be available. See the online catalog for a complete listing or contact academic chair. Offered on: A-E-G / 1-4 cr. hrs.

Community Residence Service

CRS100: Introduction to Developmental Disabilities

This course will provide an introduction to the field of developmental disabilities. The coursework will familiarize students with various disabilities, and their impact on abilities, from conception through adulthood. Examination of disability culture, the law and how families and others are impacted will be addressed. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRS125: Community Residence Management I

This course will provide an overview of the historical perspectives, philosophies and operations of a community based residential or day program for the developmentally disabled population. Among the various topics will be a practical look at the care and treatment of the disabled, as well as skills necessary to ensure a quality program. Ancillary readings, in addition to the textbook will be provided. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRS297: Independent Study: Community Residence Services

This is an independent study class and topics will vary.

Computer Science

CSE110: Computer Science College Seminar

Methods and techniques students can adopt to promote their perseverance and success at the College in general and in the Computer Science and Information Technology fields in particular. Specific topics include college procedures and resources, academic advisement, time management, goal-setting, test and note taking, health issues and other areas related to student success in a computer related fields in college. Students are expected to enroll in this class in their first semester. No prerequisites. Offered on: A / 1 cr. hr.

CSE118: Fundamentals of Programming

An introductory programming course for the Computer Science major. Topics include basic computer and programming concepts such as hardware, software, numbering systems, identifiers, variables, constants, data types, and operations, standard input and output, selections, loops, functions and methods, single and multidimensional arrays, and objects and classes. The course consists of 100-minute face-to-face lecture and 100-minute instructor-led lab each week for 15 weeks. Weekly homework programming projects and a final project of at least 100 lines of source code are expected. (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT111 or higher. Corequisite: MAT124 or higher. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CSE148: Object-Oriented Programming

An intermediate programming course for the Computer Science major. Topics include class abstraction and encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism, exception handling and text IO, abstract classes and interfaces, graphical user interface, event-driven programming, binary I/0, and recursion. The course consists of 200-minute face-to-face lecture with some instructor-led lab practice each week. Weekly programming homework projects and a final project of at least 500 lines of source code are required. Prerequisites: MAT124 or higher, CSE118 with a C or higher. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

CSE218: Data Structures and Algorithms

An extension of programming methodology to cover data storage and manipulation on complex data sets. Topics include: programming and applications of data structures; stacks, queues, lists, binary trees, heaps, priority queues, balanced trees and graphs. Recursive programming is heavily utilized. Fundamental sorting and searching algorithms are examined along with informal efficiency comparisons. Students expected to be proficient with a professional IDE for coding and debugging. The course consists of 100-minute face-to-face lecture and 100-minute instructor-led lab each week. (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CSE148 with a C or higher. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CSE222: Computer Architecture and Organization

This course covers fundamentals of computer architecture and organization. Topics include classical von Neumann machine, major functional units, primary memory, representations of numerical (integer and floating point) and non-numerical data, CPU architecture, instruction encoding, fetch, decode, and execute cycle, instruction formats, addressing modes, symbolic assembler, assembly language programming, handling of subprogram calls at assembly level, mapping between high-level language patterns and assembly/machine language, interrupts and I/0 operations, virtual memory management, and data access from a magnetic disk. A number of other programming topics such as C programming language constructs (control and data structures, pointers, arrays and functions) and their relationship to the underlying architecture are introduced. Instructor-led laboratory work involves programming and debugging using machine language, assembly language and C. (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CSE148 with a C or higher. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs

CSE248: Advanced Object-Oriented Programming

Development of the basic concepts and techniques learned in CSE148 and CSE218 into practical programming skills that include a systematic approach to program design, coding, testing, and debugging. Application of these skills to the construction of robust programs of 1000 to 2000 lines of source code. Use of programming environments and tools to aid in the software development process. The course consists of 100-minute face-to-face lecture and 100-minute instructor-led lab each week. (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CSE218 with a C or higher. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

Construction Technology

COT101: College Seminar for Technology

Introduces Construction Technology–Architectural Technology students to general skills needed for success at college and in the workplace. Connects the college experience and its impact on students' skills necessary to compete in world of work. Fulfills College Seminar requirement for students in the Construction Technology/Architectural Technology program. No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 1 cr. hr.

COT110: Surveying I

Care and use of surveying instruments. Taping and taping corrections, differential leveling, traverse and area computation, stadia topography and construction surveys. (2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Corequisite: MAT112. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

COT114: Construction Methods

Methods of residential and commercial construction including site preparation, concrete placement, timber and steel framing techniques, moisture control and finishing. No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

COT137: Architectural History

This course introduces students to basic theories of planning, design, structural innovations and materials of historically, socially and culturally significant architectural buildings from the Ancient Egyptian and Greek architecture to the present. (offered fall semester only) No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

COT166: Statics

One-semester course in statics. Includes vector concept of force, equilibrium, centroids, moments of inertia, analysis of structures, and fluid statics. (offered spring semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 1 hr. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT112 with a C or better. Corequisite: MAT124. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

COT222: Site Planning

Basic principles of land surveying applied to site planning and design. Concepts of site design and engineering are presented from analysis to design drawings. Areas covered include zoning concepts, constraints of environmental considerations, roadways and land subdivision, parking, and site utilities and drainage. (offered spring semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: COT110 and MAT112. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

COT233: Strength of Materials

Study of relationships existing between externally applied forces and internally induced stresses and strains in various types of mechanical or structural components such as welds, bolts, rivets, shafts pressure vessels, beams and columns. This is accomplished using principles of stress and strain, Poisson's ratio and thermally introduced loading. (offered fall semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: COT166 and MAT124. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

COT236: Green Building Principles

Principles of Green Building Methods of residential and commercial construction that incorporate Green Building principles and technologies in support of the US Green Building Council LEED Program. (offered spring semester only) Prerequisite: COT114. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

COT240: Construction Estimating and Scheduling

Interpretations of plans and specifications, preparation of construction estimates, resource requirements in building systems, including large-scale Civil Engineering works such as highways, bridges and utility projects. Estimating databases, labor pricing, cost analysis from small-scale projects to heavy civil infrastructure are developed. Introduces the most accepted methods for scheduling construction project from start to finish. Typical projects are heavy civil infrastructure types, such as highways, bridges and utility projects. Students create and filter schedules based upon plans, manage schedules, compute critical path, and create reports and PERT charts. Students also work with various aspects of scheduling creation, with emphasis on maintenance of schedules. (offered fall semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: COT114. Offer on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

COT243: Professional Practices in the Construction Industry

Day-to-day operation of a construction contracting business is presented. Information presented includes practical matters such as business ownership, cost estimating and bidding, contract bonds, required types of insurance, construction business methods, labor law and labor relations. Codes and specification are presented as they apply to the previous subjects. (offered spring semester only) Prerequisite: COT240. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

Criminal Justice

Although Criminal Justice courses cannot be used to fulfill social sciences requirements at SCCC, several are transferable as social sciences electives at various four-year SUNY colleges. See Criminal Justice Department for details.

CRJ101: Introduction to Criminal Justice

Introductory survey of federal, state and local criminal justice systems including police, courts, prosecutor, Grand Jury, trial jury, probation, parole, and correctional system. Gives beginning students broad overview of role of criminal justice in a free society and provides foundation for all other courses in the program. Emphasizes importance of ethics in the criminal justice system. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ103: Substantive Criminal Law

Study of prescriptive and proscriptive substantive criminal law. Considers in detail role of law in a free society, provisions of Uniform Penal Code as well as other state and local substantive laws, case illustrations of these laws, and impact of federal and state court decisions on enforcement of substantive laws by police. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ105: Police Operations

Introduction to philosophy, role and operations of police and other law enforcement agencies in our society. Includes historical analysis of policing, its culture, and its relationship to law and community. Examines complex problems police face in their mission to enforce the law while providing services in democratic society. Impact of computer and other technological advances on policing also examined. Emphasis on police ethics throughout course. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ107: Evidence and Procedural Law

Study of rules of evidence and Uniform Criminal Procedure Law as they apply to criminal court cases. Considers relationship of rules of evidence and fair procedural laws to justice in a democratic society, effect of federal and state court decisions on procedural law, evidentiary and procedural requirements for proper presentation of cases in court, and role of the police officer as a witness in court. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ109: Introduction to Corrections

Analysis of role of the correctional sub-system within the criminal justice system with an examination of the history and philosophy of corrections; nature and problems of the institutional system; probation, parole and other community-based alternatives to institutionalization; legal and ethical problems of the system; and an evaluation of the effectiveness of the system in reducing crime through deterrence and rehabilitation. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ111: Criminalistics

Applications of forensic science to investigation of crime. Studies in detail supportive role of the criminalist in assisting the investigator and proper collection and processing of a variety of physical evidence and its preparation for presentation at the criminal trial. Cases from federal, state and local police laboratories are used to illustrate basic principles. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ201: Human Relations and Criminal Justice

Study of complex relationship between criminal justice system and people in the community. Considers constitutional liberties of all citizens and role of agencies of criminal justice in respecting and protecting those liberties; behavioral manifestations of economic, social and political problems in the community and criminal justice response to such activities; and need for and methods of developing a constructive community relations program in the criminal justice agency. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ202: Introduction to Probation and Parole

Introduction to the theory and practice of probation and parole as alternatives to incarceration. Examines the roots of current social and political controversies in these fields. It includes an analysis of the processes and procedures of probation and parole. Also analyzes involvement of specialized private agencies and factors that impact on the imposition and revocation of probation and parole. Various career options are assessed. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ203: Introduction to Private Security

Provides overview of private security in U.S. Examines principles, methods and techniques used by the industry. Also focuses on internal security, proprietary policy, civil liability, risk management and analysis, legal powers and limitations, loss prevention and security surveys. Special emphasis on ethics in private security throughout course. (offered spring semester only) No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ205: Introduction to Criminal Investigations

Introduction to procedures and techniques of criminal investigations. Provides overview of history of investigations, role of investigators and rules of evidence. Examines techniques for crime scene preservation, processing of evidence, surveillance, and undercover operations. Students identify and discuss information and research sources, write reports and learn case management skills. Role of computers and other advanced technology in criminal investigations also explored. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ206: Organized Crime

Overview of organized criminal activity in United States. Examines history of organized crime and various activities, both legal and illegal, in which organized criminal enterprises become involved. Analyzes role of law enforcement in combating organized crime as well as reciprocal influence organized crime has on politicians, media and public perception. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ207: Juvenile Justice

Study of nature and causes of juvenile delinquency and methods and techniques of police and other community agencies in dealing with juvenile misconduct. Also deals with role of substantive and procedural law and nature of the court and correctional system as they relate to the younger offender, as well as role of police in preventing and reducing crime through management of an effective juvenile aid program. No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ208: Terrorism and Law Enforcement

This course provides a basic understanding of terrorism and how it affects us as a country and as individuals. More specifically, the course creates a foundation for students seeking information concerning why and how terrorists function, methods for combating terrorism and the fear associated with it, homeland protection, prevention strategies, and the effects of terrorism on the balance between collective and individual rights. (offered spring semester only) No prerequisite. Offered on: A-E-G / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ209: Criminal Justice Capstone Course

Forum for graduating Criminal Justice majors to synthesize and display knowledge expected after completing all core courses in program. Limited to twelve to fifteen students, seminar focuses on discussion of individual research assignments documented with written and oral report. Includes multiple choice examination based on Criminal Justice program's student learning outcomes. Note: All Criminal Justice students enrolling in Suffolk County Community College beginning September 2004 must take the Capstone course prior to graduation. Prerequisite or corequisite: CRJ101, CRJ103, CRJ105, CRJ107, and CRJ109 (15 credits). Offered on: A-E-G / 1 cr. hr.

CRJ215: Criminal Justice Internship

Integrates criminal justice theory with practical application. Provides opportunity to participate in observational and work assignments with governmental agencies and private businesses. Requires minimum of 90 hours of fieldwork, attendance at weekly seminar for one hour and fifteen minutes, and individual conferences between student and instructor. Prerequisite: CRJ101, 2.5 GPA or better. Offered on: A-E / 3 cr. hrs.

CRJ295: Special Topics: Criminal Justice

Special and current topics in Criminal Justice may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

CRJ296: Special Topics Honors: Criminal Justice

Honors special topics in Criminal Justice may be available for Honors students as well as those who have received permission from a campus Honors Program Coordinator. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

CRJ297: Independent Study: Criminal Justice

Independent study courses in criminal justice may be available. See the online catalog for a complete listing or contact academic chair. Offered on: A-E-G / 1-4 cr. hrs.

Culinary Arts

CUL101: Hospitality College Seminar

Explores career opportunities and challenges that exist in many areas of the hospitality industry. Discusses contemporary management issues including diversity, retention, harassment and TQM leadership. Develops an appreciation for self-awareness, problem solving, critical thinking and time management techniques that will aid the student both in the classroom and in the workplace. No prerequisite. Offered on: E / 1 cr. hr.

CUL105: Culinary Fundamentals and Sanitation

Food safety and sanitation are the foundations of all professional cooking. In this course, students learn professional standards and emerging issues related to safe food production. Sanitation lectures focus on issues of contamination and foodborne illness, establishing food safety system, the HACCP food safety system, cleaning and sanitizing, accident prevention, sanitation regulations and food protection. Lab time allows students to apply these concepts as they begin their career in a professional kitchen by learning foundational techniques of converting and applying recipes in culinary and baking applications. Students are exposed to cooking methods used for basic soups, stocks, sauces, meats, vegetables, and grains; basic baking methods include quick breads, yeast breads, doughs and pies. Students are required to pass the Suffolk County Food Manager's Certificate or the National Restaurant Association ServSafe Food Manager’s Certification. (1 hr. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisites: RDG098, ENG010, MAT001. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

CUL112: Hospitality Cost Controls

For any restaurant the key to profits is control. Course presents accounting procedures necessary to maintain profitable business. Topics include control areas of purchasing, receiving, storing, production, serving and appropriate computer application. Upon completion students are able to use these procedures to produce faculty-instructed restaurant projects. Prerequisite: MAT006 or MAT007 or MAT009 or equivalent; MAT009 recommended. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

CUL113: Wine and Beverage Management

Provides complete understanding of setting up successful beverage operation, from layout and design to practical hands-on application and formulation of making wide selection of drink recipes. Examines differences among fermented beverages, distilled spirits, great wines and beers, and proper storage procedures. Culminates in development of successful beverage marketing program. Prerequisite: RDG098. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

CUL114: Culinary Arts I

Principles and practices necessary to effectively perform in management position in food service industry. Flow of food through commercial food service operation including purchasing, receiving, storing, fabrication, production and service is examined. Upon successful completion of course students are able to understand basic cooking principles and apply them through the standardized recipe and menu. Development of effective and efficient managerial skills for commercial or institutional kitchen presented and practiced. (2 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: RDG099, ENG010, MAT006 or MAT007 or MAT009 or equivalent. Prerequisite or corequisite: CUL105. Offered on: E / 4 cr. hrs.

CUL115: Baking and Pastry Arts I

Introduces techniques necessary to produce delicious pastries, yeast bread doughnuts, specialty cookies and custards, and to assemble and decorate cakes. Lecture combined with hands-on application enables students to develop necessary skills to produce specialty baked products that incorporate proper texture, flavor and restaurant-setting presentation. (2 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: RDG099, ENG010, MAT006 or MAT007 or MAT009 or equivalent. Prerequisite or corequisite: CUL105. Offered on: E / 4 cr. hrs.

CUL116: Dining Room Management

Service aspect of food service management. History and styles of service used in hotel and restaurant industry, determination of customer needs, and control and service of beverages are examined. Students are required to work special functions to gain practical service experience. Prerequisite: RDG098. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

CUL120: Hospitality Marketing

The hotel/restaurant/tourism business is marketing. It is essential to determine what customers want and provide it to them when they want it. Furthermore, it must be all wrapped up in a beautiful package at a reasonable price. Students will learn the intangible nature of hospitality products and the importance of positioning, targeting, and image development. Prerequisite RDG098. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

CUL132: Hospitality Supervision

Management's role in leadership is ongoing in a hospitality operation. Introduces students to current management techniques, including employee empowerment, cultural diversity, high-performance teams, service strategies, conflict management, and strategic career planning. Prerequisite: RDG098. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

CUL215: Cultures and Cuisines

Presents the development of cuisine in a variety of cultural contexts, and explores the influences that regional differences in climate, history, and cultural expectations have on seasonings, ingredients, and preparation methods typical to an area. Exposes students to the preparation of meats, vegetables, a variety of typical dishes, and service styles for regional American, classical French, Mediterranean, and Asian cuisines. Hands-on course includes recipe production, menu review, and cultural terminology. Through recipe production, class discussions and lectures, students gain working knowledge of multicultural influences on food ways from around the world. (2 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisites: CUL105 and CUL114. Offered on: E / 4 cr. hrs.

CUL217: Baking and Pastry Arts II

Hands-on course teaching proper use of yeasts, starters, mixing methods, and proofing procedures necessary for production of fresh quality bread. Topics include the production of artisan breads, flatbreads, braided breads, baguettes, as well as French, Italian, and other specialty breads. (6 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT001. Prerequisite or corequisite: CUL105, CUL115. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

CUL218: Baking and Pastry Arts III

Develops proper skills necessary for the production and decoration of cakes, from simple layer to elegant wedding cakes. Includes instruction in proper decorating techniques and in the production of icings, pastry creams, mousses, souffles, tarts, gateaux, and pastries. (2 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CUL115. Prerequisite or corequisite: CUL217, CUL241. Offered on: E / 4 cr. hrs.

CUL219: Advanced Pastry Arts IV

Presents proper methods of working with chocolate for display and plate presentation. Hands-on topics include the production of pulled sugar flowers and centerpieces, marzipan-shaped fruits, pastillage, and nougatine edibles. Upon completion, students are able to produce special instructor-directed projects made from pulled sugar, chocolate, and marzipan. (2 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CUL115. Prerequisite or corequisite: CUL217, CUL241. Offered on: E / 4 cr. hrs.

CUL228: Garde Manger

Explores the art and craft of the cold kitchen, where buffet platter decoration and presentation take center stage. Learn hands-on techniques for preparing smoked meat and fish platters, pates, terrines, mousses, galantines, and the making of great sausage or charcuterie. (6 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CUL105, CUL114. Prerequisite or corequisite: CUL215. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

CUL240: Culinary Arts Internship/Cooperative Education

Supervised on-the-job training in establishment representative of hospitality industry. Students work 200 hours in their placement, attend on-campus weekly seminars and maintain journal. Taken during summer semester after completion of first and second semester program requirements. Registration in this course requires that students purchase liability insurance through the College. Prerequisites: CUL105, CUL114. Prerequisite or corequisite CUL215. Offered on: E / 4 cr. hrs.

CUL241: Baking and Pastry Internship/Cooperative Education

Supervised on-the-job training in Baker’s Workshop, an establishment representative of hospitality industry. Students work a minimum of 200 hours in their placement, attend regular instruction sessions and maintain a production log. Taken during spring, summer session or fall semester after completion of program prerequisites; registration to be approved by Advisor based on space availability. Registration in this course requires that students purchase liability insurance through the College. Prerequisite: CUL105. Prerequisite or corequisites: CUL115. Offered on: E / 4 cr. hrs.

CUL250: Culinary Capstone Course

Capstone course requiring students to apply theoretical and practical knowledge under an individualized faculty-supervised hospitality project. Project incorporates students specific areas of expertise, including culinary arts, recipe development, concept development, marketing strategies, beverage management and profitability analysis. Completed project to be thoroughly researched, written and presented orally both to faculty and students. Prerequisite: COM101, CUL112, CUL113, CUL114, CUL116, CUL120, CUL132 and CUL215 OR COM101, CUL112, CUL113, CUL115, CUL116, CUL120, CUL132 and CUL217. Offered on: E / 2 cr. hrs.

CUL295: Special Topics: Culinary Arts

Special and current topics in culinary arts may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

CUL297: Independent Study: Culinary Arts

Independent study courses in culinary arts may be available. See the online catalog for a complete listing or contact academic chair. Offered on: A-E-G / 1-4 cr. hrs.

Cybersecurity

Enrollment of CYB courses is limited to students officially admitted to the Cybersecurity and Information Assurance program. Students in Information Technology: Network Design and Administration may enroll in CYB111 and CYB121.

CYB101: College Seminar for Cybersecurity

Freshman Seminar for Cybersecurity Technology majors introduces first semester students to the college experience and cybersecurity program at SCCC. Students will gain skills that increase their level of preparedness and success in the college setting. Topics include academic advisement, time management, study skills, library research, and campus resources. In addition, the course will cover topics relevant to the major, such as professionalism, ethics, electricity and power fundamentals, and safety skills related to cybersecurity. (offered fall semester only) No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 1 cr. hr.

CYB111: CCNA Introduction to Networks

The Cisco CCNA® Routing and Switching curriculum provides a comprehensive overview of networking; from fundamentals to advanced applications and services. This course emphasizes theoretical concepts and practical application, while providing opportunities for students to gain the skills and hands-on experience needed to design, install, operate, and maintain networks in small-to-medium businesses, as well as enterprise and service provider environments. Upon completion of this course, the student will have completed the first of two courses that prepare students to take the ICND1 Certification Exam at a certified testing center. (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CYB112: Script Programming

This course provides an introduction to the script programming paradigm, and introduces and compares a range of scripting languages used for Windows, Unix and web-based applications. This course introduces the principles of scripting, covers few selected scripting languages in depth, and illustrates the advanced use of scripting by extensive case studies in application areas such as system administration, web application development, graphical user interface development, and text processing. (offered spring semester only) Prerequisite: CYB111 and CYB115. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CYB115: Client Operating Systems

Client Operating Systems provides an introduction to the features, functions and configurations of user-based computers (clients) to familiarize the students with cybersecurity protection systems. The Windows and Linux operating systems are highlighted during hands-on labs to configure and troubleshoot network connections, anti-virus applications, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and operating system management. This course presents foundational material that is used within other courses of the cybersecurity program. (offered fall semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

CYB121: CCNA Routing and Switching Essentials

The Cisco CCNA® Routing and Switching curriculum provides a comprehensive overview of networking; from fundamentals to advanced applications and services. The Routing and Switching Essentials component describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in simple networks. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches for basic functionality. Upon completion of this course, the student will have completed the second of two courses that prepare students to take the ICND1 Certification Exam at a certified testing center. Prerequisite: CYB111. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CYB125: Cybersecurity Fundamentals

Cybersecurity Fundamentals provides a comprehensive overview of basic cybersecurity issues within client and server environment. Students comprehend / demonstrate the importance of client, server, firewall security and learn how to investigate / secure against cyber threats and vulnerabilities. Utilize various tools to investigate / secure firewalls, IPS systems and enterprise network through remote diagnostics, investigation / forensic tools. Learn to install, configure and monitor cybersecurity principles to secure an enterprise network. (offered fall semester only) No prerequisite. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CYB126: Intranetworking and Infrastructure

Introduces the hardware and software tools necessary to understand, deploy, and maintain an SMB-to-enterprise network infrastructure, covering devices such as servers, routers, switches, and intrusion prevention systems. The course emphasizes how to allocate network services within the infrastructure. Configure and manage Access, Authorization and Accounting: IOS, AD, RADIUS, TACACS+. Students acquire a greater breadth of network systems and software implementation from multiple manufacturers and the best practices for deploying, managing and monitoring a network. (offered spring semester only) (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisites: CYB111 and CYB115. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CYB231: CCNA Scaling Networks and Energy Management

The Cisco CCNA® Routing and Switching curriculum provides a comprehensive overview of networking; from fundamentals to advanced applications and services. The Scaling Networks component describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in larger and more complex networks. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, and STP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement a WLAN in a small-to-medium network. (offered fall semester only) Prerequisites: CYB121. Corequisite: CYB232. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CYB232: CCNA Connecting Networks

The Cisco CCNA® Routing and Switching curriculum provides a comprehensive overview of networking; from fundamentals to advanced applications and services. The Connecting Networks component discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network. (offered fall semester only) Prerequisite: CYB121. Corequisite: CYB231. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CYB233: CCNA Security

This course provides an introduction to the core security concepts and skills needed for the installation, monitoring, and troubleshooting of network security features to maintain the integrity, confidentiality, and availability of data and devices. Various types of hands-on labs provide practical experience, including procedural and troubleshooting labs, skills integration challenges, and model building. In addition to learning the fundamentals of designing, building, and operating secure networks, students also develop problem solving, critical thinking, collaboration, teamwork, negotiation, and entrepreneurship workplace skills. Upon completion of this course, the student will be prepared to take the CCNA Security Certification Exam at a certified testing center. (offered fall semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CYB121. Corequisites: CYB231 and CYB232. Offered on: A / 4 cr. hrs.

CYB242: Information Security Capstone

This capstone course provides a review of methods for identifying network vulnerabilities, implementing network defense and exploring network forensics. Students have opportunities to implement a layered defense on a practical network, including using tools to analyze the vulnerabilities of a network. Additionally, students will research products that could serve as countermeasures against potential attacks, implement security features of the network's operating systems and develop alternate solutions based upon cost and level of security required. The course also provides students with the practical skills necessary to enhance their network security background and prepare for Professional Security Certification(s). (offered spring semester only) (1 hr. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: CYB233. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CYB243: Cyber Methods and Ethics

The focus of this course is to learn the methods, knowledge base and skills needed to successfully handle the tasks, duties, and responsibilities of an associate-level Penetration Tester/Auditor for an internal or external test team. In parallel the ethical standards and implementation associated with these methods. (offered spring semester) (3 hrs. lecture) Prerequisite: CYB126 and CYB233. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CYB244: Security Operations

Students will learn the knowledge and skills needed to successfully handle the tasks, duties, and responsibilities of an associate-level Security Analyst working in a Security Operations Center (SOC). This is an entry-level position that requires the combine knowledge of computer operating systems (Windows, Linux and Apple OS), network infrastructure (routers and switches) and security appliances (firewalls, intrusion prevention/detection systems, and authentication systems) and relate events and logged messages to malicious actions or network intrusions. (offered spring semester only) Prerequisite: CYB231, CYB232 and CYB233. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CYB280: Cybersecurity Internship

This course supports the competency-based Cybersecurity program. It requires the fieldwork in cybersecurity. Student obligations agreed upon in an internship contract. Supervising faculty hold periodic meetings with student interns and their supervisors to evaluate intern performance. In addition to eight to ten hours per week of fieldwork, students attend a 50-minute weekly seminar. Students enrolling in this course are automatically charged the liability insurance fee. (offered spring semester only) Prerequisite: Completion of 16 CYB credits. Offered on: A / 3 cr. hrs.

CYB297: Indpendent Study: Cybersecur

Independent study courses in Cybersecurity may be available. See the online catalog for a complete listing or contact academic chair. Offered on: A / 3-4 cr. hrs.

Dance

DNC101: Dance in Popular Culture

Students will explore and perform the fundamentals of styles including modern, folk, jazz, hip hop, ballet, and contemporary. The course will allow students to build a foundation in dance movement while studying influential pieces of choreography. The course will culminate in a final public performance. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for The Arts. No prerequisite. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

DNC105: Broadway Dance

This class is designed to teach the fundamentals of dance and movement techniques developed for the Broadway musical stage. Students will learn and create dances from the 20th and 21st century Broadway canon, while investigating the dance theories of master choreographers including Martha Graham, Bob Fosse, Bill T. Jones, Graciela Daniele, and Jerome Robbins. The class will culminate in a final class performance and public dance program. Note: Fulfills SUNY General Education Requirement for The Arts. No prerequisite. Offered on: G / 3 cr. hrs.

DNC195: Special Topics: Dance

Special and current topics in Dance may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term.

DNC295: Special Topics: Dance

Special and current topics in Dance may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term.

Dietetic Technician

DTE101 is open to all students and can be taken as an unrestricted elective. Enrollment in all other DTE courses is limited to students officially admitted to the Dietetic Technician program.

DTE101: Introduction to Nutrition

Introduction to basic nutrition in which study of nutrients and food is applied to making intelligent food choices. Lab allows students to apply math and reading skills to various areas of dietetics and nutrition practice. (offered fall semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Corequisite: DTE103. Minimum grade of C required to advance to next course in DTE sequence. Offered on: E / 4 cr. hrs.

DTE103: Nutrition Education for Dietetic Practitioners

In order to educate clients and facilitate change in their eating behavior, dietetic practitioners must be effective communicators. This course helps students improve their success as dietetic technicians by focusing on communication skills, education principles, interviewing, counseling, behavior modification, and evaluating group and individual instruction. Consideration given to effects of socioeconomic and cultural factors in relation to making food choices. (offered fall semester only) Prerequisite: MAT007 or equivalent. Corequisite: DTE101. Minimum grade of C is required to advance to next course in DTE sequence. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

DTE121: Introduction to Clinical Nutrition

Review of nutrients from perspective of their absorption, digestion, metabolism and interaction. In clinical, students apply principles of nutrition including diet history, food intake studies, national nutrition guidelines, and menu planning and modification. Requires purchase of liability insurance through the College. (offered spring semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 90 hrs. clinical) Prerequisites: BIO105, DTE101 and DTE103 with grades of C or higher. Corequisite: DTE122. Minimum grade of C is required to advance to next course in DTE sequence. Offered on: E / 5 cr. hrs.

DTE122: Nutrition Through the Life Cycle

As nutrition educators, dietetic technicians must be knowledgeable about nutritional needs of individuals of all ages, genders, cultural backgrounds and activity levels. Course conveys information to be used by students in their professional roles as nutrition educators. Consideration given to community programs which provide nutritional support to those in various age groups; special needs related to exercise, stress and energy balance; consumer concerns about foods; and issues of domestic and world hunger. (offered spring semester only) Prerequisites: DTE101 and DTE103 with grades of C or higher. Corequisite: DTE121. Minimum grade of C is required to advance to next course in DTE sequence. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

DTE201: Introduction to Food Service

Survey course introducing the variety of foods available, menu planning, purchasing and preparation. Topics include food measurement, legislation, safety and sanitation, preparation techniques for nutritional adequacy, and food acceptability. Food labs held in kitchen. (offered fall semester only) Prerequisite: DTE101 and DTE103 with grades of C or higher. Minimum grade of C is required to advance to next course in DTE sequence. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

DTE203: Dietetics Seminar

Capstone course for the Dietetic Technician Program. Orientation to the profession of dietetics with an emphasis on professional organizations, ethical issues related to dietetics practice, and career and educational opportunities. Legislative and policy making related to dietetics is explored. Application of evidence-based practice versus media propaganda is demonstrated. (offered spring semester only) No prerequisite. Corequisites: DTE211 and DTE213. Minimum grade of C is required to advance to next course in DTE sequence. Offered on: E / 1 cr. hr.

DTE204: Advanced Nutrition in the Community Setting

This course will look at nutrition monitoring at the local and state level in the US and the fundamental components necessary to develop effective community-based programs and services to improve the nutrition and health of our society. The placement in the community fieldwork component of DTE204 will be in a designated fieldwork site to apply skills acquired during lecture and clinical of DTE205: Advanced Nutrition in the Clinical Setting. Students will identify and describe the work of inter-professional teams and the roles of others within the field site regarding the delivery of food and nutrition in the community setting. (offered summer and fall semesters) (48 hrs. fieldwork) Prerequisites: CHE100 and DTE121 with grades of C or higher. Minimum grade of C is required to advance to next course in DTE sequence. Offered on: E / 1 cr. hr.

DTE205: Advanced Nutrition in the Clinical Setting

Considers rationale and characteristics of selected therapeutic diets, their application, planning, calculation and menu adjustment. Purchase of liability insurance through the College is required. (offered fall semester only) (3 hrs. lecture, 132 hrs. clinical) Prerequisites: CHE100 and DTE121 with grades of C or higher. Corequisite: DTE204. Minimum grade of C is required to advance to next course in DTE sequence. Offered on: E / 6 cr. hrs.

DTE211: Food Service Management

Relates to functions of food service manager regarding policies and procedures; food procurement, preparation and service; sanitation and safety in quality food preparation; interaction and communication of food service personnel with others; personnel functions, cost control and budget implementation; layout and design of kitchen equipment; and use of computerized data processing systems. (offered spring semester only) Prerequisite: DTE201 and DTE205 with grade of C or higher. Corequisite: DTE203 and DTE213. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.

DTE213: Food Service Management Fieldwork

Under direction of fieldwork instructor, student has hands-on experience in all aspects of food service management at a local health care facility. Requires purchase of liability insurance through the College. (offered spring semester only) (1 hr. lecture, 180 hrs. fieldwork) Corequisite: DTE203 and DTE211. Offered on: E / 5 cr. hrs.

DTE295: Special Topics: Dietetic Technician

Special and current topics in dietetics may be available. See "Class Schedule Search" for a complete listing each term. Offered on: A-E-G / 3-4 cr. hrs.

Digital Art

DIA100: Digital Design College Seminar

Introduces first-semester Digital Art, Digital Media and Animation and Graphic Design students with college survival skills for these distinctive degree programs. No prerequisite. Offered on: E / 1 cr. hr.

DIA115: Digital Illustration I

This course examines the fundamentals of digital illustration and use of computer as a medium. Emphasis on concept, creativity and communication in drawing and composing illustrations, realistic modeling and rendering skills, and manipulation of digital software tools such as pencil, pen, and brush. Other topics are the historical development of digital illustration and the preparation of illustrations for screen, prepress and exhibition. (2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. laboratory) No prerequisite. Offered on: E / 3 cr. hrs.